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UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549

FORM 10-K

(Mark one)    
ý   ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(D) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2008

or

o

 

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(D) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

Commission File Number 0-15006

CELLDEX THERAPEUTICS, INC.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

Delaware   13-3191702
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
  (I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)

119 Fourth Avenue, Needham, Massachusetts 02494
(Address of principal executive offices) (Zip Code)

Registrant's telephone number, including area code: (781) 433-0771

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

Title of Class:   Name of Each Exchange
on Which Registered:
Common Stock, par value $.001   NASDAQ Global Market

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None

         Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes o    No ý

         Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes o    No ý

         Indicate by check mark whether the registrant: (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes ý    No o

         Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (§229.405 of this Chapter) is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant's knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. ý

         Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer or a smaller reporting company. See definitions of "large accelerated filer," "accelerated filer," and "smaller reporting company" in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):

Large accelerated filer o   Accelerated filer ý   Non-accelerated filer o
(Do not check if a smaller
reporting company)
  Smaller Reporting Company o

         Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act). Yes o    No ý

         The aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting common stock held by non-affiliates as of June 30, 2008 was $103,792,910 (excludes shares held by directors and executive officers). Exclusion of shares held by any person should not be construed to indicate that such person possesses the power, direct or indirect, to direct or cause the actions of the management or policies of the registrant, or that such person is controlled by or under common control with the registrant. The number of shares of common stock outstanding at February 20, 2009 was 15,820,593 shares.


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CELLDEX THERAPEUTICS, INC.
ANNUAL REPORT ON FORM 10-K
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2008
TABLE OF CONTENTS

 
   
   
  Page
No.

Part I

           

 

Item 1.

 

Business

  1

 

Item 1A.

 

Risk Factors

  25

 

Item 1B.

 

Unresolved Staff Comments

  37

 

Item 2.

 

Properties

  37

 

Item 3.

 

Legal Proceedings

  37

 

Item 4.

 

Submission of Matters to a Vote of Security Holders

  37

Part II

           

 

Item 5.

 

Market for Registrant's Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

  38

 

Item 6.

 

Selected Consolidated Financial Data

  40

 

Item 7.

 

Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

  43

 

Item 7A.

 

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosure About Market Risk

  63

 

Item 8.

 

Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

  64

 

Item 9.

 

Changes in and Disagreements With Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

  113

 

Item 9A.

 

Controls and Procedures

  113

 

Item 9B.

 

Other information

  114

Part III

           

 

Item 10.

 

Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance

  115

 

Item 11.

 

Executive Compensation

  120

 

Item 12.

 

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters

  135

 

Item 13.

 

Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence

  138

 

Item 14.

 

Principal Accountant Fees and Services

  138

Part IV

           

 

Item 15.

 

Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedules

  140

Signatures

  147

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        Safe Harbor Statement under the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995:    This report on Form 10-K contains forward-looking statements made pursuant to the safe harbor provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 under Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. Forward-looking statements include statements with respect to our beliefs, plans, objectives, goals, expectations, anticipations, assumptions, estimates, intentions and future performance, and involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors, which may be beyond our control, and which may cause our actual results, performance or achievements to be materially different from future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. All statements other than statements of historical fact are statements that could be forward-looking statements. You can identify these forward-looking statements through our use of words such as "may," "will," "can," "anticipate," "assume," "should," "indicate," "would," "believe," "contemplate," "expect," "seek," "estimate," "continue," "plan," "point to," "project," "predict," "could," "intend," "target," "potential" and other similar words and expressions of the future.

        There are a number of important factors that could cause the actual results to differ materially from those expressed in any forward-looking statement made by us. These factors include, but are not limited to:

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        All forward-looking statements are expressly qualified in their entirety by this cautionary notice. You are cautioned not to place undue reliance on any forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date of this report or the date of the document incorporated by reference into this report. We have no obligation, and expressly disclaim any obligation, to update, revise or correct any of the forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise. We have expressed our expectations, beliefs and projections in good faith and we believe they have a reasonable basis. However, we cannot assure you that our expectations, beliefs or projections will result or be achieved or accomplished.

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PART I

Item 1.    BUSINESS

A.    General

        As used herein, the terms "we," "us," "our," the "Company", or "Celldex" refer to Celldex Therapeutics, Inc., a Delaware corporation organized in 1983 (formerly known as AVANT Immunotherapeutics, Inc.) and its direct and indirect subsidiaries: Celldex Research Corporation ("Celldex Research"), Celldex Therapeutics, Ltd. ("Celldex Ltd.") and Megan Health, Inc. ("Megan"). The Company's principal activity since our inception has been research and product development conducted on our own behalf, as well as through joint development programs with several pharmaceutical companies and other collaborators. AVANT Immunotherapeutics, Inc. changed its name to Celldex Therapeutics, Inc. on October 1, 2008.

        Celldex is an integrated biopharmaceutical company that applies its comprehensive Precision Targeted Immunotherapy Platform to generate a pipeline of candidates to treat cancer and other difficult-to-treat diseases. Celldex's immunotherapy platform includes a complementary portfolio of monoclonal antibodies, antibody-targeted vaccines and immunomodulators to create novel disease-specific drug candidates.

        Our strategy is to develop and demonstrate proof-of-concept for our product candidates before leveraging their value through partnerships or, in appropriate situations, continuing late stage development through commercialization ourselves. Demonstrating proof-of-concept for a product candidate generally involves bringing it through Phase 1 clinical trials and one or more Phase 2 clinical trials so that we are able to demonstrate, based on human trials, good safety data for the product candidate and some data indicating its effectiveness. We thus leverage the value of our technology portfolio through corporate, governmental and non-governmental partnerships. This approach allows us to maximize the overall value of our technology and product portfolio while best ensuring the expeditious development of each individual product.

        Our current collaborations encompass the commercialization of an oral human rotavirus vaccine and the development of oncology and infectious disease vaccines. Our product candidates address large market opportunities for which we believe current therapies are inadequate or non-existent.

        Merger between AVANT and Celldex:    On March 7, 2008, we closed the merger (the "Merger") contemplated by the Agreement and Plan of Merger dated October 19, 2007 by and among Celldex (formerly AVANT Immunotherapeutics, Inc.), Callisto Merger Corporation ("Merger Sub"), a wholly owned subsidiary of Celldex, and Celldex Research (formerly Celldex Therapeutics, Inc.) (the "Merger Agreement"). Pursuant to the terms of the Merger Agreement, Merger Sub merged with and into Celldex Research, with Celldex Research as the surviving company and a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company. The total value of the transaction was approximately $75 million. Approximately 8.7 million shares were issued to the former Celldex Research shareholders in connection with the Merger. The Merger created a NASDAQ-listed, fully-integrated and diversified biopharmaceutical company with a deep pipeline of product candidates addressing high-value indications including oncology, infectious and inflammatory diseases. At the Merger, former Celldex and former AVANT shareholders owned 58% and 42% of the combined company on a fully diluted basis, respectively.

        Our board of directors approved a 1-for-12 reverse stock split of the Company's common stock, which became effective on March 7, 2008. As a result of the reverse stock split, each twelve shares of common stock were combined and reclassified into one share of common stock and the total number of shares outstanding was reduced from approximately 180 million shares (including the shares issued to former Celldex Research stockholders in the Merger) to approximately 15 million shares.

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        The Merger was accounted for using the purchase method of accounting and was treated as an acquisition by Celldex Research of Celldex (then AVANT), with Celldex Research being considered the accounting acquirer based on the application of criteria specified in Statement of Financial Accounting Standards "SFAS" No. 141, Business Combinations, ("SFAS 141"), even though Celldex (then AVANT) was the issuer of common stock and the surviving legal entity in the transaction. Under the purchase method of accounting, the deemed purchase price was allocated to AVANT's underlying tangible and identifiable intangible assets acquired and liabilities assumed based upon their respective fair values with any excess deemed purchase price allocated to goodwill. The valuation analysis conducted by the Company determined that the fair value of assets acquired and the fair value of liabilities assumed by Celldex Research exceeded the purchase price for AVANT, resulting in negative goodwill of approximately $6.0 million. In accordance with SFAS 141, the negative goodwill has been allocated to all of the acquired assets which were non-financial and non-current assets, including property and equipment, identifiable intangible assets, and in-process research and development. See Note 17 to the Company's consolidated financial statements for additional information.

        Because Celldex Research was determined to be the acquirer for accounting purposes, the historical financial statements of Celldex Research became the historical financial statements of the Company. Accordingly, the financial statements of the Company prior to the Merger reflect the financial position, results of operations and cash flows of Celldex Research, which, during the historical periods presented in the accompanying consolidated financial statements, was majority-owned by Medarex, Inc. ("Medarex"). Following the Merger, the financial statements of the current period reflect the financial position, results of operation and cash flows of the Company. The results of operations of AVANT are included in the results of operations of the Company beginning March 8, 2008. Accordingly, except as otherwise discussed below, this report reflects the financial condition, results of operations and liquidity of the combined companies at December 31, 2008 and historically of Celldex Research on a stand-alone basis for all periods prior to March 8, 2008. The financial condition, results of operations and liquidity of the Company as of the years ended December 31, 2008, 2007 and 2006 may not be indicative of the Company's future performance or reflect what the Company's financial conditions, results of operations and liquidity would have been had the Merger been consummated as of January 1, 2006 or had the Company operated as a separate, stand-alone entity during the periods presented.

        Celldex's web site is located at http://www.celldextherapeutics.com. On Celldex's web site, investors can obtain a copy of Celldex's annual report on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K, and other reports filed or furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, as soon as reasonably practicable after Celldex files such material electronically with, or furnishes it to, the Securities and Exchange Commission. None of the information posted on our website is incorporated by reference into this Annual Report.

        Research and Development Activities:    Our products are derived from a broad set of complementary technologies (collectively known as our Precision Targeted Immunotherapy Platform) which have the ability to utilize the human immune system and enable the creation of preventative and therapeutic agents. We are using our Precision Targeted Immunotherapy Platform to develop vaccines, therapeutic antibodies and other targeted immunotherapeutics that prevent or treat cancer, autoimmune disorders and disease caused by infectious organisms, and treatment vaccines that modify undesirable activity by the body's own proteins or cells. A number of our immunotherapeutic and vaccine product candidates are in various stages of clinical trials. We expect that a large percentage of

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our research and development expenses will be incurred in support of our current and future clinical trial programs. Below is a table of our currently active programs:


CURRENT PROGRAMS AND PARTNERSHIPS

Technology
  Product   Indication/Field   Partner   Status
ONCOLOGY   CDX-110   Glioblastoma multiforme   Pfizer   Phase 2
    CDX-1307   Colorectal, bladder, pancreas, ovarian and breast tumors     Phase 1
    CDX-1401   Multiple Solid Tumors     Pre-clinical
    CDX-1127   Immuno-modulation, multiple tumors     Pre-clinical

INFLAMMATORY DISEASE

 

CDX-1135
(formerly TP10)

 

Transplantation
Renal disease

 



 

Phase 1/2
Pre-clinical
    CDX-1189   Renal disease     Pre-clinical

INFECTIOUS DISEASE

 

CholeraGarde®

 

Cholera

 

Vaccine
Technologies/IVI

 

Phase 2b
    Ty800   Typhoid fever   NIH   Phase 2
    ETEC   Enterotoxigenic E coli infection   Vaccine
Technologies/NIH
  Phase 1
    CDX-2401   HIV infection   Rockefeller University   Pre-clinical

MARKETED PRODUCTS

 

Rotarix®

 

Rotavirus infection

 

GlaxoSmithKline

 

Marketed

        We currently have one product on the market and six products in clinical development. Our goal is to become a leading developer of innovative products that we call Precision Targeted Immunotherapeutics which are designed to address major unmet health care needs. Our success has depended and will continue to depend upon many factors, including our ability, and that of our licensees and collaborators, to successfully develop, obtain regulatory approval for and commercialize our product candidates. To date, commercial sales have only been generated from Rotarix® and our former Megan poultry vaccines. We have had no commercial revenues from sales of our human therapeutic or other human vaccine products and we have had a history of operating losses. It is possible that we may not be able to successfully develop, obtain regulatory approval for or commercialize our product candidates, and we are subject to a number of risks that you should be aware of before investing in Celldex. These risks are described more fully in "Item 1A. Risk Factors."

        Using our expertise in immunology, we are building business franchises in major disease areas: oncology, inflammatory and infectious diseases. Each of our business franchises addresses large market opportunities for which current therapies are inadequate or non-existent. We have pursued some of these opportunities independently in a highly focused manner. In other cases, we have leveraged the financial support and development capabilities of corporate and public sector partners to bring our development projects to fruition. The research we have pursued over the past several years has matured into what we believe is an exciting portfolio of product candidates.

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B.    Development Strategy

        We believe there is tremendous untapped potential in immunotherapy that can be exploited through the right combination of therapeutic agents. Our industry has traditionally taken biologics that mediate effective cancer regression in mice and expected similar results in humans. There are many explanations why this strategy often does not succeed, but the most important is that immunotherapy has difficulties when following standard drug development. The mechanism of action is complex, activity is generally not dependent on highest tolerated dose, and patient response is highly variable. Our new understanding of the immune system, cancer's effect on immune mediated mechanisms, and the impact of conventional therapies on the immune system provides a new rationale for combining therapies that may lead to significant clinical responses. The concept of Precision Targeted Immunotherapy is to exploit this knowledge and the availability of good products that may not be sufficiently effective to be commercialized as a monotherapy, but which we believe may be very effective in combination approaches. Our goal is to develop products that maximize the efficacy of immunotherapy regimens through combinations of therapeutic agents. This includes:

        The APC technology:    This is a new class of vaccines based on our proprietary antibody-targeted vaccine technology that is used to generate an immune response against cancer or other diseases.

        Our APC Targeting Technology™ uses human monoclonal antibodies, or mAbs, linked to disease associated antigens to efficiently deliver the attached antigens to immune cells known as antigen presenting cells, or APCs. This technology has been designed to allow us to take advantage of many important characteristics of human monoclonal antibodies, including their long circulating half-life, well known safety profile, and standardized manufacturing procedures. We believe that our APC Targeting Technology™ provides significant manufacturing, regulatory and other practical advantages over patient specific and other immune-based treatments and can substantially reduce the dosage and cost currently required in conventional immunotherapies. Preclinical studies have demonstrated that APC Targeting Technology™ is more effective than conventional non-targeted vaccines. We have developed several proprietary monoclonal antibodies that can independently be developed to generate new product opportunities. We have initiated clinical development with the first APC technology product, called CDX-1307. In addition, CDX-1401 is completing its preclinical development and is expected to begin clinical testing in Phase 1/2 trials during 2009.

        Therapeutic Antibody Programs:    These programs are based on the well validated approach to using antibodies that target to cancer and other diseases directly or through interfering with critical interactions between the patient and the disease. Celldex is in preclinical development for therapeutic human antibodies to molecules important in inflammation and cancer. In addition, Celldex has access through a Research and Commercialization Agreement with Medarex to the UltiMAb® Technology for

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generating fully human monoclonal antibodies. Under this agreement, Celldex can exercise up to ten separate licenses to develop and commercialize therapeutic antibody products, either alone or through collaboration with Celldex licensing partners.

        Immune System Modulators:    Immune system modulators include drugs that activate or suppress specific parts of the immune system, including such molecules as Toll-Like Receptor (TLR) agonists that can activate patients' innate and adaptive immunity, and a complement inhibitor that suppresses inflammatory reactions. These agents further support our Precision Targeted Immunotherapy Platform.

        Celldex's strategy is to utilize our expertise to design and develop targeted immunotherapeutics that have significant and growing market potential; to establish governmental and corporate alliances to fund development; and to commercialize our products either through corporate partners or, in appropriate circumstances, through our own direct selling efforts. Our goal is to demonstrate clinical proof-of-concept for each product, and then seek partners to help see those products which we cannot develop ourselves through to commercialization. This approach allows us to maximize the overall value of our technology and product portfolios while best ensuring the expeditious development of each individual product. Implementation of this strategy is exemplified by our lead programs which are discussed in the following sections.

        Factors that may significantly harm our commercial success, and ultimately the market price of our common stock, include but are not limited to, announcements of technological innovations or new commercial products by our competitors, disclosure of unsuccessful results of clinical testing or regulatory proceedings and governmental approvals, adverse developments in patent or other proprietary rights, public concern about the safety of products developed by Celldex and general economic and market conditions. See "Item 1A. Risk Factors."

C.    Cancer Vaccine Development Programs

        CDX-110:    Our lead clinical development program, CDX-110, is a peptide-based immunotherapy that targets the tumor specific molecule called EGFRvIII, a functional variant of the naturally expressed epidermal growth factor receptor ("EGFR"), a protein which has been well validated as a target for cancer therapy. Unlike EGFR, EGFRvIII is not present in normal tissues, and has been shown to be a transforming oncogene that can directly contribute to the cancer cell growth.

        EGFRvIII is commonly present in glioblastoma multiforme, or GBM, the most common and aggressive form of brain cancer, and has also been observed in various other cancers such as breast, ovarian, prostate, colorectal, and head & neck cancer. Our partner, Pfizer Inc. ("Pfizer"), and we are currently pursuing the development of CDX-110 for GBM therapy and plan to expand the clinical development into other cancers through additional clinical studies.

        Initial clinical development of EGFRvIII immunotherapy was led by collaborating investigators at the Brain Center at Duke Comprehensive Cancer Center in Durham, North Carolina and at M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, Texas. The results from the Phase 1 (VICTORI) and Phase 2a (ACTIVATE) studies, which enrolled 16 and 21 patients, respectively, have demonstrated a significant increase in the time to disease progression (greater than 113%) in the patients who were vaccinated, and also in overall survival rates (greater than 100%), both relative to appropriately matched historical controls. An extension of the Phase 2a program (ACT II) at the same two institutions has enrolled 23 additional GBM patients treated in combination with temozolomide (the current standard of care). Preliminary results from this study (ACT II) currently estimates median overall survival to be 33.1 months, although the median has not yet been reached. The survival of a matched historical control group was 14.3 months and a subgroup treated with temozolomide (TMZ) of 15.2 months, with a p value = 0.0078. Overall time to progression for CDX-110 was 16.6 months compared with 6.4 months for the historical control group.

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        In May 2007, we initiated a Phase 2b/3 randomized study (ACT III) of CDX-110 combined with standard of care, temozolomide, versus standard of care alone in patients with GBM. We have opened a total of over 30 sites in the United States for the study. The FDA has granted orphan drug designation for CDX-110 for the treatment of EGFRvIII expressing GBM as well as fast track designation.

        In December 2008, we announced an amendment to convert the ACT III study to a single-arm Phase 2 clinical trial in which all patients will receive CDX-110 in combination with temozolomide and we will continue to enroll to approximately 60 patients. The decision, which follows the recommendation of the Independent Data Monitoring Committee, was based on the observation that the majority of patients randomized to the control (standard of care) arm withdrew from this open-label study after being randomized to the control arm. Patients currently participating on the control arm of the study will be offered the option to receive treatment with CDX-110. Under this amendment, the ACT III study will provide a multi-center, non-randomized dataset for CDX-110 in patients with newly diagnosed GBM. These data will provide important additional information that can be used to better design the future development of CDX-110.

        On April 16, 2008, the Company and Pfizer entered into a License and Development Agreement (the "Pfizer Agreement") under which Pfizer was granted an exclusive worldwide license to a therapeutic cancer vaccine candidate, CDX-110, in Phase 2 development for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme. The Pfizer Agreement also gives Pfizer exclusive rights to the use of EGFRvIII vaccines in other potential indications. Under the Pfizer Agreement, Pfizer made an upfront payment to the Company of $40 million and made a $10 million equity investment in the Company. Pfizer will fund all development costs for these programs. The Company is also eligible to receive potential milestone payments exceeding $390 million for the successful development and commercialization of CDX-110 and additional EGFRvIII vaccine products, as well as royalties on any product sales. The Pfizer Agreement became effective after clearance under the Hart-Scott-Rodino Antitrust Improvements Act of 1976 (as amended) on May 19, 2008.

        CDX-1307:    The Company's lead APC Targeting Technology™ product candidate, CDX-1307, is in development for the treatment of epithelial tumors such as colorectal, pancreatic, bladder, ovarian and breast cancers. CDX-1307 targets the beta chain of human chorionic gonadotropin, known as hCG-Beta, which is an antigen often found in epithelial tumors. The presence of hCG-Beta in these cancers correlates with a poor clinical outcome, suggesting that this molecule may contribute to tumor growth. Normal adult tissues have minimal expression of hCG-Beta; therefore, targeted immune responses are not expected to generate significant side effects.

        Celldex is completing two Phase 1 studies of CDX-1307 at multiple centers that are designed to explore safety and dose/effect relationships via two administration routes—intradermal (ID), a traditional vaccine route that allows efficient access to local dermal dendritic cells and intravenous (IV), a novel systemic approach to vaccination that might target a much larger population of dendritic cells. In both studies, there are dose escalations of CDX-1307 alone and CDX-1307 with the adjuvant GM-CSF (known to increase mannose receptor expression on dendritic cells). At the highest dose levels, additional immune system modulators (Toll-Like Receptor Agonists, or TLR agonists) have been added to determine what effect they have in augmenting an immune response. Patients with an assortment of different tumor types that are known to express hCG-Beta are being accrued with retrospective analysis for hCG-Beta expression. A four dose regimen is utilized with the possibility of retreatment if patients demonstrate tumor regression or stable disease.

        Over Fifty (50) patients with epithelial cancers have been treated in the Phase 1 clinical trials and more than half have evidence of hCG-Beta expression by their tumor. The immunotherapy has been well tolerated with only minor adverse events observed (reddening at the injection site). Analysis of the initial cohorts with GM-CSF have revealed that several patients developed good humoral responses to

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hCG-Beta, and some have demonstrated enhancement of circulating hCG-Beta-specific CD8 T cells. Thus, we are encouraged that CDX-1307 is providing similar results as predicted in the pre-clinical studies. In addition, one patient with pancreatic cancer had a 26% overall reduction in tumor burden and two breast cancer patients were stable for six months during treatment. The investigators at the Duke Comprehensive Cancer Center were awarded a two year $500,000 grant from the Avon Foundation and the National Cancer Institute to support Phase 1 work in breast cancer. The safety of CDX-1307 in combination with defined immune system modulators is now being evaluated with intent to enter Phase 2 clinical research in the second half of 2009.

        CDX-1401:    CDX-1401 is a fusion protein consisting of a fully human monoclonal antibody with specificity for the dendritic cell receptor, DEC-205, linked to the NY-ESO-1 tumor antigen. In humans, NY-ESO-1 is one of the most immunogenic tumor antigens and has been detected in 20 - 30% of cancers, thus representing a broad opportunity. This product is intended to selectively deliver the NY-ESO-1 antigen to APCs for generating robust immune responses against cancer cells expressing NY-ESO-1. Unlike CDX-1307, which targets the mannose receptor expressing dendritic cells, CDX-1401 is the first APC product targeting DEC-205 expressing dendritic cells. We are developing CDX-1401 for the treatment of malignant melanoma and a variety of solid tumors which express the proprietary cancer antigen NY-ESO-1, which the Company licensed from the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research in 2006. The Company believes that preclinical studies have shown that CDX-1401 is effective for activation of human T-cell responses against NY-ESO-1. The IND filing is planned for the first half of 2009. We expect to be able to enter a Phase 1 study with a combination regimen, including TLRs, and will accrue multiple tumors that express NY-ESO-1.

        CDX-1127: Celldex has entered into a License Agreement with the University of Southampton, UK, to develop human antibodies to CD27, a potentially important target for immunotherapy of various cancers. In pre-clinical models, antibodies to CD27 alone have been shown to mediate anti-tumor effects, and may be particularly effective in combination with other immunotherapies. CD27 is a critical molecule in the activation pathway of lymphocytes. It is downstream from CD40, and may provide a novel way to regulate the immune responses. Engaging CD27 with the appropriate monoclonal antibody has proven highly effective at promoting anti-cancer immunity in mouse models. We are currently evaluating new human monoclonal antibodies in pre-clinical models.

D.    Inflammatory Disease Development Programs

        CDX-1135 (formerly TP10):    We have been developing immunotherapeutics that inhibit a part of the immune system called the complement system. The complement system is a series of proteins that are important initiators of the body's acute inflammatory response against disease, infection and injury. Excessive complement activation also plays a role in some persistent inflammatory conditions. Our lead compound, CDX-1135, a soluble form of naturally occurring Complement Receptor 1, has effectively shown to inhibit the activation of the complement cascade in animal models and in human clinical trials. We believe that regulating the complement system could have therapeutic and prophylactic applications in several acute and chronic conditions, including organ transplantation, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, age-related macular degeneration ("AMD"), atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome and myasthenia gravis. We are currently defining the most appropriate clinical development path for CDX-1135 and are focusing on rare disease conditions of unregulated complement activation as potentially the fastest route to FDA approval.

        CDX-1189:    Celldex is developing therapeutic human antibodies to a signaling molecule known as CD89 or Fca receptor type I (FcaRI). CD89 is expressed by some white blood cells and leukemic cell lines, and has been shown to be important in controlling inflammation and tumor growth in animal models. Celldex has proprietary, fully human antibodies to CD89 in preclinical development. Depending upon the specific antibody used, anti-CD89 antibodies can either be activating and thus stimulate immune responses, or down-regulating and act as an anti-inflammatory agent.

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E.    Infectious Disease Development Programs

        CholeraGarde® Vaccine:    CholeraGarde® is designed to be a safe, effective single-dose, oral cholera vaccine. Our partner, the International Vaccine Institute ("IVI"), has received $21 million in funding from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation for a Cholera Vaccine Initiative ("CHOVI"), which includes conducting further clinical trials of CholeraGarde®. The IVI is presently conducting a Phase 2 clinical trial of CholeraGarde in Bangladesh, with plans to sponsor additional Phase 2 studies in India and Thailand beginning in the first half of 2009, followed by Phase 3 field studies.

        ETEC Vaccine:    In November 2007, we entered into an agreement with the Division of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases of the NIAID, whereby NIAID is sponsoring a Phase 1 study of Celldex's investigational single-dose, oral vaccine designed to offer combined protection against both enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) and cholera. In June 2008, NIAID initiated the Phase 1 trial of the ETEC vaccine candidate at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center.

        In January 2009, we entered into an Exclusive License and Development Agreement with Vaccine Technologies, Inc. ("VTI"). Under the license agreement, Celldex has granted a worldwide fee- and royalty-bearing exclusive license to VTI to development and commercialize Celldex's CholeraGarde® and ETEC vaccine programs. Financial terms of the agreement with VTI include an upfront license fee, milestone payments and royalties on net sales of licensed products during the term of the agreement.

        Ty800 Typhoid Fever Vaccine:    The Company has developed an oral vaccine to offer rapid, single-dose protection against Salmonella typhi, the cause of typhoid fever. Ty800 is targeted for both the travelers' market and global health needs. In 2006, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease ("NIAID") of the National Institutes of Health ("NIH") initiated a Phase 1/2 in-patient dose-ranging clinical trial aimed at demonstrating the safety and immunogenicity of the Ty800 typhoid fever vaccine. NIAID funded the production of Ty800 vaccine for clinical testing and completed the Phase 1/2 trial at a NIH-funded clinical site in 2007. Results showed the single-dose, oral vaccine to be well tolerated and immunogenic, with over 90% of vaccinated subjects generating immune responses. We initiated our own sponsored Phase 2 trial of Ty800 in July 2007. Preliminary results reported in April 2008 from the study showed that the single-dose, oral vaccine was well tolerated and immunogenic, demonstrating that the desired immune response was achieved. Incidence of reactogenicity symptoms and adverse events post-vaccination were similar to placebo. Importantly, immunogenic response was dose-dependent. Positive immune response or seroconversion (prospectively defined as a 4-fold increase in anti-LPS titers over pre-dose level) rates were 65.5% (36/55) and 80% (44/55) in the low and high dose groups, respectively, and was significantly (p<0.001) higher than placebo.

        CDX-2401:    The Company is also using its APC Targeting Technology™ to develop vaccines against infectious disease. The lead program is CDX-2401, an APC-Targeting prophylactic vaccine, aimed at providing protection from infection with HIV, the virus known to cause AIDS. This program is in a Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation funded partnership with collaborators at Rockefeller University in New York City, who have shown in model systems that protective immunity can be induced with such a vaccine. Preclinical studies and manufacturing development are in progress and the Company, with its collaborators, plans to file an IND for Phase 1 clinical studies in the first half of 2009.

F.     Marketed Products

        Rotavirus Vaccine:    Rotavirus is a major cause of diarrhea and vomiting in infants and children. In 1997, we licensed our oral rotavirus strain to GlaxoSmithKline ("Glaxo"). All of the ongoing development for this program is being conducted and funded by Glaxo. Glaxo gained approval for its

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rotavirus vaccine, Rotarix®, in Mexico in July 2004, which represented the first in a series of worldwide approvals and commercial launches for the product. Glaxo subsequently launched Rotarix® in additional Latin American and Asian Pacific countries during 2005 - 2007. Additionally, Glaxo filed for market approval with the European regulatory authorities in late 2004, which triggered a $2 million milestone payment to the Company. In February 2006, the European Commission granted approval of Rotarix® in the European Union, which triggered a $4 million milestone payment from Glaxo. On April 3, 2008, Rotarix® received approval from the FDA for the prevention of rotavirus gastroenteritis in infants. FDA approval triggered a $1.5 million milestone payment from Glaxo, of which $750,000 was retained by the Company. We licensed-in the rotavirus strain in 1995 and owe a license fee of 30% to Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center ("CCH") on net royalties received from Glaxo. In May 2005, the Company entered into an agreement whereby an affiliate of Paul Royalty Fund ("PRF") purchased an interest in the net royalties the Company will receive on worldwide sales of Rotarix® (see Note 10 of our consolidated financial statements). The market launch of Rotarix® by Glaxo in the U.S. market during the quarter ended September 30, 2008 resulted in a $10 million milestone payment to the Company from PRF, which the Company received on October 1, 2008. We have received a total of $60 million in milestone payments under the PRF agreement. No additional milestone payments are due from PRF under the agreement.

        In September 2006, we received notice from Glaxo that Glaxo would begin paying royalties on sales of Rotarix® vaccine at the lower of two royalty rates under their 1997 license agreement. Glaxo's decision to pay the lower royalty rate (which is 70% of the full rate) is based upon Glaxo's assertion that Rotarix® is not covered by the patents Glaxo licensed from the Company in Australia and certain European countries. If Glaxo's position stands, the royalties to which PRF is entitled will no longer be limited by a $27.5 million annual threshold, which the Company projected may have been reached in later years as sales of Rotarix® increased. Irrespective of Glaxo's position, we will still retain approximately 65% of the royalties on worldwide sales of Rotarix® once PRF receives 2.45 times the aggregate cash payments of $60 million it made to the Company, though the potential amount of such residual royalties will be lower if Glaxo's position stands.

        Megan®Vac 1 and Megan®Egg Vaccines: On December 1, 2000, the Company acquired all of the outstanding capital stock of Megan. Megan has commercialized three veterinary vaccines; Argus™ SC, licensed by the United States Department of Agriculture ("USDA") in March 1998 and marketed by Intervet, Inc., and Megan®Vac 1 and Megan®Egg, licensed by the USDA in November 1998 and 2003, respectively, and marketed by Lohmann Animal Health International ("LAHI"). In January 2009, we sold the poultry vaccines business, consisting of Megan®Vac 1 and Megan®Egg, to LAHI for an upfront fee and potential milestone payments.

G.    Product Development and Licensing Agreements

1.     GlaxoSmithKline plc and Paul Royalty Fund II, L.P.

        In 1997, the Company entered into an agreement with Glaxo to collaborate on the development and commercialization of our oral rotavirus strain and Glaxo assumed responsibility for all subsequent clinical trials and all other development activities. We licensed-in the rotavirus strain that was used to develop Glaxo's Rotarix® rotavirus vaccine in 1995 and owe a license fee of 30% to CCH on net royalties received from Glaxo. We are obligated to maintain a license with CCH with respect to the Glaxo agreement. All licensing fees are included in research and development expense. The term of the Glaxo agreement is through the expiration of the last of the relevant patents covered by the agreement, although Glaxo may terminate the agreement upon 90 days prior written notice.

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        In May 2005, the Company entered into an agreement whereby an affiliate of PRF purchased an interest in the net royalties the Company will receive on worldwide sales of Rotarix®. Under the PRF agreement, the Company will retain 50% of future Glaxo milestone payments beginning on the effective date of the agreement with PRF, with 70% of the remaining balance payable to PRF and 30% of the remaining balance payable to CCH, respectively. The Company's retained interests in Rotarix® net royalties which were not sold to PRF are recorded as product royalty revenue and a corresponding amount that is payable to CCH is recorded as royalty expense, which is included in research and development expense.

        On April 3, 2008, Rotarix® received FDA market approval for the prevention of rotavirus gastroenteritis in infants, which triggered a $1.5 million milestone payment to the Company from Glaxo, $750,000 of which the Company retained under its agreement with PRF. In connection with the Company's purchase accounting for the Merger, the present value of the Company's retained amount, or $742,300, had been recorded as a current asset as of March 31, 2008. During the quarter ended June 30, 2008, the Company also recorded $225,000 in revenue and an offsetting amount in royalty expense for the payable due to CCH for its portion of the Glaxo milestone. The market launch of Rotarix® by Glaxo in the U.S. market during the quarter ended September 30, 2008 resulted in a $10 million milestone payment to the Company from PRF, which the Company received on October 1, 2008. As of March 31, 2008, the Company had recorded the expected present value of the $10 million milestone payment due from PRF of $9,053,200, the purchase accounting value assigned to the PRF milestone payment at the time of the Merger. During the quarter ended September 30, 2008, the Company recognized the balance of $946,800 as other income in the consolidated statement of operations. We have received $60 million in total milestone payments under the PRF agreement. No additional milestone payments are due from PRF under the agreement.

        Royalty rates on Rotarix® escalate from 7% to 10% based on net product sales in countries that have valid patent protection. These royalty rates are discounted by 30% for "non-patent" countries (primarily international markets). In September 2006, the Company received notice from Glaxo that Glaxo would begin paying royalties on sales of Rotarix® vaccine at the lower of the two royalty rates under their 1997 license agreement. Glaxo's decision to pay the lower royalty rate (which is 70% of the full rate) is based upon Glaxo's assertion that Rotarix® is not covered by the patents Glaxo licensed from the Company in Australia and certain European countries. If Glaxo's position stands, the royalties to which PRF is entitled will no longer be limited by a $27.5 million annual threshold, which the Company projected may have been reached in later years as sales of Rotarix® increased. Irrespective of Glaxo's position, the Company will still retain approximately 65% of the royalties on worldwide sales of Rotarix® once PRF receives 2.45 times the aggregate cash payments of $60 million it made to Celldex, though the potential amount of such residual royalties will be lower if Glaxo's position stands.

2.     GlaxoSmithKline plc and Corixa Corporation ("Corixa")

        On December 21, 2005, Corixa, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Glaxo, and Celldex Ltd. (formerly Lorantis Limited), entered into a termination agreement of their collaboration of CDX-2101, or HepVax, for the development of a therapeutic vaccine for Hepatitis B (the "Termination Agreement"). Under the terms of the Termination Agreement, Glaxo paid the Company the sum of approximately $1,632,000. In addition, and subject to the terms and conditions of the Termination Agreement, Glaxo granted to the Company a worldwide, fully paid up, royalty-free, perpetual, nonexclusive license under the Corixa Patent Rights, Corixa Know-How Rights and Corixa Licensed Technology (each as defined in the Termination Agreement): (a) to use RC-529SE in products being developed and/or commercialized by Celldex Ltd or its Permitted Sublicensees in the Lorantis Field; and (b) to make or have made RC-529SE using RC-529 adjuvant for the limited use permitted by the license granted to reformulate Corixa's proprietary adjuvant.

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3.     Pfizer Inc.

        Pfizer License and Development Agreement:    On April 16, 2008, the Company and Pfizer entered into a License and Development Agreement (the "Pfizer Agreement") under which Pfizer was granted an exclusive worldwide license to a therapeutic cancer vaccine candidate, CDX-110, in Phase 2 development for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme. The Pfizer Agreement also gives Pfizer exclusive rights to the use of EGFRvIII vaccines in other potential indications. Under the Pfizer Agreement, Pfizer made an upfront payment to the Company of $40 million and made a $10 million equity investment in the Company. Pfizer will fund all development costs for these programs. The Company is also eligible to receive potential milestone payments exceeding $390 million for the successful development and commercialization of CDX-110 and additional EGFRvIII vaccine products, as well as royalties on any product sales. The Pfizer Agreement became effective after clearance under the Hart-Scott-Rodino Antitrust Improvements Act of 1976 (as amended) on May 19, 2008.

        On May 27, 2008, the Company received $10 million from Pfizer in exchange for 781,250 shares of the Company's common stock having a fair value of $10,867,188, or $13.91 per share, on that date. The $867,188 over the amount received from Pfizer was recorded as a reduction to deferred revenue of the $40 million upfront payment received from Pfizer on June 18, 2008.

        The Company has applied the provisions of Emerging Issues Task Force (EITF) Issue No. 00-21 ("EITF 00-21"), Accounting for Revenue Arrangements with Multiple Deliverables, and determined that its performance obligations under this collaboration should be accounted for as a single unit of accounting. The Company's deliverables under this collaboration primarily include an exclusive license to its CDX-110 product candidate and its EGFRvIII technologies, research and development services as required under the collaboration and participation in the joint clinical development committee. The Company has estimated that its performance period under the collaboration will be 9.5 years based on an assessment of the period over which the Company will have met its performance obligations under the collaboration. Revenue, including research and development reimbursements, is being recognized on a straight-line basis over this period using the Contingency Adjusted Performance Model ("CAPM"). The $40,000,000 up-front payment was recorded as deferred revenue and this amount, less the $867,188 in excess fair value for the Company's common stock discussed above, is being amortized over the 9.5-year performance period at a rate of $1,029,810 per quarter.

        The agreement also provides for reimbursement by Pfizer of all costs incurred by the Company in connection with the collaboration since the effective date. The Company invoices Pfizer monthly for its reimbursable costs and records the invoiced amount as deferred revenue. These deferred revenue amounts are amortized to revenue over the expected 9.5-year performance period on a straight-line basis using the CAPM model.

        In connection with the initial deliverables under the Pfizer Agreement as discussed further in Note 11, the Company has paid a sublicense fee of $2,365,174 to each of two research universities, Duke University ("Duke") and Thomas Jefferson University ("TJU"), and paid TJU an additional license fee of $500,000. In October 2008, the Company paid an additional sublicense fee to TJU of $1,634,826. These payments were recorded as deferred costs in the "Other Assets" line item in the consolidated balance sheet and are being amortized over the 9.5-year performance period at a rate of $180,663 per quarter.

        Pfizer Animal Health Agreement:    The Company entered into a licensing agreement in December 2000 with Pfizer's Animal Health Division whereby Pfizer has licensed Megan's technology for the development of animal health and food safety vaccines. Under the agreement, the Company may receive additional milestone payments of up to $3 million based upon attainment of specified milestones. The Company may receive royalty payments on eventual product sales. The term of this agreement is through the expiration of the last of the patents covered by the agreement. The Company has no obligation to incur any research and development costs in connection with this agreement.

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        As of June 1, 2006, the Company entered into a Collaborative Research and Development Agreement with Pfizer aimed at the discovery and development of vaccines to protect animals. In 2007, further funded work at the Company on the joint research program was terminated by Pfizer after the Company provided two of four deliverables to Pfizer.

4.     Rockefeller University ("Rockefeller")

        The Company is developing a vaccine, CDX-2401, aimed at providing protection from infection with HIV, the virus known to cause AIDS. This program is in a Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation funded partnership with collaborators at Rockefeller and the Aaron Diamond AIDS Research Center, who have shown in model systems that protective immunity can be induced with such a vaccine. Preclinical studies and manufacturing development are in progress and payments to the Company are made on a time and materials basis.

5.     Vaccine Technologies, Inc. ("VTI")

        In January 2009, we entered into an Exclusive License and Development Agreement with VTI. Under the license agreement, Celldex has granted a worldwide fee- and royalty-bearing exclusive license to VTI to development and commercialize Celldex's CholeraGarde® and ETEC vaccine programs. Financial terms of the agreement with VTI include an upfront license fee, milestone payments and royalties on net sales of licensed products during the term of the agreement.

        We depend on our collaborative relationships and may enter into more of them in the future. Some of the above referenced agreements give our collaborator substantial responsibility to commercialize a product and to make decisions about the amount and timing of resources that are devoted to developing and commercializing a product. As a result, we do not have complete control over how resources are used toward some of our products.

        In addition, some of these agreements relate to products in the early stages of research and development. Others require Celldex and our collaborator to jointly decide on the feasibility of developing a particular product using our technologies. In either case, these agreements may terminate without benefit to us if the underlying products are not fully developed. If we fail to meet our obligations under these agreements, they could terminate and we might need to enter into relationships with other collaborators and to spend additional time, money, and other valuable resources in the process.

        Moreover, we cannot predict whether our collaborators will continue their development efforts or, if they do, whether their efforts will achieve success. Many of our collaborators face the same kinds of risks and uncertainties in their business that we face. A delay or setback to a collaborator will, at a minimum, delay the commercialization of any affected products, and may ultimately prevent it. Moreover, any collaborator could breach its agreement with us or otherwise not use best efforts to promote our products. A collaborator may choose to pursue alternative technologies or products that compete with our technologies or products. In either case, if a collaborator failed to successfully develop one of our products, we would need to find another collaborator. Our ability to do so would depend upon our legal right to do so at the time and whether the product remained commercially viable.

H.    Research Collaboration and Licensing Agreements

        Celldex has entered into licensing agreements with several universities and research organizations. Under the terms of these agreements, we have received licenses or options to license technology, specified patents or patent applications.

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1.     Medarex, Inc.

        The Company and Medarex have entered into an Assignment and License Agreement that provides for the assignment of certain patent and other intellectual property rights and a license to certain Medarex technology and a Research and Commercialization Agreement which provides the Company with certain rights to obtain exclusive commercial licenses to proprietary monoclonal antibodies raised against certain antigens. Under these agreements with Medarex, Celldex may be obligated to pay license fees, milestone payments and royalties relating to the development and regulatory approval of certain of its technologies.

        Under the terms of the Research and Commercialization Agreement with Medarex, Celldex will be required to pay Medarex license fees to obtain commercial licenses for antibodies arising from research licenses granted by Medarex. Celldex will also be required to pay Medarex milestone payments with respect to the development of any products containing such licensed antibodies. These fees and milestones may total up to $7 to $10 million per licensed antibody if a product containing such licensed antibody receives approval from the FDA and/or equivalent foreign agencies. None of Celldex's product candidates currently under development trigger such milestone payments. In general, potential milestone payments for Celldex's antibody product candidates may or may not be triggered and may vary in size depending on a number of variables, almost all of which are currently uncertain. Typically, the events that trigger these payments per product candidate include:

        In addition, Celldex will be required to pay royalties on any sales of products containing licensed antibodies. The royalties will be payable on a country-by-country and product-by-product basis until the date which is the later of: (i) the expiration of the last-to-expire of the Medarex patents covering the product in such country or (ii) the tenth anniversary of the first commercial sale of a product in such country. Celldex will also be responsible for the payment of any royalties, license fees and milestone and other payments due to third parties if Celldex licenses any additional technology in order to commercialize such products.

        To date, Celldex has not made any royalty payments on sales of any products and believes it is at least a number of years away from selling any products that would require Celldex to make any such royalty payments. Whether Celldex will be obligated to make milestone or royalty payments in the future is subject to the success of Celldex's product development efforts and, accordingly, is inherently uncertain.

2.     Rockefeller University

        On November 1, 2005, the Company and Rockefeller entered into a license agreement for the exclusive worldwide rights to human DEC-205 receptor, with the right to sublicense the technology. The license grant is exclusive except that Rockefeller may use and permit other nonprofit organizations to use the human DEC-205 receptor patent rights for educational and research purposes. In addition, the Company acknowledges that Rockefeller has granted Howard Hughes Medical Institute ("HHMI") a paid-up, nonexclusive, irrevocable license to use the patent rights, biological materials, and technical information for HHMI's research purposes, but with no right to sublicense. The Company may also be required to pay royalties on any product sales. The royalties will be payable on a country-by-country and licensed product-by-licensed product basis until the date which is the later of (i) the expiration of

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the last to expire of the patents covering the licensed product in such country or (ii) ten years following the first commercial sale of a licensed product in such country.

        The Company may be required to pay license fees and milestone payments to Rockefeller with respect to development of the human DEC-205 receptor. These fees and milestones may total up to $2 million to $4 million per product candidate that receives approval from the FDA and equivalent foreign agencies.

3.     Duke University Brain Tumor Cancer Center

        On September 1, 2006, the Company and Duke University Brain Tumor Cancer Center of Duke University ("Duke") entered into a license agreement that gave the Company access and reference to the clinical data generated by Duke and its collaborators in order for the Company to generate its own filing with the FDA relating to its CDX-110 product.

        In exchange for referencing all the Duke data, the Company paid Duke a one-time upfront payment of $175,000 and issued to Duke 100,000 shares of the Company's common stock, which the Company recorded in 2006 as a licensing expense in research and development. The estimated aggregate fair value of the common shares issued was $330,000.

        The Company may be required to pay license fees and milestone payments to Duke with respect to development of the CDX-110 product. These fees and milestones may total up to $1.2 million if CDX-110 receives approval from the FDA and equivalent foreign agencies. The Company may also be required to pay royalties upon approval of CDX-110. The royalties will be payable on a country-by-country and licensed product-by-licensed product basis until the date of the expiration of the last to expire of the patents covering the licensed product in such country.

        In connection with the Pfizer Agreement discussed in Note 10, the Company determined that $2,365,174 was payable to Duke as a sublicense fee. As agreed by Duke, at the Company's option, 50% of this amount was paid to Duke in the form of 81,512 shares of common stock in October 2008.

4.     Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research

        On October 20, 2006, the Company and Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research ("Ludwig") entered into an agreement for the nonexclusive rights to six cancer tumor targets for use in combination with the Company's APC Targeting Technology. The term of the agreement is for ten years. As consideration for the nonexclusive license, the Company agreed to pay an annual license fee of $7,500 and $2,500 for each full-length antigen and partial-length antigen, respectively, until such antigens enter a randomized Phase 1 clinical trial.

        As additional consideration for the nonexclusive license, the Company may be required to pay license fees and milestone payments to Ludwig for the use of the cancer targets in combination with the Company's technology. The fees and milestones may total up to $1.5 million to $2.5 million on a product candidate that receives approval from the FDA and equivalent foreign agencies. The Company may also be required to pay royalties upon approval of any product candidate. The royalties will be payable on a country-by-country and licensed product-by-licensed product basis until the date of the expiration of the last to expire of the patents covering the licensed product in such country.

5.     Thomas Jefferson University

        In February 2003, as part of its acquisition of the EGFR VIII technology from Alteris Therapeutics, Inc., the Company entered into three exclusive license agreements with Thomas Jefferson University ("TJU"). Under the license agreements, TJU has granted a worldwide fee-and royalty-bearing exclusive license. Under these licenses, the Company will be obligated to pay TJU milestone payments which may total up to $3 million for the first licensed product developed during the term of

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the license agreements, an annual license fee of $45,000, patent and other expenses associated with licenses, as well as royalties on net sales of licensed products during the term of the license agreements. The Company also issued 100,000 shares of its common stock to TJU. In the event that TJU provides notice of default and the default is not cured within 60 days of such notice, TJU may terminate the license agreements. In connection with the Pfizer Agreement, the Company amended its licenses with TJU to add additional sublicensing rights and made a $500,000 one-time license payment to TJU in June 2008.

        As discussed in Note 10, the Company paid a sublicense fee of $2,365,174 to TJU during the quarter ended September 30, 2008 and paid an additional sublicense fee of $1,634,826 to TJU in October 2008.

6.     Select Vaccines Limited

        In February 2007, the Company entered into a research and development partnership with Select Vaccines Limited ("Select Vaccines"), a public Australian biotechnology company, focused on the use of Select Vaccines' virus-like particles ("VLPs") as a platform technology for the development of viral vaccines. Under the terms of the agreement, the Company made an upfront equity investment of $735,000 in Select Vaccines and agreed to fund influenza vaccine research and development for two years, as well as provide payments to Select Vaccines for the achievement of specific preclinical and clinical development milestones. On November 1, 2007, the Company notified Select Vaccines that, effective December 31, 2007, the Company was exercising its rights to terminate its Collaboration and License Agreement with Select Vaccines for strategic reasons. In August 2008, the Company sold its equity investment in Select Vaccine shares and recorded net proceeds of $250,882.

7.     3M Company

        On June 11, 2008, the Company and 3M Company entered into a license agreement for the exclusive worldwide rights to access 3M Company's proprietary Immune Response Modifier Resiquimod™ (and additional Toll-Like Receptor 7/8 agonists ("TLRs")) for clinical study with Celldex's proprietary APC Targeting Technology, for use as vaccine adjuvants, with the right to sublicense the technology.

        The Company paid 3M Company a one-time upfront license fee which was charged to research and development expense in the quarter ended June 30, 2008. The Company may be required to pay annual license fees and milestone payments to 3M Company with respect to development of Resiquimod™. The Company may also be required to pay royalties upon approval of any product candidate. The royalties will be payable on a country-by-country and licensed product-by-licensed product basis until the date of the expiration of the last to expire of the patents covering the licensed product in such country.

8.     University of Southampton

        In November 2008, the Company entered into an Exclusive Patent and Know-How License Agreement with the University of Southampton, UK, ("Southampton") to develop human antibodies towards CD27, a potentially important target for immunotherapy of various cancers. CD27 is a critical molecule in the activation pathway of lymphocytes, is downstream from CD40, and may provide a novel way to regulate the immune responses. In pre-clinical models, antibodies to CD27 have been shown to mediate anti-tumor effects alone, and may be particularly effective in combination with the Company's other immunotherapies.

        The Company paid Southampton a one-time upfront license fee which was charged to research and development expense in the quarter ended December 31, 2008. The Company may be required to pay annual license fees and milestone payments to Southampton with respect to development of CD27.

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The Company may also be required to pay royalties upon approval of any product candidate. The royalties will be payable on a country-by-country and licensed product-by-licensed product basis until the date of the expiration of the last to expire of the patents covering the licensed product in such country.

        We depend on our collaborative relationships and may enter into more of them in the future. Some of the above referenced agreements give our collaborator substantial responsibility to make decisions about the amount and timing of resources that are devoted to developing a product. As a result, we do not have complete control over how resources are used toward some of our products.

        Some of these agreements relate to products in the early stages of research and development and may require Celldex and our collaborator to jointly decide on the feasibility of developing a particular product using our technologies. In either case, these agreements may terminate without benefit to us if the underlying products are not fully developed. Moreover, once specific products are chosen for development, the agreements relating to them may require Celldex to meet specified milestones, to invest money and other resources in the development process or to negotiate additional licenses and other agreements, which may not be possible or advantageous. If we fail to meet our obligations under these agreements, they could terminate and we might need to enter into relationships with other collaborators and to spend additional time, money, and other valuable resources in the process.

        Moreover, we cannot predict whether our collaborators will continue their development efforts or, if they do, whether their efforts will achieve success. Many of our collaborators face the same kinds of risks and uncertainties in their business that we face. A delay or setback to a collaborator will, at a minimum, delay the commercialization of any affected products, and may ultimately prevent it. Moreover, any collaborator could breach its agreement with us or otherwise not use best efforts to promote our products. A collaborator may choose to pursue alternative technologies or products that compete with our technologies or products. In either case, if a collaborator failed to successfully develop one of our products, we would need to find another collaborator. Our ability to do so would depend upon our legal right to do so at the time and whether the product remained commercially viable.

I.     Competition

        The biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries are intensely competitive and subject to rapid and significant technological change. Many of the products that Celldex is attempting to develop and commercialize will be competing with existing therapies. In addition, a number of companies are pursuing the development of pharmaceuticals that target the same diseases and conditions that Celldex is targeting. Celldex faces competition from pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies both in the United States and abroad. Celldex's competitors may utilize discovery technologies and techniques or partner with collaborators in order to develop products more rapidly or successfully than Celldex or its collaborators are able to do. Many of Celldex's competitors, particularly large pharmaceutical companies, have substantially greater financial, technical and human resources than Celldex does. In addition, academic institutions, government agencies and other public and private organizations conducting research may seek patent protection with respect to potentially competitive products or technologies and may establish exclusive collaborative or licensing relationships with Celldex's competitors.

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        Several pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies are actively engaged in research and development in areas related to therapeutic vaccines, including Alexion, Antigenics, Baxter, Crucell, Dendreon, Emergent, GlaxoSmithKline, Intercell, Sanofi-Aventis, Maxygen, Merck, NeoPharm, Novavax, Pfizer, Roche, Genitope, Northwest Biotherapeutics, Vical, Anadys, Idera, and Cell Genesys. Celldex is aware that Genitope, Northwest Biotherapeutics and Dendreon are in late stage clinical trials for therapeutic vaccines for the treatment of lymphoma, GBM, melanoma and prostate cancer, respectively, which may compete with CDX-1307, CDX-110 and CDX-1401. In addition, companies such as ImClone, Inc. with its approved product Erbitux™ for the treatment of colorectal cancer, and Genentech, Inc. with its product Herceptin® for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer, have already commercialized antibody-based products that may compete with CDX-1307, CDX-1401 and CDX-110. Various other companies are developing or commercializing products in areas that Celldex has targeted for product development. Some of these products use therapeutic approaches that may compete directly with Celldex's product candidates. Many of these companies and institutions, either alone or together with their partners, have substantially greater financial resources and larger research and development staffs than Celldex does. These companies may succeed in obtaining approvals from the Food and Drug Administration ("FDA") and foreign regulatory authorities for their products sooner than Celldex does for its products.

        Celldex is aware of a number of competitive products currently available in the marketplace or under development that are used for the prevention and treatment of the diseases that Celldex has targeted for product development. Various companies are currently marketing or developing biopharmaceutical products that may compete with Celldex's product candidates that target colorectal cancer. Product candidates Celldex may develop are also subject to competition in the treatment of colorectal cancer from a number of products already approved and on the market, including the following chemotherapy products: AstraZeneca PLC's Tomudex®, Hoffman-LaRoche's Xeloda® (capecitabine), Immunex Corporation's Leucovorin® calcium, ImClone Systems' Erbitux™, Pfizer, Inc.'s Camptosar® (irinotecan) and Aduracil® (5-FU), Sanofi-Synthelabo Group's Eloxatin™ (oxaliplatin), Genentech's anti-VEGF antibody, Avastin™, GlaxoSmithKline's Eniluracil™, and Titan Pharmaceuticals' CeaVac™, in the treatment of patients with advanced-stage colorectal cancer. In addition, Celldex is aware that other companies such as Cell Genesys and Dendreon may be developing additional cancer vaccines that could potentially compete with other Celldex product candidates. Celldex may also face competition from Medarex and Bristol-Myers Squibb, which are developing a therapeutic vaccine for the treatment of melanoma using Medarex's MDX-010 product candidate. Celldex also faces competition from a number of companies working in the fields of anti-angiogenesis and specific active immunotherapy for the treatment of solid tumor cancers. Celldex expects that competition among specific active immunotherapy and anti-angiogenesis products approved for sale will be based on various factors, including product efficacy, safety, reliability, availability, price and patent position.

        Celldex also faces competition from pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies, academic institutions, government agencies and private research organizations in recruiting and retaining highly qualified scientific personnel and consultants and in the development and acquisition of technologies. Moreover, technology controlled by third parties that may be advantageous to Celldex's business may be acquired or licensed by Celldex's competitors, thereby preventing us from obtaining technology on commercially reasonable terms, if at all. Celldex will also compete for the services of third parties that may have already developed or acquired internal biotechnology capabilities or made commercial arrangements with other biopharmaceutical companies to target the diseases on which Celldex has focused both in the U.S. and outside of the U.S.

        Our competitive position will also depend upon our ability to attract and retain qualified personnel, obtain patent protection or otherwise develop proprietary products or processes and secure sufficient capital resources for the often lengthy period between technological conception and

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commercial sales. We will require substantial capital resources to complete development of some or all of our products, obtain the necessary regulatory approvals and successfully manufacture and market our products. In order to secure capital resources, we anticipate having to sell additional capital stock, which would dilute existing stockholders. We may also attempt to obtain funds through research grants and agreements with commercial collaborators. However, these types of fundings are uncertain because they are at the discretion of the organizations and companies that control the funds. As a result, we may not receive any funds from grants or collaborations. Alternatively, we may borrow funds from commercial lenders, likely at high interest rates, which would increase the risk of any investment in Celldex.

J.     Manufacturing

        We have no experience in volume manufacturing and we have relied upon collaborators or contractors to manufacture our proposed products for both clinical and commercial purposes to date. We have established our own manufacturing facility in Fall River, Massachusetts, to produce antibodies, vaccines and other products that we may develop at scale for clinical trials. In order for us to establish a commercial manufacturing facility, we will require substantial additional funds and will be required to hire and retain significant additional personnel and comply with the extensive cGMP regulations of the FDA applicable to such facility. The commercial manufacturing facility would also need to be licensed for the production of antibodies, vaccines and other products by the FDA. We intend to establish manufacturing arrangements with manufacturers that comply with the FDA's requirements and other regulatory standards, although there can be no assurance that we will be able to do so.

        While we believe that there is currently sufficient capacity worldwide for the production of our potential products by our collaborators or through contract manufacturers, establishing long-term relationships with contract manufacturers and securing multiple sources for the necessary quantities of clinical and commercial materials required can be a challenge. Qualifying the initial source of clinical and ultimately commercial material is a time consuming and expensive process due to the highly regulated nature of the pharmaceutical/biotech industry. These costs are hopefully mitigated in the economies of scale realized in commercial manufacture and product sale. The key difficulty in qualifying more than one source for each product is the duplicated time and expense in doing so without the potential to mitigate these costs if the secondary source is never utilized.

        To date, we have been arranging with contract manufacturers for the manufacture of clinical trial supplies of CDX-110, CDX-1307 and CDX-1135. Manufacture of the rotavirus vaccine is the responsibility of Glaxo, which has received from us a world-wide exclusive license to commercialize this vaccine.

        Two clinical lots of CDX-1307 have been manufactured and released for clinical studies by Medarex. This material is being used in Celldex's current Phase 1 clinical trials of CDX-1307. In 2009, Celldex expects to manufacture additional quantities of CDX-1307 in its Fall River facility to meet future clinical material requirements. The Company is currently manufacturing CDX-1401 clinical materials for a Phase 1 clinical trial expected to begin in the second half of 2009.

        We contracted with Lonza Biologics plc for process development and scale-up of CDX-1135 for clinical trials and plan to manufacture CDX-1135 clinical materials in our Fall River facility in 2009. The Walter Reed Army Institute of Research ("WRAIR") has manufactured our bacterial vaccines under collaborative agreements with us. LAHI has manufactured the Megan®Vac 1 and Megan®Egg poultry vaccines.

        The manufacturing processes for our other vaccine and immunotherapeutic delivery systems and vaccines utilize known technologies. We believe that the products we currently have under development can be scaled up to permit manufacture in commercial quantities. However, there can be no assurance that we will not encounter difficulties in scaling up the manufacturing processes.

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        Use of third party manufacturers limits our control over and ability to monitor the manufacturing process. As a result, we may not be able to detect a variety of problems that may arise and may face additional costs in the process of interfacing with and monitoring the progress of our contract manufacturers. If third party manufacturers fail to meet our manufacturing needs in an acceptable manner, we would face delays and additional costs while we develop internal manufacturing capabilities or find alternative third party manufacturers. It may not be possible to have multiple third party manufacturers ready to supply us with needed material at all or without incurring significant costs.

K.    Marketing

        Under the terms of existing and future collaborative agreements, we rely and expect to continue to rely on the efforts of our collaborators for the sale and marketing of our products. We have agreements with, among others, Glaxo, Pfizer, Biolipox (formerly Inflazyme and AdProTech) and VTI for the development and commercialization of some of our products. The relevant aspects of these relationships have been previously discussed under the heading "G. Product Development and Licensing Agreements." There can be no assurance that our collaborators will develop and market vaccine products incorporating our technologies, or, if marketed, that such efforts will be successful. The failure of our collaborators to successfully market products would harm our business.

        We have retained, and in the future intend to retain, marketing rights to some of our product candidates, including vaccine and immunotherapeutic delivery systems and vaccine candidates, in selected geographic areas and for specified indications. We intend to seek marketing and distribution agreements and/or co-promotion agreements for the distribution of our products in these geographic areas and for these indications. We believe that these arrangements could enable us to generate greater financial return than might be obtained from early stage licensing and collaboration agreements. We have no marketing and sales staff and limited experience relating to marketing and distribution of commercial products, including vaccines. If we determine in the future to engage in direct marketing of our products, we will be required to recruit an experienced marketing group, develop a supporting distribution capability and incur significant additional expenditures. There can be no assurance that we will be able to establish a successful marketing force. We may choose or find it necessary to enter into strategic partnerships on uncertain, but potentially unfavorable, terms to sell, market and distribute our products. Any delay in the marketing or distribution of our products, whether it results from problems with internal capabilities or with a collaborative relationship, could harm the value of an investment in Celldex.

L.    Patents, Licenses and Proprietary Rights

        Celldex's policy is to protect our technology by filing patent applications and obtaining patent rights covering our own technology, both in the United States and in foreign countries. In addition, we have acquired and will seek to acquire as needed or desired, exclusive rights of others through assignment or license to complement our portfolio of patent rights. We also rely on trade secrets, unpatented know-how and technological expertise and innovation to develop and maintain our competitive position.

        Patents:    The successful development and marketing of products by Celldex will depend in part on our ability to create and maintain intellectual property, including patent rights. We have established a proprietary patent position in the areas of complement inhibitor technology, cholesterol regulation technology, vaccine technologies, and preservation technologies, and we are the owner or exclusive licensee of numerous patents and pending applications around the world. Although we continue to pursue patent protection for our products, no assurance can be given that any pending application will issue as a patent, that any issued patent will have a scope that will be of commercial benefit, or that we will be able to successfully enforce our patent position against infringers. Celldex routinely reviews its

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patent portfolio and adjusts its strategies for prosecution and maintenance of individual cases according to a number of factors including program priorities, stage of development, and patent term.

        Celldex owns or licenses rights under more than 500 granted patents and national and regional patent applications around the world covering inventions relating to our business. Through Celldex's acquisition of the assets of Alteris Therapeutics, Inc., Celldex has certain exclusive rights under nine issued national or regional patents and three pending national patent applications relating to the technology used in CDX-110. One of the pending patent applications (in Japan) is currently under appeal. Expiration dates for the key issued patents range from 2009 to 2014 in the United States and from 2010 to 2015 in the United Kingdom, Germany and France (not including any possible patent term extensions or Supplementary Protection Certificates, if these are obtained in due course).

        In the area of APC targeting, through Celldex's agreements with Medarex and Rockefeller, Celldex is the owner or exclusive licensee of more than 20 issued patents and more than 70 pending national and regional patent applications worldwide. Through Celldex's agreement with the Ludwig Institute, Celldex has an option to obtain certain commercial rights in connection with Celldex's APC targeting technology under more than 100 national and regional patents and pending patent applications worldwide, relating to NY-ESO-1 and various other tumor antigens. Through Celldex's acquisition of Lorantis Limited (now Celldex Therapeutics Ltd.), Celldex obtained, in the area of Hepatitis B vaccination, certain exclusive rights under seven issued patents and more than 40 pending national and regional patent applications worldwide, and, in the area of Notch signaling modulation, control of 10 issued patents and more than 20 pending national and regional patent applications worldwide. Celldex also has non-exclusive rights under more than 30 national and regional patents and pending patent applications worldwide relating to the adjuvant formulation currently used with CDX-2101. Through Celldex's agreement with 3M, Celldex has certain exclusive rights under more than 100 issued patents and more than 50 pending patent applications relating to 3M's Toll-Like Receptor (TLR 7/8) agonist technology, for use with Celldex's APT targeting technology, as vaccine adjuvants. Through Celldex's agreement with the University of Southampton, Celldex has certain exclusive rights under an international patent application relating to modulation of CD27 activity.

        In the area of complement inhibitor technology, we have rights to 51 patents and patent applications worldwide with the key patents in this area expiring in 2013 and 2016. In the area of cholesterol regulation, we have rights to 35 patents and patent applications worldwide with the key patents in this area expiring in 2016 and 2019. In the area of rotavirus vaccines, we have rights to 20 patents and patent applications worldwide, with the key patents in this area expiring in 2011 and 2012. In the area of cholera and typhoid vaccines, we have rights to 112 patents and patent applications worldwide with the key patents in this area expiring between 2013 and 2016.

        In the area of complement inhibitors, we are co-owner with The Johns Hopkins University and Brigham & Women's Hospital, whose rights Celldex have exclusively licensed, of patents and applications covering inventions relating to soluble complement receptor type I ("sCR1"). These rights are based in part on the work of Dr. Douglas Fearon and include U.S. and foreign patents which claim nucleic acid sequences encoding CR1, sCR1 and active fragments; purification methods; and therapeutic uses of sCR1. We also own a number of other issued patents and patent applications relating to modified sCR1 molecules ("sCR1-sLex") and their uses.

        We also have an exclusive license to 19 issued U.S. and foreign patents directed to a rotavirus strain that has been developed by Glaxo into a commercial rotavirus vaccine.

        We have 26 issued patents and nine additional pending patent applications in the U.S. and selected foreign countries relating to control of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) activity through vaccination.

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        In December 2000, we acquired Megan and by this acquisition obtained exclusive rights to vaccine technology patents and applications based on the work of Dr. Roy Curtiss III. These patent rights complemented and expanded the patent rights acquired by Celldex in an earlier merger with Virus Research Institute, Inc., which had licensed in exclusive patent rights in this technological area from Harvard University and Massachusetts General Hospital, based on the work of Dr. John Mekalanos. In connection with our acquisition of Megan, we entered into a licensing agreement with Pfizer whereby Pfizer has licensed Megan's technology for the development of animal health and food safety vaccines.

        In January 2003, Celldex completed licensing and acquisition agreements which gave us ownership or exclusive rights in certain defined fields to a portfolio of patents and applications filed by Universal Preservation Technologies, Inc. and Elan Drug Delivery Ltd. (now Innovata plc). This portfolio affords Celldex exclusive rights in a particular technology of foam preservation of biomolecules and cells, especially living cells useful as vaccines. This technology should be especially useful in Celldex's vaccine programs to produce vaccine dosage forms that are thermostable.

        There can be no assurance that patent applications owned by or licensed to Celldex will result in granted patents or that, if granted, the resultant patents will afford protection against competitors with similar technology. It is also possible that third parties may obtain patents or other proprietary rights that may be necessary or useful to Celldex. In cases where third parties are first to invent a particular product or technology, it is possible that those parties will obtain patents that will be sufficiently broad to prevent us from using important technology or from further developing or commercializing important vaccine and immunotherapeutic systems and vaccine candidates. If licenses from third parties are necessary but cannot be obtained, commercialization of the covered products might be delayed or prevented. Even if these licenses can be obtained, they would probably require us to pay ongoing royalties and other costs, which could be substantial.

        Although a patent has a statutory presumption of validity in the United States, the issuance of a patent is not conclusive as to validity or as to the enforceable scope of the patent claims. The validity or enforceability of a patent after its issuance by the Patent and Trademark Office can be challenged in litigation. As a business that uses a substantial amount of intellectual property, we face a heightened risk of intellectual property litigation. If the outcome of the litigation is adverse to the owner of the patent, third parties may then be able to use the invention covered by the patent without authorization or payment. There can be no assurance that our issued patents or any patents subsequently issued to or licensed by us will not be successfully challenged in the future. In addition, there can be no assurance that our patents will not be infringed or that the coverage of our patents will not be successfully avoided by competitors through design innovation.

        We are aware that others, including universities and companies, have filed patent applications and have been granted patents in the United States and other countries which claim subject matter potentially useful or necessary to the commercialization of our products. The ultimate scope and validity of existing or future patents which have been or may be granted to third parties, and the availability and cost of acquiring rights in those patents necessary to the manufacture, use or sale of our products presently cannot be determined by Celldex.

        Third parties may have or may obtain valid and enforceable patents or proprietary rights that could block Celldex from developing products using Celldex's technology, including:

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        We use a mutated Vibrio cholerae in our CholeraGarde® vaccine candidate and our VibrioVec® vaccine delivery system. We are aware of an issued U.S. patent which claims a culture of mutated Vibrio cholerae. We believe that only one claim (the "Claim") of the patent may be pertinent to our CholeraGarde® and VibrioVec® products. The remaining claims of the patent cover other cultures, which we believe are not pertinent to the CholeraGarde® or VibrioVec® products. We have received an opinion of counsel from Fish & Richardson, P.C. that, based on the analysis set forth in their opinion and the facts known to them, the Claim is invalid. While a party challenging the validity of a patent has the burden of proving invalidity, the outcome of any litigation cannot be predicted with certainty. Accordingly, there can be no assurance that, if litigated, a court would conclude that the Claim is invalid.

        In addition to the patents referred to in the previous paragraphs, there may be other patent applications and issued patents belonging to competitors that may require us to alter our vaccine candidates and vaccine and immunotherapeutic delivery systems, pay licensing fees or cease some of our activities. If our product candidates conflict with patents that have been or may be granted to competitors, universities or others, the patent owners could bring legal action against us claiming damages and seeking to enjoin manufacturing and marketing of the patented products. If any of these actions is successful, in addition to any potential liability for damages, we could be required to obtain a license in order to continue to manufacture or market the affected products. There can be no assurance that we would prevail in any such action or that any license required under any such third party patent would be made available on acceptable terms or at all. We believe that there may be significant litigation in the biotechnology and vaccine industries regarding patent and other intellectual property rights. If we become involved in that litigation, we could consume substantial resources.

        Licenses:    We have entered into several significant license agreements relating to technology that is being developed by Celldex and/or its collaborators, including licenses from the following: Johns Hopkins University, Duke University and Thomas Jefferson University relating to technology used in or

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with CDX-110; Medarex and GenPharm International relating to APC Targeting Technology and antibody technology; Rockefeller relating to APC Targeting Technology; Ludwig Institute relating to tumor antigens; 3M Company relating to Toll-Like Receptor (TLR) 7/8 agonist technology; Southampton relating to modulation of CD27 activity; Apovia and Celltech R&D relating to Hepatitis B core particle technology; Corixa relating to adjuvant formulations used with Celldex's product candidate CDX-2101; Harvard University and Massachusetts General Hospital relating to proprietary technology involving genetically altered Vibrio cholerea and Salmonella strains; and Cincinnati Children's Hospital involving proprietary rights and technologies relating to an attenuated rotavirus strain for a rotavirus vaccine.

        In general, these institutions have granted us an exclusive worldwide license (with right to sublicense) to make, use and sell products embodying the licensed technology, subject to the reservation by the licensor of a non-exclusive right to use the technologies for non-commercial research purposes. Generally, the term of each license is through the expiration of the last of the patents issued with respect to the technologies covered by the license. We have generally agreed to use reasonable efforts to develop and commercialize licensed products and to achieve specified milestones and pay license fees, milestone payments and royalties based on the net sales of the licensed products or to pay a percentage of sublicense income. If we breach our obligations, the licensor has the right to terminate the license, and, in some cases, convert the license to a non-exclusive license. Generally, we control and are responsible for the cost of defending the patent rights of the technologies that we license.

        Proprietary Rights:    We also rely on unpatented technology, trade secrets and confidential information, and no assurance can be given that others will not independently develop substantially equivalent information and techniques or otherwise gain access to our know-how and information, or that we can meaningfully protect our rights in such unpatented technology, trade secrets and information. We require each of our employees, consultants and advisors to execute a confidentiality agreement at the commencement of an employment or consulting relationship with Celldex. The agreements generally provide that all inventions conceived by the individual in the course of employment or in providing services to Celldex and all confidential information developed by, or made known to, the individual during the term of the relationship shall be the exclusive property of Celldex and shall be kept confidential and not disclosed to third parties except in limited specified circumstances. There can be no assurance, however, that these agreements will provide meaningful protection for our information in the event of unauthorized use or disclosure of such confidential information.

M.   Government Regulation

        Our activities and products are significantly regulated by a number of governmental entities, including the FDA in the United States and by comparable authorities in other countries and by the USDA with respect to products developed for animal health and food safety. These entities regulate, among other things, the manufacture, testing, safety, effectiveness, labeling, documentation, advertising and sale of our products. We must obtain regulatory approval for a product in all of these areas before we can commercialize the product. Product development within this regulatory framework takes a number of years and involves the expenditure of substantial resources. Many products that initially appear promising ultimately do not reach the market because they are found to be unsafe or ineffective when tested. Our inability to commercialize a product would impair our ability to earn future revenues.

        In the United States, vaccines and immunotherapeutics for human use are subject to FDA approval as "biologics" under the Public Health Service Act and "drugs" under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. The steps required before a new product can be commercialized include: pre-clinical studies in animals, clinical trials in humans to determine safety and efficacy and FDA approval of the product for commercial sale.

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        Data obtained at any stage of testing is susceptible to varying interpretations, which could delay, limit or prevent regulatory approval. Moreover, during the regulatory process, new or changed drug approval policies may cause unanticipated delays or rejection of our product. We may not obtain necessary regulatory approvals within a reasonable period of time, if at all, or avoid delays or other problems in testing our products. Moreover, even if we received regulatory approval for a product, the approval may require limitations on use, which could restrict the size of the potential market for the product.

        The FDA provides that human clinical trials may begin thirty (30) days after receipt and review of an Investigational New Drug ("IND") application, unless the FDA requests additional information or changes to the study protocol within that period. An IND must be sponsored and filed by Celldex for each of our proposed products. Authorization to conduct a clinical trial in no way assures that the FDA will ultimately approve the product. Clinical trials are usually conducted in three sequential phases. In a Phase 1 trial, the product is given to a small number of healthy volunteers to test for safety (adverse effects). Phase 2 trials are conducted on a limited group of the target patient population; safety, optimal dosage and efficacy are studied. A Phase 3 trial is performed in a large patient population over a wide geographic area to provide evidence for the safety of the product and to prove and confirm efficacy. The FDA has ongoing oversight over all these trials and can order a temporary or permanent discontinuation if warranted. Such an action could materially harm Celldex. Clinical tests are critical to the success of our products but are subject to unforeseen and uncontrollable delay, including delay in enrollment of patients. Any delay in clinical trials could delay our commercialization of a product.

        A product's safety and effectiveness in one test is not necessarily indicative of its safety and effectiveness in another test. Moreover, we may not discover all potential problems with a product even after completing testing on it. Some of our products and technologies have undergone only pre-clinical testing. As a result, we do not know whether they are safe or effective for humans. Also, regulatory authorities may decide, contrary to our findings, that a product is unsafe or not as effective in actual use as its test results indicated. This could prevent the product's widespread use, require its withdrawal from the market or expose us to liability.

        The results of the clinical trials and all supporting data are submitted to the FDA for approval. A Biologics License Application ("BLA") is submitted for a biologic product; a New Drug Application ("NDA") for a drug product. The interval between IND filing and BLA/NDA filing is usually at least several years due to the length of the clinical trials, and the BLA/NDA review process can take over a year. During this time the FDA may request further testing or additional trials or may turn down the application. Even with approval, the FDA frequently requires post-marketing safety studies (known as Phase 4 trials) to be performed.

        The FDA requires that the manufacturing facility that produces a licensed product meet specified standards, undergo an inspection and obtain an establishment license prior to commercial marketing. Subsequent discovery of previously unknown problems with a product or its manufacturing process may result in restrictions on the product or the manufacturer, including withdrawal of the product from the market. Failure to comply with the applicable regulatory requirements can result in fines, suspensions of regulatory approvals, product recalls, operating restrictions and criminal prosecution.

        In the United States, vaccines for animal health and food safety use are subject to USDA approval. The steps required before a new product can be commercialized include: pre-clinical studies in animals; clinical trials in animals to determine safety and efficacy; and USDA approval of the product for commercial sale. The registration of these vaccines may be subject to numerous delays or possibly outright rejection of the product by the agency. Delays may occur at any stage of testing, clinical results may be subject to unfavorable interpretation by the agency and regulatory approval, if received, may require limitations on use which could restrict the size of the potential market for the product. The USDA requires that the manufacturing facility that produces a licensed product meet

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specified standards, undergo an inspection and obtain an establishment license prior to commercial marketing. Under USDA regulations, this license is held by the manufacturer of the product, not the developer of the product. Failure to comply with applicable USDA regulatory requirements can result in fines, suspensions of regulatory approvals, product recalls, operating restrictions and criminal prosecution.

        The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices ("ACIP") of the Centers for Disease Control ("CDC") has a role in setting the public market in the United States for the vaccine products we intend to develop. The ACIP makes recommendations on the appropriate use of vaccines and related products and the CDC develops epidemiologic data relevant to vaccine requirements and usage.

        Because we may market our products abroad, we will be subject to varying foreign regulatory requirements. Although international efforts are being made to harmonize these requirements, applications must currently be made in each country. The data necessary and the review time vary significantly from one country to another. Approval by the FDA does not ensure approval by the regulatory bodies of other countries.

        Our collaborators are also subject to all of the above-described regulations in connection with the commercialization of products utilizing our technology.

N.    Product Liability

        The risk of product liability claims, product recalls and associated adverse publicity is inherent in the testing, manufacturing, marketing and sale of medical products. If and when we manufacture vaccines that are recommended for routine administration to children, we will be required to participate in the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program. This program compensates children having adverse reactions to certain routine childhood immunizations with funds collected through an excise tax from the manufacturers of these vaccines.

        We have clinical trial liability insurance coverage in the amount of $5 million. However, there can be no assurance that such insurance coverage is or will continue to be adequate or available. We may choose or find it necessary under our collaborative agreements to increase our insurance coverage in the future. We may not be able to secure greater or broader product liability insurance coverage on acceptable terms or at reasonable costs when needed. Any liability for mandatory damages could exceed the amount of our coverage. A successful product liability claim against us could require us to pay a substantial monetary award. Moreover, a product recall could generate substantial negative publicity about our products and business and inhibit or prevent commercialization of other product candidates.

O.    Employees; Scientific Consultants

        As of February 20, 2009, we employed 78 full time persons and 3 part time or temporary persons, 11 of whom have doctoral degrees. Of these employees, 63 were engaged in or directly support research and development activities. Celldex's success depends in large part upon its ability to attract and retain employees. Celldex faces competition for employees from other companies, research and academic institutions, government agencies and other organizations. Celldex believes that its employee relations are good.

Item 1A.    Risk Factors

        You should consider carefully these risk factors together with all of the information included or incorporated by reference in this Annual Report in addition to our financial statements and the notes to our financial statements. This section includes forward-looking statements.

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        The following is a discussion of the risk factors that we believe are material to Celldex at this time. These risks and uncertainties are not the only ones facing Celldex and there may be additional matters that we are unaware of or that we currently consider immaterial. All of these could adversely affect our business, results of operations, financial condition and cash flows.

Risks Related to Our Business

Our products and product candidates are subject to extensive regulatory scrutiny.

        All of our products and product candidates are at various stages of development and commercialization and our activities, products and product candidates are significantly regulated by a number of governmental entities, including the FDA in the United States and by comparable authorities in other countries and by the USDA in the United States with respect to products developed for animal health and food safety. These entities regulate, among other things, the manufacture, testing, safety, effectiveness, labeling, documentation, advertising and sale of our products and product candidates. We or our partners must obtain regulatory approval for a product candidate in all of these areas before we can commercialize the product candidate. Product development within this regulatory framework takes a number of years and involves the expenditure of substantial resources. This process typically requires extensive pre-clinical and clinical testing, which may take longer or cost more than we anticipate, and may prove unsuccessful due to numerous factors. Many product candidates that initially appear promising ultimately do not reach the market because they are found to be unsafe or ineffective when tested. Companies in the pharmaceutical, biotechnology and vaccines industries have suffered significant setbacks in advanced clinical trials, even after obtaining promising results in earlier trials. Our inability to commercialize a product or product candidate would impair our ability to earn future revenues.

If our products do not pass required tests for safety and effectiveness, we will not be able to derive commercial revenue from them.

        For Celldex to succeed, we will need to derive commercial revenue from the products we have under development. The FDA has not approved our CDX-110 product candidate or any of our lead products for sale to date. Products in our vaccine programs are in various stages of pre-clinical and clinical testing. Pre-clinical tests are performed at an early stage of a product's development and provide information about a product's safety and effectiveness on laboratory animals. Pre-clinical tests can last years. If a product passes its pre-clinical tests satisfactorily, and we determine that further development is warranted, we file an investigational new drug application for the product with the FDA, and if the FDA gives its approval we begin phase 1 clinical tests. Phase 1 testing generally lasts between 6 and 24 months. If phase 1 test results are satisfactory and the FDA gives its approval, we can begin phase 2 clinical tests. Phase 2 testing generally lasts between 6 and 36 months. If phase 2 test results are satisfactory and the FDA gives its approval, we can begin phase 3 pivotal studies. Phase 3 studies generally last between 12 and 48 months. Once clinical testing is completed and a new drug application is filed with the FDA, it may take more than a year to receive FDA approval.

        In all cases we must show that a pharmaceutical product is both safe and effective before the FDA, or drug approval agencies of other countries where we intend to sell the product, will approve it for sale. Our research and testing programs must comply with drug approval requirements both in the United States and in other countries, since we are developing our lead products with companies, including Glaxo and Pfizer, which intend to or could later decide to commercialize them both in the U.S. and abroad. A product may fail for safety or effectiveness at any stage of the testing process. A major risk we face is the possibility that none of our products under development will come through the testing process to final approval for sale, with the result that we cannot derive any commercial revenue from them after investing significant amounts of capital in multiple stages of pre-clinical and clinical testing.

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Product testing is critical to the success of our products but subject to delay or cancellation if we have difficulty enrolling patients.

        As our portfolio of potential products moves from pre-clinical testing to clinical testing, and then through progressively larger and more complex clinical trials, we will need to enroll an increasing number of patients with the appropriate characteristics. At times we have experienced difficulty enrolling patients and we may experience more difficulty as the scale of our clinical testing program increases. The factors that affect our ability to enroll patients are largely uncontrollable and include principally the following:

        If we cannot enroll patients as needed, our costs may increase or it could force us to delay or terminate testing for a product.

Any delay in obtaining regulatory approval would have an adverse impact on our ability to earn future revenues.

        It is possible that none of the products or product candidates that we develop will obtain the regulatory approvals necessary for us to begin commercializing them. The time required to obtain FDA and other approvals is unpredictable but often can take years following the commencement of clinical trials, depending upon the nature of the product candidate. Any analysis we perform of data from clinical activities is subject to confirmation and interpretation by regulatory authorities, which could delay, limit or prevent regulatory approval. Any delay or failure in obtaining required approvals could have a material adverse effect on our ability to generate revenues from the particular product candidate. Furthermore, if we, or our partners, do not reach the market with our products before our competitors offer products for the same or similar uses, or if we, or our partners, are not effective in marketing our products, our revenues from product sales, if any, will be reduced.

        We face intense competition in our development activities. We face competition from many companies in the United States and abroad, including a number of large pharmaceutical companies, firms specialized in the development and production of vaccines, adjuvants and vaccine and immunotherapeutic delivery systems and major universities and research institutions. These competitors include Anitgenics, Baxter, Crucell, Dendreon, Emergent, GlaxoSmithKline, Intercell, Sanofi-Aventis, Maxygen, Merck, NeoPharm, Novavax, Pfizer, Roche, Genitope, Northwest Biotherapeutics, Vical and Cell Genesys. Most of our competitors have substantially greater resources, more extensive experience in conducting pre-clinical studies and clinical testing and obtaining regulatory approvals for their products, greater operating experience, greater research and development and marketing capabilities and greater production capabilities than those of Celldex. These companies might succeed in obtaining regulatory approval for competitive products more rapidly than we can for our products, especially if we experience any delay in obtaining required regulatory approvals.

Failure to comply with applicable regulatory requirements would adversely impact our operations.

        Even after receiving regulatory approval, our products would eb subject to extensive regulatory requirements, and our failure to comply with applicable regulatory requirements will adversely impact our operations. In the United States, the FDA and USDA, as applicable, require that the

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manufacturing facility that produces a product meet specified standards, undergo an inspection and obtain an establishment license prior to commercial marketing. Under USDA regulations, this license is held by the manufacturer of the product and not the developer of the product. Subsequent discovery of previously unknown problems with a product or its manufacturing process may result in restrictions on the product or the manufacturer, including withdrawal of the product from the market. Failure to comply with the applicable regulatory requirements can result in fines, suspensions of regulatory approvals, product recalls, operating restrictions and criminal prosecution.

We depend greatly on the intellectual capabilities and experience of our key executives and scientists and the loss of any of them could affect our ability to develop our products.

        The loss of Anthony S. Marucci, our President and Chief Executive Officer, or other key members of our staff, including Avery W. Catlin, our Chief Financial Officer, Dr. Thomas Davis, our Chief Medical officer, or Dr. Tibor Keler, our Chief Scientific Officer, could harm us. We entered into employment agreements with Messrs. Marucci, Catlin, Davis and Keler. We also depend on our scientific and clinical collaborators and advisors, all of whom have outside commitments that may limit their availability to us. In addition, we believe that our future success will depend in large part upon our ability to attract and retain highly skilled scientific, managerial and marketing personnel, particularly as we expand our activities in clinical trials, the regulatory approval process and sales and manufacturing. We routinely enter into consulting agreements with our scientific and clinical collaborators and advisors, opinion leaders and heads of academic departments in the ordinary course of our business. We also enter into contractual agreements with physicians and institutions who recruit patients into our clinical trials on our behalf in the ordinary course of our business. Notwithstanding these arrangements, we face significant competition for this type of personnel from other companies, research and academic institutions, government entities and other organizations. We cannot predict our success in hiring or retaining the personnel we require for continued growth.

We rely on contract manufacturers. Should the cost, delivery and quality of clinical and commercial grade materials supplied by contract manufacturers vary to our disadvantage, our business operations could suffer significant harm.

        Although we have small-lot manufacturing capability at our Fall River facility, we have in the past relied on, and expect to continue to rely on sourcing from third-party manufacturers for suitable quantities of some of our clinical and commercial grade materials essential to pre-clinical and clinical studies currently underway and to planned clinical trials in addition to those currently being conducted by third parties or us. The inability to have suitable quality and quantities of these essential materials produced in a timely manner would result in significant delays in the clinical development and commercialization of products, which could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations. We may rely on collaborators and contract manufacturers to manufacture proposed products in both clinical and commercial quantities in the future. Our leading vaccine candidates require specialized manufacturing capabilities and processes.

        We have faced difficulties in securing commitments from U.S. and foreign contract manufacturers as these manufacturers have at times been unwilling or unable to accommodate our needs. Relying on foreign manufacturers involves peculiar and increased risks, and on one occasion we had to terminate a contract with a foreign manufacturer and find a substitute source of material for planned clinical trials. These peculiar and increased risks include risks relating to the difficulties foreign manufacturers may face in complying with the FDA's Good Manufacturing Practices, or GMP, as a result of language barriers, lack of familiarity with GMP or the FDA regulatory process or other causes, economic or political instability in or affecting the home countries of our foreign manufacturers, shipping delays, potential changes in foreign regulatory laws governing the sales of our product supplies, fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates and the imposition or application of trade restrictions.

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        There can be no assurances that we will be able to enter into long-term arrangements with third party manufacturers on acceptable terms or at all. Further, contract manufacturers must also be able to meet our timetable and requirements, and must operate in compliance with GMP; failure to do so could result in, among other things, the disruption of product supplies. As noted above, non-U.S. contract manufacturers may face special challenges in complying with the FDA's GMP requirements, and although we are not currently dependent on non-U.S. collaborators or contract manufacturers, we may choose or be required to rely on non-U.S. sources in the future as we seek to develop stable supplies of increasing quantities of materials for ongoing clinical trials of larger scale. Our dependence upon third parties for the manufacture of our products may adversely affect our profit margins and our ability to develop and deliver products on a timely and competitive basis.

        Prior to the establishment in 2008 of our own in-house antibody manufacturing capabilities at our Fall River facility, we had depended on third party suppliers and manufacturers, including Medarex, Biosyn Corporation, American Peptide Company, AmbioPharm, Inc., WRAIR, Lonza Biologics plc, Bioconcept, Inc., NeoMPS, Inc. and LAHI, to provide us with suitable quantities of materials necessary for clinical tests. If these materials are not available in suitable quantities of appropriate quality, in a timely manner, and at a feasible cost, our clinical tests will face delays.

We rely on third parties to plan, conduct and monitor our clinical tests, and their failure to perform as required would interfere with our product development.

        We have relied on third parties, including, among others, Omnicare, Inc., Accelovance, the International Center for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh, the International Vaccines Institute, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, The Cleveland Clinic, Radiant Research, Inc., Biobridges, LLC, Glaser Research Group, the NIH, Pfizer, Inc. and Glaxo to conduct the significant majority of our clinical research development activities. These activities can be characterized as clinical patient recruitment and observation, clinical trial monitoring, clinical data management and analysis, safety monitoring and project management. We conduct approximately 75% of our project management and 50% of our medical and safety monitoring in-house and rely on third parties for the remainder of our clinical development activities. If any of these third parties fails to perform as we expect or if their work fails to meet regulatory standards, our testing could be delayed, cancelled or rendered ineffective.

We depend greatly on third party collaborators to license, develop and commercialize some of our products, and they may not meet our expectations.

        We have agreements with other companies, including Glaxo, Pfizer, Biolipox and VTI for the licensing, development and ultimate commercialization of some of our products. Some of those agreements give substantial responsibility over the products to the collaborator. Some collaborators may be unable or unwilling to devote sufficient resources to develop our products as their agreements require. They often face business risks similar to ours, and this could interfere with their efforts. Also, collaborators may choose to devote their resources to products that compete with ours. If a collaborator does not successfully develop any one of our products, we will need to find another collaborator to do so. The success of our search for a new collaborator will depend on our legal right to do so at the time and whether the product remains commercially viable.

        The success of our vaccine candidates depends in great part upon our and our collaborators' success in promoting them as superior to other treatment alternatives. We believe that vaccines like those under development by Celldex can be proven to offer disease prevention and treatment with notable advantages over drugs in terms of patient compliance and effectiveness. However, there can be no assurance that we will be able to prove these advantages or that the advantages will be sufficient to support the successful commercialization of our vaccines.

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We may face delays, difficulties or unanticipated costs in establishing sales, distribution and manufacturing capabilities for our commercially ready products.

        To date, we have chosen to retain, rather than license, all rights to some of our lead products, such as our APC Targeting Technology programs. If we proceed with this strategy, we will have full responsibility for commercialization of these products if and when they are approved for sale. We currently lack the marketing, sales and distribution capabilities that we will need to carry out this strategy. To market any of our products directly, we must develop a substantial marketing and sales force with technical expertise and a supporting distribution capability. We have little expertise in this area, and we may not succeed. We may find it necessary to enter into strategic partnerships on uncertain but potentially unfavorable terms to sell, market and distribute our products when they are approved for sale.

        Some of our products are difficult to manufacture, especially in large quantities, and we have not yet developed commercial scale manufacturing processes for any of our products. We do not currently plan to develop internal manufacturing capabilities to produce any of our products at commercial scale if they are approved for sale. To the extent that we choose to market and distribute these products ourselves, this strategy will make us dependent on other companies to produce our products in adequate quantities, in compliance with regulatory requirements, and at a competitive cost. We may not find third parties capable of meeting those manufacturing needs.

Certain factors could negatively affect the demand for and sales and profitability of Rotarix®, which would have a material adverse affect on our revenues.

        Both the demand and ultimately the profitability of Rotarix® are components to our success. We have licensed a rotavirus strain to Glaxo for the purposes of Glaxo developing and commercializing their Rotarix® vaccine worldwide. Glaxo gained approval for Rotarix® in Mexico in July 2004, in the European Union in February 2006 and in the United States in April 2008. In May 2005, Celldex entered into an agreement whereby an affiliate of PRF purchased an interest in the net royalties we will receive on worldwide sales of Rotarix® (see Note 10 of our audited consolidated financial statements) and we retained 50% of Glaxo milestone payments, with the balance payable to PRF and CCH. In addition, Celldex retains substantial upside participation in the worldwide net royalty stream from Rotarix® if worldwide net royalties once PRF receives an agreed upon return on capital invested (2.45 times PRF's aggregate cash payments to Celldex of $60 million). The following are potential factors, among others, that may negatively affect the demand for Rotarix®:

        Any of these factors could have a material adverse effect on the sales of Rotarix® and our results of operations.

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Other factors could affect the demand for and sales and profitability of Rotarix® and any other of our current or future products.

        In general, other factors that could affect the demand for and sales and profitability of our products include, but are not limited to:

        Any of these factors could have a material adverse effect on Glaxo's sales of Rotarix® and on any other of our current or future products and results of operations.

We may be unable to manage multiple late stage clinical trials for a variety of product candidates simultaneously.

        As our current clinical trials progress, we may need to manage multiple late stage clinical trials simultaneously in order to continue developing all of our current products. The management of late stage clinical trials is more complex and time consuming than early stage trials. Typically early stage trials involve several hundred patients in no more than 10-20 clinical sites. Late stage (Phase 3) trials may involve up to several thousand patients in up to several hundred clinical sites and may require facilities in several countries. Therefore, the project management required to supervise and control such an extensive program is substantially larger than early stage programs. As the need for these resources is not known until some months before the trials begin it is necessary to recruit large numbers of experienced and talented individuals very quickly. If the labor market does not allow this team to be recruited quickly the sponsor is faced with a decision to delay the program or to initiate it with inadequate management resources. This may result in recruitment of inappropriate patients, inadequate monitoring of clinical investigators and inappropriate handling of data or data analysis. Consequently it is possible that conclusions of efficacy or safety may not be acceptable to permit filing of a BLA or NDA for any one of the above reasons or a combination of several.

We face the risk of product liability claims, which could exceed our insurance coverage, and produce recalls, each of which could deplete our cash resources.

        As a participant in the pharmaceutical, biotechnology and vaccines industries, we are exposed to the risk of product liability claims alleging that use of our products or product candidates caused an

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injury or harm. These claims can arise at any point in the development, testing, manufacture, marketing or sale of our products or product candidates and may be made directly by patients involved in clinical trials of our products, by consumers or healthcare providers or by individuals, organizations or companies selling our products. Product liability claims can be expensive to defend, even if the product or product candidate did not actually cause the alleged injury or harm.

        Insurance covering product liability claims becomes increasingly expensive as a product candidate moves through the development pipeline to commercialization. We have clinical trial liability insurance coverage in the amount of $5 million. However, there can be no assurance that such insurance coverage is or will continue to be adequate or available to us at a cost acceptable to us or at all. We may choose or find it necessary under our collaborative agreements to increase our insurance coverage in the future. We may not be able to secure greater or broader product liability insurance coverage on acceptable terms or at reasonable costs when needed. Any liability for damages resulting from a product liability claim could exceed the amount of our coverage, require us to pay a substantial monetary award from our own cash resources and have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. Moreover, a product recall, if required, could generate substantial negative publicity about our products and business and inhibit or prevent commercialization of other products and product candidates.

        In addition, some of our licensing and other agreements with third parties require or might require us to maintain product liability insurance. If we cannot maintain acceptable amounts of coverage on commercially reasonable terms in accordance with the terms set forth in these agreements, the corresponding agreements would be subject to termination, which could have a material adverse impact on our operations.

Our reliance on third parties requires us to share our trade secrets, which increases the possibility that a competitor will discover them.

        Because we rely on third parties to develop our products, we must share trade secrets with them. We seek to protect our proprietary technology in part by entering into confidentiality agreements and, if applicable, material transfer agreements, collaborative research agreements, consulting agreements or other similar agreements with our collaborators, advisors, employees and consultants prior to beginning research or disclosing proprietary information. These agreements will typically restrict the ability of our collaborators, advisors, employees and consultants to publish data potentially relating to our trade secrets. Our academic collaborators typically have rights to publish data, provided that we are notified in advance and may delay publication for a specified time in order to secure our intellectual property rights arising from the collaboration. In other cases, publication rights are typically controlled exclusively by us, although in some cases we may share these rights with other parties. We also conduct joint research and development programs which may require us to share trade secrets under the terms of research and development partnership or similar agreements. Despite our efforts to protect our trade secrets, our competitors may discover our trade secrets, either through breach of these agreements, independent development or publication of information including our trade secrets in cases where we do not have proprietary or otherwise protected rights at the time of publication. A competitor's discovery of our trade secrets would impair our competitive position.

We may not be able to successfully integrate newly-acquired technology with our existing technology or to modify our technologies to create new vaccines.

        As part of our acquisition of technology assets from entities such as 3M Company, we have acquired access to Resiquimod™ (a TLR 7/8 agonists) which may improve the immunogenicity of our vaccines. If we are able to integrate these licensed assets with our vaccine technologies, we believe these assets will give Celldex's vaccines a competitive advantage. However, if we are unable to successfully integrate licensed assets, or other technologies which we have acquired or may acquire in

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the future, with our existing technologies and potential products currently under development, we may be unable to realize any benefit from our acquisition of these assets, or other technologies which we have acquired or may acquire in the future and may face the loss of our investment of financial resources and time in the integration process.

        We believe that Celldex's vaccine technology portfolio may offer opportunities to develop vaccines that treat a variety of oncology, inflammatory and infectious diseases by stimulating a patient's immune system against those disease organisms. If our vaccine technology portfolio cannot be used to create effective vaccines against a variety of disease organisms, we may lose all or portions of our investment in development efforts for new vaccine candidates.

We license technology from other companies to develop products, and those companies could influence research and development or restrict our use of it.

        Companies that license technologies to us that we use in our research and development programs may require us to achieve milestones or devote minimum amounts of resources to develop products using those technologies. They may also require us to make significant royalty and milestone payments, including a percentage of any sublicensing income, as well as payments to reimburse them for patent costs. The number and variety of our research and development programs require us to establish priorities and to allocate available resources among competing programs. From time to time we may choose to slow down or cease our efforts on particular products. If in doing so we fail to fully perform our obligations under a license, the licensor can terminate the licenses or permit our competitors to use the technology. Moreover, we may lose our right to market and sell any products based on the licensed technology.

We have many competitors in our field and they may develop technologies that make ours obsolete.

        Biotechnology, pharmaceuticals and therapeutics are rapidly evolving fields in which scientific and technological developments are expected to continue at a rapid pace. We have many competitors in the U.S. and abroad, including Alexion, Antigenics, Baxter, Crucell, Dendreon, Emergent BioSolutions, GlaxoSmithKline, Intercell, Sanofi-Aventis, Maxygen, Merck, NeoPharm, Novavax, Pfizer, Roche, Genitope, Northwest Biotherapeutics, Vical, Anadys, Idera, and Cell Genesys. Our success depends upon our ability to develop and maintain a competitive position in the product categories and technologies on which we focus. Many of our competitors have greater capabilities, experience and financial resources than we do. Competition is intense and is expected to increase as new products enter the market and new technologies become available. Our competitors may:

We rely on patents, patent applications and other intellectual property protections to protect our technology and trade secrets; which are expensive and may not provide sufficient protection.

        Our success depends in part on our ability to obtain and maintain patent protection for technologies that we use. Biotechnology patents involve complex legal, scientific and factual questions and are highly uncertain. To date, there is no consistent policy regarding the breadth of claims allowed in biotechnology patents, particularly in regard to patents for technologies for human uses like those we use in our business. We cannot predict whether the patents we seek will issue. If they do issue, a competitor may challenge them and limit their scope. Moreover, our patents may not afford effective

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protection against competitors with similar technology. A successful challenge to any one of our patents could result in a third party's ability to use the technology covered by the patent. We also face the risk that others will infringe, avoid or circumvent our patents. Technology that we license from others is subject to similar risks and this could harm our ability to use that technology. If we, or a company that licenses technology to us, were not the first creator of an invention that we use, our use of the underlying product or technology will face restrictions, including elimination.

        If we must defend against suits brought against us or prosecute suits against others involving intellectual property rights, we will incur substantial costs. In addition to any potential liability for significant monetary damages, a decision against us may require us to obtain licenses to patents or other intellectual property rights of others on potentially unfavorable terms. If those licenses from third parties are necessary but we cannot acquire them, we would attempt to design around the relevant technology, which would cause higher development costs and delays, and may ultimately prove impracticable.

Our business requires us to use hazardous materials, which increases our exposure to dangerous and costly accidents.

        Our research and development activities involve the use of hazardous chemicals, biological materials and radioactive compounds. Although we believe that our safety procedures for handling and disposing of hazardous materials comply with the standards prescribed by applicable laws and regulations, we cannot completely eliminate the risk of accidental contamination or injury from these materials. In the event of an accident, an injured party will likely sue us for any resulting damages with potentially significant liability. The ongoing cost of complying with environmental laws and regulations is significant and may increase in the future.

Health care reform and restrictions on reimbursement may limit our returns on potential products.

        Because Celldex's strategy ultimately depends on the commercial success of our products, we assume, among other things, that end users of our products will be able to pay for them. In the United States and other countries, in most cases, the volume of sales of products like those we are developing depends on the availability of reimbursement from third-party payors, including national health care agencies, private health insurance plans and health maintenance organizations. Third-party payors increasingly challenge the prices charged for medical products and services. Accordingly, if we succeed in bringing products to market, and reimbursement is not available or is insufficient, we could be prevented from successfully commercializing our potential products.

        The health care industry in the United States and in Europe is undergoing fundamental changes as a result of political, economic and regulatory influences. Reforms proposed from time to time include mandated basic health care benefits, controls on health care spending, the establishment of governmental controls over the cost of therapies, creation of large medical services and products purchasing groups and fundamental changes to the health care delivery system. We anticipate ongoing review and assessment of health care delivery systems and methods of payment in the United States and other countries. We cannot predict whether any particular reform initiatives will result or, if adopted, what their impact on us will be. However, we expect that adoption of any reform proposed will impair our ability to market products at acceptable prices.

Risks Related to Our Capital Stock

Our history of losses and uncertainty of future profitability make our common stock a highly speculative investment.

        We have had no commercial revenues to date from sales of our human therapeutic or vaccine products and cannot predict when we will. We have accumulated net operating losses of approximately

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$121.1 million as of December 31, 2008. We expect to spend substantial funds to continue research and product testing of the following products we have in the pre-clinical and clinical testing stages of development:

Product
  Use   Stage

CDX-110

  Glioblastoma multiforme   Clinical phase 2

CDX-1307

  Colorectal, bladder, pancreas, ovarian and breast tumors   Clinical phase 1

CDX-1401

  Multiple solid tumors   Pre-clinical

CDX-1127

  Immuno-modulation, multiple tumors   Pre-clinical

CDX-1135 (formerly TP10)

  Transplantation
Renal disease
  Clinical phase 1/2
Pre-clinical

CDX-1189

  Renal disease   Pre-clinical

Ty800 vaccine

  Typhoid fever   Clinical phase 2

CDX-2401

  HIV infection   Pre-clinical

        In anticipation of FDA approval of these products, we will need to make substantial investments to establish sales, marketing, quality control, and regulatory compliance capabilities. These investments will increase if and when any of these products receive FDA approval. We cannot predict how quickly our lead products will progress through the regulatory approval process. As a result, we may continue to lose money for several years.

        We cannot be certain that the company will achieve or sustain profitability in the future. Failure to achieve profitability could diminish our ability to sustain operations, pay dividends on our common stock, obtain additional required funds and make required payments on our present or future indebtedness.

If we cannot sell capital stock to raise necessary funds, we may be forced to limit our research, development and testing programs.

        We will need to raise more capital from investors to advance our lead products through clinical testing and to fund our operations until we receive final FDA approval and our products begin to generate revenues for us. However, based on our history of losses and the on-going uncertainty of the U.S. capital markets, we may have difficulty raising sufficient capital on terms that are acceptable to us, or at all. As of December 31, 2008, we had cash and cash equivalents of $44.3 million, which, at that time, we believed would support expected operations for more than 12 months.

        We continue to seek partnerships with pharmaceutical and biotech companies and with other organizations to support the clinical development of our programs, in addition to funded research grants. This kind of funding is at the discretion of other organizations and companies which have limited funds and many companies compete with us for those funds. As a result, we may not receive any research grants or funds from collaborators. If we are unable to raise the necessary funds, we may have to delay or discontinue the clinical development of programs, license out programs earlier than expected, raise funds at significant discount or on other unfavorable terms, if at all, or evaluate a sale of all or part of our business.

        Until the Company begins generating revenue, it may seek funding through the sale of equity, or securities convertible into equity, and further dilution to the then existing stockholders may result. If the Company raises additional capital through the incurrence of debt, its business may be affected by the amount of leverage it incurs, and its borrowings may subject it to restrictive covenants.

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Our share price has been and could remain volatile.

        The market price of our common stock has historically experienced and may continue to experience significant volatility. From January 2008 through December 2008, the market price of our common stock has fluctuated from a high of $19.79 per share in the second quarter of 2008, to a low of $4.24 per share in the fourth quarter of 2008. Our progress in developing and commercializing our products, the impact of government regulations on our products and industry, the potential sale of a large volume of our common stock by selling stockholders, our quarterly operating results, changes in general conditions in the economy or the financial markets and other developments affecting us or our competitors could cause the market price of our common stock to fluctuate substantially with substantial market losses occurring over the past year. In addition, in recent years, the stock market has experienced significant price and volume fluctuations. This volatility has affected the market prices of securities issued by many companies for reasons unrelated to their operating performance and may adversely affect the price of our common stock. In addition, we could be subject to a securities class action litigation as a result of volatility in the price of our stock, which could result in substantial costs and diversion of management's attention and resources and could harm our stock price, business, prospects, results of operations and financial condition.

If our principal stockholders sell shares of common stock in large volumes, the trading price of our common stock could suffer.

        If our principal stockholders sell a substantial number of shares of common stock, especially if those sales are made during a short period of time, those sales could adversely affect the market price of our common stock and could impair our ability to raise capital. As of February 20, 2009, Medarex, Inc. owned approximately 31.4% of our outstanding common stock, Apax WW Nominees Ltd. owned approximately 8.8%, and Pfizer Vaccines owned approximately 4.9%. Our officers and directors, and their affiliates, beneficially owned approximately 6.86% of our common stock as of February 20, 2009. Of our largest stockholders, only Medarex is subject to a "lock-up" agreement pursuant to which it has agreed not to sell shares of common stock, which, unless extended, expires on March 7, 2009. There can be no assurances that the Medarex lock-up will be extended.

Our principal stockholders, officers and directors own a large percentage of our voting stock and could exert significant influence over matters requiring stockholder approval.

        As of February 20, 2009, Medarex, Inc., Apax WW Nominees Ltd., Pfizer Vaccines and our officers and directors, together beneficially owned approximately 52% of our common stock. Accordingly, these stockholders will be able to exert significant influence over matters requiring approval by our stockholders, including the election of directors and the approval of mergers or other business combinations. This concentration could have the effect of delaying or preventing a change in control of the company.

The combined company's ability to use the net operating loss carryforwards of the Company and its subsidiaries will be subject to limitation and, under certain circumstances, may be eliminated.

        Generally, a change of more than 50% in the ownership of a corporation's stock, by value, over a three-year period constitutes an ownership change under Section 382 of the Internal Revenue Code. In general, Section 382 imposes an annual limitation on a corporation's ability to use its net operating losses from taxable years or periods ending on or before the date of an ownership change to offset U.S. federal taxable income in any post-change year. The Company and its subsidiaries have experienced an ownership change as a result of the Merger, in which case the combined company may be subject to the limitation under Section 382 with respect to pre-change net operating losses of the Company and its subsidiaries. Section 382 imposes significant limitations of the use of net operating loss carryforwards.

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        Moreover, if a corporation experiences an ownership change and does not satisfy the requirement to continue the business enterprise of the corporation under Section 382(c)(1) (which generally requires that the corporation continue its historic business or use a significant portion of its historic business assets in a business for the two-year period beginning on the date of the ownership change), it cannot, subject to certain exceptions, use any net operating loss from a pre-change period to offset taxable income in post-change years. As a result of the rules described above, the extent (if any) to which the combined company will be able to utilize the net operating losses from any pre-change period to offset taxable income (and thus reduce tax liability) for post-change periods is uncertain.

Item 1B.    UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

        None.

Item 2.    PROPERTIES

        In November 2005, we entered into a lease amendment which extended our lease in Needham, Massachusetts through April, 2017. The lease amendment called for the complete renovation of the Needham facility by the landlord and Celldex, which was completed in 2007, and reduced our leased space to approximately 35,200 square feet of laboratory and office space. Under this lease amendment, we are obligated to pay an escalating base annual rent ranging from $879,700 to $1,161,200 during the extension term. Aggregate rental payments including common area maintenance costs for the years ended December 31, 2008 and 2007 for this facility were $1,437,040 and $1,911,088, respectively.

        Celldex leases approximately 20,000 square feet of office and laboratory space in Phillipsburg, New Jersey. The lease has an initial sixty-four month term which expires in August 2011. Under the lease agreement, we are obligated to pay an annual rent of approximately $347,700 plus certain common area maintenance costs. The landlord provided a tenant incentive allowance of approximately $178,600 against the cost of alterations and improvements required by Celldex. Aggregate rental payments including common area maintenance costs for the years ended December 31, 2008 and 2007 for this facility were $370,652 and $347,652, respectively.

        We also lease a manufacturing facility of approximately 21,000 square feet in Fall River, Massachusetts. The lease has an initial seven-year term which expires in December 2010. Under the lease agreement and subsequent lease amendments, we are obligated to pay an annual rent of approximately $305,500 plus certain common area maintenance costs, subject to annual rent adjustments in the final two years. Aggregate rental payments including common area maintenance costs for the years ended December 31, 2008 and 2007 for this facility were $390,664 and $366,654, respectively.

        The Company ceased operations at its Overland, Missouri facility near St. Louis and vacated the premises upon expiration of the lease term at September 30, 2007.

Item 3.    LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

        Celldex is not currently a party to any material legal proceedings.

Item 4.    SUBMISSION OF MATTERS TO A VOTE OF SECURITY HOLDERS

        None.

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PART II

Item 5.    MARKET FOR REGISTRANT'S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

        Effective October 1, 2008, the Company changed its name from AVANT Immunotherapeutics, Inc. to Celldex Therapeutics, Inc. and our common stock began trading on the NASDAQ Global Market (the "NASDAQ") under the symbol "CLDX". Prior to that date and after August 24, 1998, we were traded on NASDAQ under the symbol "AVAN". Prior to the August 24, 1998 date, we were traded on NASDAQ under the symbol "TCEL". The following table sets forth for the periods indicated the high and low closing sales prices for our common stock as reported by NASDAQ. The numbers below reflect the 1-for-12 reverse stock split effected on March 7, 2008.

Fiscal Period
  High   Low  

Year Ended December 31, 2007

             
 

1Q (Jan. 1 - March 31, 2007)

  $ 18.60   $ 15.36  
 

2Q (April 1 - June 30, 2007)

    17.76     8.88  
 

3Q (July 1 - Sept. 30, 2007)

    11.16     4.80  
 

4Q (Oct. 1 - Dec. 31, 2007)

    9.48     4.80  

Year Ended December 31, 2008

             
 

1Q (Jan. 1 - March 31, 2008)

  $ 9.91   $ 5.64  
 

2Q (April 1 - June 30, 2008)

    19.79     9.55  
 

3Q (July 1 - Sept. 30, 2008)

    16.98     9.67  
 

4Q (Oct. 1 - Dec. 31, 2008)

    12.69     4.24  

        As of February 20, 2009, there were approximately 634 shareholders of our common stock. The price of the common stock was $7.95 as of the close of the market on February 20, 2009. We have not paid any dividends on our common stock since our inception and do not intend to pay any dividends in the foreseeable future. Declaration of dividends will depend, among other things, upon our operating and future earnings, our capital requirements and general business conditions.

Sales of Unregistered Equity Securities in the Quarter Ended December 31, 2008

        In October 2008, the Company, in settlement of 50% of a sublicense fee due to Duke University in connection with the $40 million license fee received from Pfizer and as permitted under the license agreement with Duke, issued to Duke 81,512 shares of the Company's $.001 par value common stock having an aggregate market value of $1,182,587, or $14.51 per share.

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CELLDEX THEAPEUTICS, INC., NASDAQ MARKET INDEX-U.S. AND
PEER GROUP INDICES

        The graph below compares the cumulative total stockholder return on the common stock for the period from December 31, 2003 through December 31, 2008, with the cumulative return on (i) NASDAQ Market Index—U.S. Companies and (ii) NASDAQ Pharmaceutical Index. The comparison assumes investment of $100 on December 31, 2003 in our common stock and in each of the indices and, in each case, assumes reinvestment of all dividends.

GRAPHIC

 
  12/31/03   12/31/04   12/30/05   12/29/06   12/31/07   12/31/08  

Celldex Therapeutics, Inc. 

  $ 100   $ 73   $ 69   $ 49   $ 18   $ 24  

NASDAQ Stock Market (U.S.) Index

  $ 100   $ 109   $ 111   $ 122   $ 132   $ 64  

NASDAQ Pharmaceutical Stock Index

  $ 100   $ 107   $ 117   $ 115   $ 121   $ 112  

        See Item 11 for information regarding our equity compensation plan.

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Item 6.    SELECTED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL DATA

        Selected consolidated financial data is presented below for the years ended December 31, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, and 2004. On March 7, 2008, the merger between AVANT and Celldex became effective. The merger was accounted for using the purchase method of accounting and was treated as the acquisition of AVANT, a publicly registered company, by Celldex, a private company. Accordingly, the financial information presented below for periods prior to March 8, 2008 reflects the financial position and the results of operations of Celldex alone, and for periods from March 8, 2008 forward the combined financial position and combined results of operations of AVANT and Celldex. AVANT Immunotherapeutics, Inc. changed its name to Celldex Therapeutics, Inc. on October 1, 2008. All amounts are in thousands except per share data.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS DATA

 
  2008   2007   2006(2)   2005   2004  

REVENUE:

                               

Product Development and Licensing

  $ 3,716   $ 466   $ 466   $ 14   $  

Contracts and Grants

    533     940     433     57      

Product Sales and Royalty

    3,207                  
                       
 

Total Revenue

    7,456     1,406     899     71      
                       

OPERATING EXPENSE:

                               

Research and Development

    26,347     9,892     10,013     4,826     4,480  

Acquired In-Process Research and Development(3)

    14,756             8,447      

Other Operating Expense

    15,109     7,022     9,681     4,167     1,586  
                       
 

Total Operating Expense

    56,212     16,914     19,694     17,440     6,066  
                       

Investment and Other Income, Net

    1,255     435     960     290      
                       
 

Net Loss

 
$

(47,501

)

$

(15,073

)

$

(17,835

)

$

(17,079

)

$

(6,066

)
                       

Basic and Diluted Net Loss Per Common Share

 
$

(3.34

)

$

(1.81

)

$

(2.15

)

$

(3.00

)

$

(1.22

)
                       

Weighted Average Common Shares Outstanding(1)

    14,217     8,309     8,279     5,699     4,961  
                       

(1)
Weighted average common shares outstanding for the years 2004 to 2007 have been adjusted to reflect the Merger exchange ratio and a reverse stock split of 1-for-12 effective March 7, 2008.

(2)
As discussed in Note 3 to the consolidated financial statements, the Company changed the manner in which it accounts for stock-based compensation in 2006.

(3)
The 2008 amount arose as a result of the merger between AVANT and Celldex. The 2005 amount arose from the acquisition of Lorantis Limited.

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET DATA

 
  2008   2007   2006   2005   2004  

Working Capital

  $ 32,975   $ (4,438 ) $ 12,178   $ 24,852   $ (467 )

Total Assets

    69,793     9,375     22,163     33,133     1,283  

Long Term Liabilities

    37,558     370     914     1,152      

Accumulated Deficit

    (121,149 )   (73,648 )   (58,575 )   (40,739 )   (23,660 )

Total Stockholders' Equity (Deficit)

    18,134     (1,132 )   15,144     28,007     816  

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        Safe Harbor Statement under the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995:    Statements contained in the following, Item 7. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations, that are not historical facts may be forward-looking statements that are subject to a variety of risks and uncertainties. Forward-looking statements include statements with respect to our beliefs, plans, objectives, goals, expectations, anticipations, assumptions, estimates, intentions and future performance, and involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors, which may be beyond our control, and which may cause our actual results, performance or achievements to be materially different from future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. All statements other than statements of historical fact are statements that could be forward-looking statements. You can identify these forward-looking statements through our use of words such as "may," "will," "can," "anticipate," "assume," "should," "indicate," "would," "believe," "contemplate," "expect," "seek," "estimate," "continue," "plan," "point to," "project," "predict," "could," "intend," "target," "potential" and other similar words and expressions of the future.

        There are a number of important factors that could cause the actual results to differ materially from those expressed in any forward-looking statement made by us. These factors include, but are not limited to:

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        All forward-looking statements are expressly qualified in their entirety by this cautionary notice. You are cautioned not to place undue reliance on any forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date of this report or the date of the document incorporated by reference into this report. We have no obligation, and expressly disclaim any obligation, to update, revise or correct any of the forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise. We have expressed our expectations, beliefs and projections in good faith and we believe they have a reasonable basis. However, we cannot assure you that our expectations, beliefs or projections will result or be achieved or accomplished.

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Item 7.    MANAGEMENT'S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

        As used herein, the terms "we," "us," "our," the "Company", or "Celldex" refer to Celldex Therapeutics, Inc., a Delaware corporation organized in 1983 (formerly known as AVANT Immunotherapeutics, Inc.) and its subsidiaries: Celldex Research Corporation ("Celldex Research"), Celldex Therapeutics, Ltd. ("Celldex Ltd") and Megan Health, Inc. ("Megan"). The Company's principal activity since our inception has been research and product development conducted on our own behalf, as well as through joint development programs with several pharmaceutical companies and other collaborators. The Company changed its name from AVANT Immunotherapeutics, Inc. to Celldex Therapeutics, Inc. on October 1, 2008.

OVERVIEW

        We are a biopharmaceutical company that uses novel applications of immunology to develop products for the prevention and treatment of diseases. Using our Precision Targeted Immunotherapy Platform, we are developing a broad portfolio of vaccines, therapeutic antibodies and other targeted immunotherapeutics addressing a wide range of applications including oncology, inflammatory and infectious diseases. These include therapeutic cancer vaccines, monoclonal antibodies, single-dose, oral vaccines that protect against important disease-causing infectious agents and a treatment to reduce complement-mediated tissue damage. We are advancing a robust pipeline of clinical and preclinical product candidates, the most advanced of which are for treatment of various cancers. Our lead programs are therapeutic cancer vaccines designed to instruct the patient's immune system to recognize and destroy cancer cells.

        Our strategy is to demonstrate proof-of-concept for our product candidates before leveraging their value through partnerships or, in appropriate situations, continuing late stage development ourselves. Demonstrating proof-of-concept for a product candidate generally involves bringing it through Phase 1 clinical trials and one or more Phase 2 clinical trials so that we are able to demonstrate, based on human trials, good safety data for the product candidate and some data indicating its effectiveness. Our current collaborations encompass the commercialization of an oral human rotavirus vaccine, the development of oral cholera, typhoid fever, ETEC and HIV vaccines, and a therapeutic brain cancer vaccine. Our product candidates address large market opportunities for which we believe current therapies are inadequate or non-existent.

        We are targeting our efforts where we can add the greatest value to the development of our products and technologies. Our goal is to demonstrate clinical proof-of-concept for each product, and then seek excellent partners to help see those products through to commercialization. We thus leverage the value of its technology portfolio through corporate, governmental and non-governmental partnerships. This approach allows us to maximize the overall value of our technology and product portfolio while best ensuring the expeditious development of each individual product.

Merger between AVANT and Celldex

        On March 7, 2008, we closed the merger (the "Merger") contemplated by the Agreement and Plan of Merger dated October 19, 2007 by and among Celldex (formerly AVANT Immunotherapeutics, Inc.), Callisto Merger Corporation ("Merger Sub"), a wholly owned subsidiary of Celldex, and Celldex Research (formerly Celldex Therapeutics, Inc.) (the "Merger Agreement"). Pursuant to the terms of the Merger Agreement, Merger Sub merged with and into Celldex Research, with Celldex Research as the surviving company and a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company. The total value of the transaction was approximately $75 million. Approximately 8.7 million shares were issued to the former Celldex Research shareholders in connection with the Merger. The Merger created a NASDAQ-listed, fully-integrated and diversified biopharmaceutical company with a deep pipeline of product candidates

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addressing high-value indications including oncology, infectious and inflammatory diseases. Former Celldex Research and former AVANT shareholders owned 58% and 42% of the combined company on a fully diluted basis, respectively.

        Our board of directors approved a 1-for-12 reverse stock split of the Company's common stock, which became effective on March 7, 2008. As a result of the reverse stock split, each twelve shares of common stock were combined and reclassified into one share of common stock and the total number of shares outstanding was reduced from approximately 180 million shares (including the shares issued to former Celldex Research stockholders in the Merger) to approximately 15 million shares.

        The Merger was accounted for using the purchase method of accounting and was treated as an acquisition by Celldex Research of Celldex (then AVANT), with Celldex Research being considered the accounting acquirer based on the application of criteria specified in Statement of Financial Accounting Standards "SFAS" No. 141, Business Combinations, ("SFAS 141"), even though Celldex (then AVANT) was the issuer of common stock and the surviving legal entity in the transaction. Under the purchase method of accounting, the purchase price was allocated to the acquired tangible and identifiable intangible assets and assumed liabilities, based upon their fair value at the date of acquisition, as follows:

Tangible assets acquired

  $ 34,959,482  
 

Less: Liabilities assumed

    (3,945,067 )
       

Net tangible assets acquired

    31,014,415  

Intangible assets acquired:

       
 

Core Technology

    897,249  
 

Developed Technology

    273,796  
 

Strategic Partner Agreement

    629,499  
 

In-Process Research and Development ("IPR&D")

    14,755,908  
       
 

Total

  $ 47,570,867  
       

        The values assigned to the intangible assets acquired, including the IPR&D, were determined based on fair market value using a risk adjusted discounted cash flow approach. Fair values for long-term tangible and intangible assets and for IPR&D were then reduced by $6,041,597 of negative goodwill. The Company is a biotechnology enterprise and its resources are substantially devoted to research and development at the date of the Merger. Management is responsible for determining the fair value of the acquired IPR&D.

        The values assigned to IPR&D relate to the development of a typhoid-ETEC-cholera combination travelers vaccine, a cholesterol management vaccine, and the CDX-1135 (formerly TP10) complement inhibitor in the amounts of $7.8 million, $0.9 million and $6 million, respectively. Each of these three significant research and development projects in-process were valued through detailed analysis of product development data concerning the stage of development, time and resources needed to complete the project, expected income-generating ability and associated risks. The value of IPR&D was determined by estimating the costs to develop the purchased in-process technology into commercially viable products, estimating the net cash flows from such projects and discounting the net cash flows back to their present values. The probability of success and discount rates used for each project take into account the uncertainty surrounding the successful development and commercialization of the purchased in-process technology. We expect to incur approximately $16.2 million to move these projects to the point of out-licensing them to third parties. The estimated revenues from the typhoid-ETEC-cholera vaccine, the cholesterol management vaccine, and CDX-1135 are expected to be generated beginning in 2014, 2015 and 2014, respectively. A discount rate of 29% was used to value these projects, which we believe to be commensurate with the stage of development and the uncertainties in the economic estimates described above. The resulting net cash flows for these projects

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were based on management's best estimates of revenue, cost of sales, research and development costs, selling, general and administrative costs, and income taxes for each project and the net cash flows reflect assumptions that would be used by market participants.

        The significant assumptions underlying the valuations included potential revenues, costs of completion, the timing of product approvals and the selection of appropriate probability of success and discount rates. None of the Company's IPR&D projects have reached technological feasibility nor do they have any alternative future use. Consequently, in accordance with current U.S. GAAP, the fair value allocated to IPR&D was charged as an expense in the Company's consolidated financial statements as of the date of acquisition. The remaining acquired intangible assets arising from the acquisition are being amortized on a straight line basis over their estimated lives, which range from 4.5 to 8 years.

        As of December 31, 2008, the technological feasibility of the projects had not yet been reached and no significant departures from the assumptions included in the valuation analysis had occurred. Substantial additional research and development will be required prior to reaching technological feasibility. In addition, each product needs to successfully complete a series of clinical trials and to receive FDA or other regulatory approval prior to commercialization. The Company is also dependent upon the activities of its collaborators in developing, manufacturing and marketing its products. There can be no assurance that these projects will ever reach feasibility or develop into products that can be marketed profitably, nor can there be assurance that the Company and its collaborators will be able to develop, manufacture and commercialize these products before the Company's competitors. If these products are not successfully developed and do not become commercially viable, the Company's financial condition and results of operations could be materially affected. See Note 17 to the Company's consolidated financial statements for additional information.

        Because Celldex Research was determined to be the acquirer for accounting purposes, the historical financial statements of Celldex Research became the historical financial statements of the Company. Accordingly, the financial statements of the Company prior to the Merger reflect the financial position, results of operations and cash flows of Celldex Research, which, during the historical periods presented in the accompanying consolidated financial statements, was majority-owned by Medarex, Inc. ("Medarex"). Following the Merger, the financial statements of the current period reflect the financial position, results of operation and cash flows of the Company. The results of operations of AVANT are included in the results of operations of the Company beginning March 8, 2008. Accordingly, except as otherwise discussed below, this report reflects the financial condition, results of operations and liquidity of the combined companies at December 31, 2008 and historically of Celldex Research on a stand-alone basis for all periods prior to March 8, 2008. The financial condition, results of operations and liquidity of the Company as of the years ended December 31, 2008, 2007 and 2006 may not be indicative of the Company's future performance or reflect what the Company's financial conditions, results of operations and liquidity would have been had the Merger been consummated as of January 1, 2006, or had the Company operated as a separate, stand-alone entity during the periods presented.

Other Acquisitions

        In October 2005, Celldex Research completed the acquisitions of Lorantis Limited ("Lorantis") and Alteris Therapeutics, Inc. ("Alteris"). Celldex Research issued approximately 2.8 million shares of its Class A common stock (valued at $34.0 million) in exchange for all of the issued and outstanding shares of capital stock of Lorantis. Net assets acquired included approximately $31.1 million in cash, $2.7 million of fixed assets, a working capital deficit of $723,000 and $870,000 of in-process research and development ("IPR&D"), which was expensed in 2005. In addition, Celldex Research incurred approximately $671,000 of costs related to the acquisition of Lorantis, which were expensed to IPR&D

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in 2005. As of December 31, 2008, none of the acquired research and development projects had reached technological feasibility.

        The purchase price for the Alteris assets consisted of approximately 496,100 shares of Celldex Research common stock (valued at $6.0 million) and approximately $1.5 million in cash. Net assets acquired included approximately $6,000 of fixed assets, $1.3 million in acquired intangible assets and $6.2 million of IPR&D, which was expensed in 2005. In addition, Celldex Research incurred approximately $708,000 of costs related to the acquisition of Alteris, which were expensed to IPR&D in 2005. Celldex may be required to pay Alteris up to $5.0 million upon obtaining the first approval for commercial sale of an EGFRvIII product. As of December 31, 2008, none of the acquired research and development projects had reached technological feasibility.

RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ACTIVITIES

        Our products are derived from a broad set of complementary technologies which have the ability to utilize the human immune system and enable the creation of preventative and therapeutic agents. We are using these technologies to develop vaccines and targeted immunotherapeutics that prevent or treat cancer and disease caused by infectious organisms, and treatment vaccines that modify undesirable activity by the body's own proteins or cells. A number of our immunotherapeutic and vaccine product candidates are in various stages of clinical trials. We expect that a large percentage of our research and development expenses will be incurred in support of our current and future clinical trial programs.

        The expenditures that will be necessary to execute Celldex's business plan are subject to numerous uncertainties. Completion of clinical trials may take several years or more, and the length of time generally varies substantially according to the type, complexity, novelty and intended use of a product candidate. It is not unusual for the clinical development of these types of product candidates to each take five years or more, and for total development costs to exceed $100 million for each product candidate. Celldex estimates that clinical trials of the type we generally conduct are typically completed over the following timelines:

Clinical Phase
  Estimated
Completion
Period

Phase 1

  1 - 2 Years

Phase 2

  1 - 5 Years

Phase 3

  1 - 5 Years

        The duration and the cost of clinical trials may vary significantly over the life of a project as a result of differences arising during the clinical trial protocol, including, among others, the following:

        Celldex tests potential product candidates in numerous preclinical studies for safety, toxicology and immunogenicity. Celldex then may conduct multiple clinical trials for each product candidate. As we obtain results from trials, we may elect to discontinue or delay clinical trials for certain product candidates in order to focus our resources on more promising product candidates.

        An element of Celldex's business strategy is to pursue the research and development of a broad portfolio of product candidates. This is intended to allow Celldex to diversify the risks associated with its research and development expenditures. As a result, Celldex believes its future capital requirements

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and its future financial success are not substantially dependent on any one product candidate. To the extent Celldex is unable to maintain a broad range of product candidates, Celldex's dependence on the success of one or a few product candidates increases.

        Celldex's product candidates also have not yet received FDA regulatory approval, which is required before Celldex can market them as therapeutic or vaccine products. In order to proceed to subsequent clinical trial stages and to ultimately achieve regulatory approval, the FDA must conclude that Celldex's clinical data establish safety and efficacy. Historically, the results from preclinical testing and early clinical trials (through Phase 2) have often not been predictive of results obtained in later clinical trials. A number of new drugs, biologics and vaccines have shown promising results in early clinical trials, but subsequently failed to establish sufficient safety and efficacy data to obtain necessary regulatory approvals.

        Furthermore, Celldex's business strategy includes the option of entering into collaborative arrangements with third parties to complete the development and commercialization of Celldex's product candidates. In the event that third parties take over the clinical trial process for one of Celldex's product candidates, the estimated completion date would largely be under control of that third party rather than Celldex. Celldex cannot forecast with any degree of certainty which proprietary products, if any, will be subject to future collaborative arrangements, in whole or in part, and how such arrangements would affect Celldex's development plan or capital requirements. Celldex's programs may also benefit from subsidies, grants, contracts or government or agency-sponsored studies that could reduce Celldex's development costs.

        As a result of the uncertainties discussed above, among others, Celldex is unable to estimate the duration and completion costs of its research and development projects or when, if ever, and to what extent it will receive cash inflows from the commercialization and sale of a product. Celldex's inability to complete its research and development projects in a timely manner or its failure to enter into collaborative agreements, when appropriate, could significantly increase its capital requirements and could adversely impact its liquidity. These uncertainties could force Celldex to seek additional, external sources of financing from time to time in order to continue with its business strategy. Celldex's inability to raise additional capital, or to do so on terms reasonably acceptable to it, would jeopardize the future success of its business. During the past five years through the end of 2008, Celldex incurred an aggregate of $55.7 million in research and development costs. During the year ended December 31, 2008, Celldex incurred an aggregate of $26.3 million in research and development costs.


CURRENT PROGRAMS AND PARTNERSHIPS

Technology
  Product   Indication/Field   Partner   Status
ONCOLOGY   CDX-110   Glioblastoma multiforme   Pfizer   Phase 2b
    CDX-1307   Colorectal, bladder, pancreas, ovarian and breast tumors     Phase 1
    CDX-1401   Multiple Solid Tumors     Pre-clinical
    CDX-1127   Immuno-modulation, multiple tumors     Pre-clinical

INFLAMMATORY DISEASE

 

CDX-1135 (formerly TP10)

 

Transplantation
Renal disease

 



 

Phase 1/2
Pre-clinical
    CDX-1189   Renal disease     Pre-clinical

INFECTIOUS DISEASE

 

CholeraGarde®

 

Cholera

 

Vaccine Technologies/IVI

 

Phase 2b
    Ty800   Typhoid fever   NIH   Phase 2
    ETEC   Enterotoxigenic E coli infection   Vaccine Technologies/NIH   Phase 1
    CDX-2401   HIV infection   Rockefeller University   Pre-clinical

MARKETED PRODUCTS

 

Rotarix®

 

Rotavirus infection

 

GlaxoSmithKline

 

Marketed

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PROGRAM DEVELOPMENTS

A.    Cancer Vaccine Development Programs

        CDX-110:    Our lead clinical development program, CDX-110, is a peptide-based immunotherapy that targets the tumor specific molecule called EGFRvIII, a functional variant of the naturally expressed epidermal growth factor receptor ("EGFR"), a protein which has been well validated as a target for cancer therapy. Unlike EGFR, EGFRvIII is not present in normal tissues, and has been shown to be a transforming oncogene that can directly contribute to the cancer cell growth.

        EGFRvIII is commonly present in glioblastoma multiforme, or GBM, the most common and aggressive form of brain cancer, and has also been observed in various other cancers such as breast, ovarian, prostate, colorectal, and head & neck cancer. With our partner, Pfizer Inc. ("Pfizer"), we are currently pursuing the development of CDX-110 for GBM therapy and plan to expand the clinical development into other cancers through additional clinical studies.

        Initial clinical development of EGFRvIII immunotherapy was led by collaborating investigators at the Brain Center at Duke Comprehensive Cancer Center in Durham, North Carolina and at M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, Texas. The results from the Phase 1 (VICTORI) and Phase 2a (ACTIVATE) studies, which enrolled 16 and 21 patients, respectively, have demonstrated a significant increase in the time to disease progression (greater than 113%) in the patients who were vaccinated, and also in overall survival rates (greater than 100%), both relative to appropriately matched historical controls. An extension of the Phase 2a program (ACT II) at the same two institutions has enrolled 23 additional GBM patients treated in combination with temozolomide (the current standard of care). Preliminary results from this study (ACT II) currently estimates median overall survival to be 33.1 months, although the median has not yet been reached. The survival of a matched historical control group was 14.3 months and a subgroup treated with temozolomide (TMZ) of 15.2 months, with a p value = 0.0078. Overall time to progression for CDX-110 was 16.6 months compared with 6.4 months for the historical control group.

        In May 2007, we initiated a Phase 2b/3 randomized study (ACT III) of CDX-110 combined with standard of care, temozolomide, versus standard of care alone in patients with GBM. We intend to open a total of over 30 sites in the United States for the study. The FDA has granted orphan drug designation for CDX-110 for the treatment of EGFRvIII expressing GBM as well as fast track designation.

        In December 2008, we announced an amendment to convert the ACT III study to a single-arm Phase 2 clinical trial in which all patients will receive CDX-110 in combination with temozolomide and we will continue to enroll to approximately 60 patients. The decision, which follows the recommendation of the Independent Data Monitoring Committee, was based on the observation that the majority of patients randomized to the control (standard of care) arm withdrew from this open-label study after being randomized to the control arm. Patients currently participating on the control arm of the study will be offered the option to receive treatment with CDX-110. Under this amendment, the ACT III study will provide a multi-center, non-randomized dataset for CDX-110 in patients with newly diagnosed GBM. These data will provide important additional information that can be used to better design the future development of CDX-110.

        On April 16, 2008, the Company and Pfizer entered into a License and Development Agreement (the "Pfizer Agreement") under which Pfizer was granted an exclusive worldwide license to CDX-110. The Pfizer Agreement also gives Pfizer exclusive rights to the use of EGFRvIII vaccines in other potential indications. Under the Pfizer Agreement, Pfizer made an upfront payment to the Company of $40 million and made a $10 million equity investment in the Company. Pfizer will fund all development costs for these programs. The Company is also eligible to receive potential milestone payments exceeding $390 million for the successful development and commercialization of CDX-110 and additional EGFRvIII vaccine products, as well as royalties on any product sales. The Pfizer Agreement

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became effective after clearance under the Hart-Scott-Rodino Antitrust Improvements Act of 1976 (as amended) on May 19, 2008.

        CDX-1307:    The Company's lead APC Targeting Technology™ product candidate, CDX-1307, is in development for the treatment of epithelial tumors such as colorectal, pancreatic, bladder, ovarian and breast cancers. CDX-1307 targets the beta chain of human chorionic gonadotropin, known as hCG-Beta, which is an antigen often found in epithelial tumors. The presence of hCG-Beta in these cancers correlates with a poor clinical outcome, suggesting that this molecule may contribute to tumor growth. Normal adult tissues have minimal expression of hCG-Beta; therefore, targeted immune responses are not expected to generate significant side effects.

        Celldex is completing two Phase 1 studies at multiple centers that are designed to explore safety and dose/effect relationships via two administration routes—intradermal (ID), a traditional vaccine route that allows efficient access to local dermal dendritic cells and intravenous (IV), a novel systemic approach to vaccination that might target a much larger population of dendritic cells. In both studies, there are dose escalations of CDX-1307 alone and CDX-1307 with the adjuvant GM-CSF (known to increase mannose receptor expression on dendritic cells). At the highest dose levels planned, additional immune system modulators (Toll-Like Receptor Agonists, or TLR agonists) have been added to determine what effect they have in augmenting an immune response. Patients with an assortment of different tumor types that are known to express hCG-Beta are being accrued with retrospective analysis for hCG-Beta expression. A four dose regimen is utilized with the possibility of retreatment if patients demonstrate tumor regression or stable disease.

        Over fifty (50) patients with epithelial cancers have been treated in the Phase 1 clinical trials and more than half have evidence of hCG-Beta expression by their tumor. The immunotherapy has been well tolerated with only minor adverse events observed (reddening at the injection site). Analysis of the initial cohorts with GM-CSF have revealed that several patients developed good humoral responses to hCG-Beta, and some have demonstrated enhancement of circulating hCG-Beta-specific CD8 T cells. Thus, we are encouraged that CDX-1307 is providing similar results as predicted in the pre-clinical studies. In addition, one patient with pancreatic cancer had a 26% overall reduction in tumor burden and two breast cancer patients were stable for six months during treatment. The investigators at the Duke Comprehensive Cancer Center were awarded a two year $500,000 grant from the Avon Foundation and the National Cancer Institute to support Phase 1 work in breast cancer. The safety of CDX-1307 in combination with defined immune system modulators is now being evaluated with intent to enter Phase 2 clinical research in the second half of 2009.

        CDX-1401:    CDX-1401 is a fusion protein consisting of a fully human monoclonal antibody with specificity for the dendritic cell receptor, DEC-205, linked to the NY-ESO-1 tumor antigen. In humans, NY-ESO-1 is one of the most immunogenic tumor antigens and has been detected in 20-30% of cancers, thus representing a broad opportunity. This product is intended to selectively deliver the NY-ESO-1 antigen to APCs for generating robust immune responses against cancer cells expressing NY-ESO-1. Unlike CDX-1307, which targets the mannose receptor expressing dendritic cells, CDX-1401 is the first APC product targeting DEC-205 expressing dendritic cells. We are developing CDX-1401 for the treatment of malignant melanoma and a variety of solid tumors which express the proprietary cancer antigen NY-ESO-1, which the Company licensed from the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research in 2006. The Company believes that preclinical studies have shown that CDX-1401 is effective for activation of human T-cell responses against NY-ESO-1. The IND filing is planned for the first half of 2009. We expect to be able to enter a Phase 1 study with a combination regimen, including TLRs, and will accrue multiple tumors that express NY-ESO-1.

        CDX-1127:    Celldex has entered into a License Agreement with the University of Southampton, UK, to develop human antibodies to CD27, a potentially important target for immunotherapy of various cancers. In pre-clinical models, antibodies to CD27 alone have been shown to mediate

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anti-tumor effects, and may be particularly effective in combination with other immunotherapies. CD27 is a critical molecule in the activation pathway of lymphocytes. It is downstream from CD40, and may provide a novel way to regulate the immune responses. Engaging CD27 with the appropriate monoclonal antibody has proven highly effective at promoting anti-cancer immunity in mouse models. We are currently evaluating new human monoclonal antibodies in pre-clinical models.

B.    Inflammatory Disease Development Programs

        CDX-1135 (formerly TP10):    We have been developing immunotherapeutics that inhibit a part of the immune system called the complement system. The complement system is a series of proteins that are important initiators of the body's acute inflammatory response against disease, infection and injury. Excessive complement activation also plays a role in some persistent inflammatory conditions. Our lead compound, CDX-1135, a soluble form of naturally occurring Complement Receptor 1, has effectively shown to inhibit the activation of the complement cascade in animal models and in human clinical trials. We believe that regulating the complement system could have therapeutic and prophylactic applications in several acute and chronic conditions, including organ transplantation, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, age-related macular degeneration ("AMD"), atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome and myasthenia gravis. We are currently defining the most appropriate clinical development path for CDX-1135 and are focusing on rare disease conditions of unregulated complement activation as the fastest route to FDA approval.

        CDX-1189:    Celldex is developing therapeutic human antibodies to a signaling molecule known as CD89 or Fca receptor type I (FcaRI). CD89 is expressed by some white blood cells and leukemic cell lines, and has been shown to be important in controlling inflammation and tumor growth in animal models. Celldex has proprietary, fully human antibodies to CD89 in preclinical development. Depending upon the specific antibody used, anti-CD89 antibodies can either be activating and thus stimulate immune responses, or down-regulating and act as an anti-inflammatory agent.

C.    Infectious Disease Development Programs

        CholeraGarde® Vaccine:    CholeraGarde® is designed to be a safe, effective single-dose, oral cholera vaccine. Our partner, the International Vaccine Institute ("IVI"), has received $21 million in funding from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation for a Cholera Vaccine Initiative ("CHOVI"), includes conducting further clinical trials of CholeraGarde®. The IVI is presently conducting a Phase 2 clinical trial of CholeraGarde in Bangladesh, with plans to sponsor additional Phase 2 studies in India and Thailand beginning in the first half of 2009, followed by Phase 3 field studies.

        ETEC Vaccine:    In November 2007, we entered into an agreement with the Division of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases of the NIAID, whereby NIAID is sponsoring a Phase 1 study of Celldex's investigational single-dose, oral vaccine designed to offer combined protection against both enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) and cholera. In June 2008, NIAID initiated the Phase 1 trial of the ETEC vaccine candidate at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center.

        In January 2009, we entered into an Exclusive License and Development Agreement with Vaccine Technologies, Inc. ("VTI"). Under the license agreement, Celldex has granted a worldwide fee- and royalty-bearing exclusive license to VTI to development and commercialize Celldex's CholeraGarde® and ETEC vaccine programs. Financial terms of the agreement with VTI include an upfront license fee, milestone payments and royalties on net sales of licensed products during the term of the agreement.

        Ty800 Typhoid Fever Vaccine:    The Company has developed an oral vaccine to offer rapid, single-dose protection against Salmonella typhi, the cause of typhoid fever. Ty800 is targeted for both the travelers' market and global health needs. In 2006, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease ("NIAID") of the National Institutes of Health ("NIH") initiated a Phase 1/2 in-patient

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dose-ranging clinical trial aimed at demonstrating the safety and immunogenicity of the Ty800 typhoid fever vaccine. NIAID funded the production of Ty800 vaccine for clinical testing and completed the Phase 1/2 trial at a NIH-funded clinical site in 2007. Results showed the single-dose, oral vaccine to be well tolerated and immunogenic, with over 90% of vaccinated subjects generating immune responses. We initiated our own sponsored Phase 2 trial of Ty800 in July 2007. Preliminary results reported in April 2008 from the study showed that the single-dose, oral vaccine was well tolerated and immunogenic, demonstrating that the desired immune response was achieved. Incidence of reactogenicity symptoms and adverse events post-vaccination were similar to placebo. Importantly, immunogenic response was dose-dependent. Positive immune response or seroconversion (prospectively defined as a 4-fold increase in anti-LPS titers over pre-dose level) rates were 65.5% (36/55) and 80% (44/55) in the low and high dose groups, respectively, and was significantly (p<0.001) higher than placebo.

        CDX-2401:    The Company is also using its APC Targeting Technology™ to develop vaccines against infectious disease. The lead program is CDX-2401, an APC-Targeting prophylactic vaccine, aimed at providing protection from infection with HIV, the virus known to cause AIDS. This program is in a Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation funded partnership with collaborators at Rockefeller University in New York City, who have shown in model systems that protective immunity can be induced with such a vaccine. Preclinical studies and manufacturing development are in progress and the Company, with its collaborators, plans to file an IND for Phase 1 clinical studies in the first half of 2009.

D.    Marketed Products

        Rotavirus Vaccine:    Rotavirus is a major cause of diarrhea and vomiting in infants and children. In 1997, we licensed our oral rotavirus strain to GlaxoSmithKline ("Glaxo"). All of the ongoing development for this program is being conducted and funded by Glaxo. Glaxo gained approval for its rotavirus vaccine, Rotarix®, in Mexico in July 2004, which represented the first in a series of worldwide approvals and commercial launches for the product. Glaxo subsequently launched Rotarix® in additional Latin American and Asian Pacific countries during 2005 - 2007. Additionally, Glaxo filed for market approval with the European regulatory authorities in late 2004, which triggered a $2 million milestone payment to the Company. In February 2006, the European Commission granted approval of Rotarix® in the European Union, which triggered a $4 million milestone payment from Glaxo. On April 3, 2008, Rotarix® received approval from the FDA for the prevention of rotavirus gastroenteritis in infants. FDA approval triggered a $1.5 million milestone payment from Glaxo, of which $750,000 was retained by the Company. We licensed-in the rotavirus strain in 1995 and owe a license fee of 30% to Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center ("CCH") on net royalties received from Glaxo. In May 2005, the Company entered into an agreement whereby an affiliate of Paul Royalty Fund ("PRF") purchased an interest in the net royalties the Company will receive on worldwide sales of Rotarix® (see Note 10 of our consolidated financial statements). The market launch of Rotarix® by Glaxo in the U.S. market during the quarter ended September 30, 2008 resulted in a $10 million milestone payment to the Company from PRF, which the Company received on October 1, 2008. We have received a total of $60 million in milestone payments under the PRF agreement. No additional milestone payments are due from PRF under the agreement.

        In September 2006, we received notice from Glaxo that Glaxo would begin paying royalties on sales of Rotarix® vaccine at the lower of two royalty rates under their 1997 license agreement. Glaxo's decision to pay the lower royalty rate (which is 70% of the full rate) is based upon Glaxo's assertion that Rotarix® is not covered by the patents Glaxo licensed from the Company in Australia and certain European countries. If Glaxo's position stands, the royalties to which PRF is entitled will no longer be limited by a $27.5 million annual threshold, which the Company projected may have been reached in later years as sales of Rotarix® increased. Irrespective of Glaxo's position, we will still retain approximately 65% of the royalties on worldwide sales of Rotarix® once PRF receives 2.45 times the

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aggregate cash payments of $60 million it made to the Company, though the potential amount of such residual royalties will be lower if Glaxo's position stands.

        Megan®Vac 1 and Megan®Egg Vaccines:    On December 1, 2000, the Company acquired all of the outstanding capital stock of Megan. Megan has commercialized three veterinary vaccines; Argus™ SC, licensed by the United States Department of Agriculture ("USDA") in March 1998 and marketed by Intervet, Inc., and Megan®Vac 1 and Megan®Egg, licensed by the USDA in November 1998 and 2003, respectively, and marketed by Lohmann Animal Health International ("LAHI"). In January 2009, we sold the poultry vaccines business, consisting of Megan®Vac 1 and Megan®Egg, to LAHI for an upfront fee and potential milestone payments.

TECHNOLOGY LICENSING

        We have adopted a business strategy of out-licensing technology and programs that do not match our development focus or where we lack sufficient resources for the technology's or program's efficient development or where certain uses of the technology are outside of our focus. For example, when the Company acquired Megan, it entered into a licensing agreement in December 2000 with Pfizer's Animal Health Division to leverage the value of Megan's oral vaccine technology in a significant market opportunity (animal health and human food safety) outside of the Company's own focus on human health care. Under this Pfizer agreement, we may receive additional milestone payments of up to $3 million based upon attainment of specified milestones. We may receive royalty payments on eventual product sales. The term of this agreement is through the expiration of the last of the patents covered by the agreement.

        Similarly, in January 2009, we sold our poultry vaccines business, consisting of Megan®Vac 1 and Megan®Egg, to LAHI and out-licensed our CholeraGarde® and ETEC vaccine programs to VTI.

CRITICAL ACCOUNTING POLICIES

        Our significant accounting policies are described in Note 1 to the consolidated financial statements included in Item 8 of this Form 10-K. We believe our most critical accounting policies include revenue recognition for agreements entered into with various collaborators, accounting for long-lived assets, the amortization policy for acquired intangible assets and the estimates of costs incurred and assumptions made in recording accrued clinical research and contract manufacturing costs and assumptions made in calculating the fair value of stock-based compensation expense.

        The methods, estimates and judgments we use in applying our most critical accounting policies have a significant impact on the results we report in our consolidated financial statements. We evaluate our estimates and judgments on an on-going basis. We base our estimates on historical experience and on assumptions that we believe to be reasonable under the circumstances. Our experience and assumptions form the basis for our judgments about the carrying value of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources. Actual results may vary from what we anticipate and different assumptions or estimates about the future could materially change our reported results. We believe the following accounting policies are the most critical to us in that they are important to the portrayal of our financial statements and they require our most difficult, subjective or complex judgments in the preparation of our consolidated financial statements:

        Revenue Recognition:    The Company accounts for revenue arrangements that include multiple deliverables in accordance with Emerging Issues Task Force ("EITF") No. 00-21, Accounting for Revenue Arrangements with Multiple Deliverables ("EITF 00-21"). EITF 00-21 addresses how to determine whether an arrangement involving multiple deliverables contains more than one unit of accounting. In applying the guidance, revenue arrangements with multiple deliverables can only be considered as separate units of accounting if (i) the delivered item has value to the customer on a standalone basis, (ii) there is objective and reliable evidence of the fair value of the undelivered items

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and (iii) if the right of return exists, delivery of the undelivered items is considered probable and substantially in the control of the vendor. If these criteria are not met, the revenue elements must be considered a single unit of accounting for purposes of revenue recognition.

        Payments received to fund certain research activities are recognized as revenue in the period in which the research activities are performed. Payments received in advance that are related to future performance are deferred and recognized as revenue when the research projects are performed.

        The Company has entered into various license and development agreements with pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies. The terms of the agreements typically include non-refundable license fees, funding of research and development, payments based upon achievement of certain milestones and royalties on net product sales. Non-refundable license fees are recognized as contract and license fee revenue when the Company has a contractual right to receive such payments, provided that (i) a contractual arrangement exists, (ii) the contract price is fixed or determinable, (iii) the collection of the resulting receivable is reasonably assured and (iv) the Company has no further performance obligations under the license agreement. Upfront non-refundable fees associated with license and development agreements where the Company has continuing performance obligations under the terms of the agreement are recorded as deferred revenue and recognized as revenue over the estimated service period as the Company completes its obligations. Where the Company's level of effort is relatively constant over the performance period or no other pattern is estimable, the revenue is recognized on a straight-line basis. Revenue is limited to the lesser of the cumulative amount of payments received or the cumulative amount of revenue earned, as determined using the straight-line basis, as of the period ending date. If the estimated service period is subsequently modified, the period over which the upfront fee is recognized is modified accordingly on a prospective basis. The determination of the performance period involves judgment on management's part. Funding of research and development is recognized as revenue over the term of the applicable contract as costs are incurred related to that contract.

        Milestone payments are recognized as revenue upon the achievement of mutually agreed milestones, provided that (i) the milestone event is substantive and its achievement is not reasonably assured at the inception of the agreement, and (ii) there is no continuing performance obligations associated with the milestone payment. Revenues from milestone payments related to arrangements under which the Company has continuing performance obligations are recognized as revenue upon achievement of the milestone only if all of the following conditions are met: (i) the milestone payments are non-refundable; (ii) achievement of the milestone was not reasonably assured at the inception of the arrangement; (iii) substantive effort is involved in achieving the milestone; and, (iv) the amount of the milestone is reasonable in relation to the effort expended or the risk associated with achievement of the milestone. If any of these conditions are not met, the milestone payments are deferred and recognized as revenue over the term of the arrangement as Celldex completes its performance obligations.

        The Company has capitalized and deferred costs incurred in connection with the one-time signing and upfront payment (the initial deliverable) received with respect to a multiple deliverable arrangement. If there is deemed a single unit of accounting for such an arrangement, the capitalized deferred costs are amortized over the expected performance period of the arrangement.

        Revenue from contracts and grants, including U.S. government grants under Small Business Innovation Research ("SBIR"), is recognized as the services are performed and recorded as effort is expended on the contracted work and billed to the government or our contractual partners. Product royalty revenue consists of payments received from licensees for a portion of sales proceeds from products that utilize Celldex's licensed technologies and are recognized when the amount of and basis for such royalty payments are reported to us in accurate and appropriate form and in accordance with the related license agreement. Payments received in advance of activities being performed are recorded as deferred revenue. Any significant changes in the Company's estimates or assumptions could impact its revenue recognition.

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        Long-Lived Assets:    In the ordinary course of its business, the Company incurs substantial costs to construct property and equipment. The treatment of costs to construct these assets depends on the nature of the costs and the stage of construction. Costs incurred in the project planning and design phase, and in the construction and installation phase, are capitalized as part of the cost of the asset. The Company stops capitalizing costs when the asset is substantially complete and ready for its intended use. Determining the appropriate period during which to capitalize costs, and assessing whether particular costs qualify for capitalization, requires us to make significant judgments. These judgments can have a material impact on our reported results.

        For manufacturing property and equipment, the Company also capitalizes the cost of validating these assets for the underlying manufacturing process. Celldex completes the capitalization of validation costs when the asset is substantially complete and ready for its intended use. Costs capitalized include incremental labor and fringe benefits, and direct consultancy services.

        Property and equipment is stated at cost and depreciated over the estimated useful lives of the related assets using the straight-line method. Laboratory equipment and office furniture and equipment are depreciated over a five-year period and computer equipment is depreciated over a three-year period. Manufacturing equipment is amortized over a seven- to ten-year period. Leasehold improvements are amortized over the shorter of the estimated useful life or the non-cancelable term of the related lease, including any renewals that are reasonably assured of occurring. Property and equipment under construction is classified as construction in progress and is depreciated or amortized only after the asset is placed in service. Expenditures for maintenance and repairs are charged to expense whereas the costs of significant improvements which extend the life of the underlying asset are capitalized. Upon retirement or sale, the cost of assets disposed of and the related accumulated depreciation are eliminated and the related gains or losses are reflected in net income. Determining the economic lives of property and equipment requires us to make significant judgments that can materially impact our operating results.

        Amortization of Intangible Assets:    The Company has acquired intangible assets, which include core technology, developed technology and a strategic partner agreement, through the Merger and the acquisition of Lorantis Limited. These acquired intangible assets are being amortized on a straight-line basis over their estimated lives, which range from 4.5 to 11 years. The determination of the amortization period involves estimates and judgments on management's part. Any significant changes in the Company's estimates or assumptions could impact the carrying value of acquired intangible assets. We evaluate the recoverability of these assets when facts and circumstances suggest the asset could be impaired in accordance with Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 144 ("SFAS 144"), "Accounting for the Impairment of Long-Lived Assets".

        Accounting for the Impairment of Long-Lived Assets:    The Company periodically evaluates its long-lived assets, primarily property and equipment and intangible assets for potential impairment under SFAS No. 144, Accounting for the Impairment of Long-Lived Assets, ("SFAS No. 144"). The Company performs these evaluations whenever events or changes in circumstances suggest that the carrying amount of an asset or group of assets is not recoverable. Indicators of potential impairment include:

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        If the Company believes an indicator of potential impairment exists, the carrying values of the assets are evaluated in relation to the operating performance and future undiscounted cash flows of the underlying asset. The net book value of an asset is adjusted to fair value if its expected future undiscounted cash flows are less than its book value. The Company charges impairments of the long-lived assets to operations if its evaluations indicate that the carrying value of these assets is not recoverable. We have identified no indicators of impairment at December 31, 2008. When we determine that the carrying value of intangible assets or long-lived assets is not recoverable, we may be required to record impairment charges for these assets that have not been previously recorded.

        Accrued Clinical Research and Contract Manufacturing Costs:    The preparation of financial statements requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amount of assets, the disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements, and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the period reported. Specifically, Celldex's management must make estimates of costs incurred to date, but not yet invoiced by external entities such as clinical research organizations ("CROs") and contract manufacturing organizations ("CMOs"). For CROs, management analyzes the progress of clinical trials, contract amendments for specific work, invoices received, and budgeted costs when evaluating the adequacy of the accrued liability. For CMOs, management analyzes the progress of process development and scale-up efforts and the production of clinical materials, contract amendments signed for specific work, invoices received, and budgeted costs when evaluating the adequacy of the accrued liability. The Company accrues these expenses based upon its assessment of the status of each study or manufacturing activity and the work completed, and upon information obtained from the CROs and CMOs. Significant management judgments and estimates must be made and used in connection with the accrued balance in any accounting period. Actual results may differ from the amount and timing of the accrued balance for any period.

        In connection with certain clinical research agreements the Company makes payments in advance of the services performed. The Company accounts for these payments under the provisions of EITF Issue No. 07-3 (EITF 07-3), Accounting for Advance Payments for Goods or Services to Be Used in Future Research and Development Activities. EITF 07-3 is limited to non-refundable advance payments for goods and services to be used or rendered in future research and development activities pursuant to an executory contractual arrangement. In accordance with this pronouncement, the Company capitalizes and defers these advanced payments to clinical research organizations, as other current assets, until the goods have been delivered or the related services have been performed.

        Stock-Based Compensation Expense:    We account for stock-based awards under SFAS No. 123(R), Share-Based Payment, ("SFAS No. 123(R)"), which requires the measurement and recognition of compensation expense for all share-based payment awards made to employees and directors including employee stock options and employee stock purchases related to the Employee Stock Purchase Plan ("employee stock purchases") based on estimated grant date fair values.

        Compensation expense for all share-based payment awards to employees are recognized using the straight-line method over the term of vesting or performance. As stock-based compensation expense recognized in the Consolidated Statement of Operations is based on awards ultimately expected to vest, compensation expense has been reduced for estimated forfeitures. SFAS No. 123(R) requires forfeitures to be estimated at the time of grant and revised, if necessary, in subsequent periods if actual forfeitures differ from those estimates.

        The Company estimates the fair value of share-based awards granted using the Black-Scholes option-pricing model ("Black-Scholes model"). The Company's determination of fair value of share-based payment awards on the date of grant using an option-pricing model is affected by the Company's stock price as well as assumptions regarding a number of highly complex and subjective variables. These variables include, but are not limited to, the Company's expected stock price volatility over the term of the awards, and actual and projected employee stock option exercise behaviors.

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        SFAS No. 123(R) did not change the accounting guidance for how the Company accounts for options issued to non-employees. The Company accounts for options issued to non-employees in accordance with SFAS No. 123(R) and EITF Issue No. 96-18, Accounting for Equity Instruments That Are Issued to Other Than Employees for Acquiring, or in Conjunction with Selling, Goods or Services. The value of such options is periodically re-measured and income or expense is recognized during the vesting terms.

        See Note 3 for additional information.

RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

        The financial statements of the Company prior to the Merger reflect the financial position, results of operations and cash flows of Celldex Research (then Celldex). Following the Merger, the financial statements of the current period reflect the financial position, results of operation and cash flows of the combined companies. The results of operations of AVANT are included in the results of operations of the Company beginning March 8, 2008. The discussions of results of operations, liquidity and capital resources below are of the combined companies for the period March 8, 2008 to December 31, 2008 and historically of Celldex Research on a stand-alone basis for all periods prior to March 8, 2008.

Fiscal Year Ended December 31, 2008 compared with Fiscal Year ended December 31, 2007

        The Company reported a consolidated net loss of $47,500,571, or $3.34 per share, for the year ended December 31, 2008, compared with a net loss of $15,073,050, or $1.81 per share, for the year ended December 31, 2007. The net loss for the year ended December 31, 2008 includes the combined operating expenses for the two companies and a one-time non-cash charge of $14,755,908 for purchased in-process research and development related to the Merger which closed in March 2008. The weighted average common shares outstanding used to calculate net loss per common share was 14,217,388 in 2008 and 8,309,420 in 2007.

Revenue

        Total revenue increased to $7,455,507 for 2008 compared to $1,405,592 for 2007.

        Product development and licensing revenue increased to $3,715,957 in 2008 from $466,156 in 2007 primarily due to the recognition of $2,870,359 of Pfizer deferred revenue and $225,000 of Glaxo milestone revenue payable to CCH. For the years ended December 31, 2008 and 2007, the Company recognized $466,156 of revenue under the Corixa termination agreement.

        Contract and grant revenue decreased by $406,254 to $533,182 for work performed in 2008 from $939,436 in 2007 primarily due to lower levels of vaccine development work billable to Rockefeller and Harvard in 2008.

        Product royalty revenue was $3,206,368 in 2008, consisting of $3,034,565 related to the Company's retained interests in Rotarix® net royalties which were not sold to PRF and which is equal to the amount payable to CCH and recognized in research and development expense by the Company, and $171,803 related to royalties on Megan®Vac 1 and Megan®Egg product sales. There was no product royalty revenue in 2007.

Operating Expense

        Total operating expense increased to $56,211,495 for the year ended December 31, 2008 compared to $16,914,128 for the year ended December 31, 2007. Operating expense for 2008 includes a one-time non-cash charge of $14,755,908 for purchased in-process research and development related to the Merger in March 2008.

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        Research and development expenses consist primarily of (i) personnel expenses, (ii) facilities and supply expenses relating to Celldex's technology, (iii) development costs associated with Celldex's product candidates, (iv) fees paid to third parties in conjunction with Celldex's clinical and preclinical development programs, and (v) license fees on in-licensed technologies and royalty fees on out-licensed programs. Research and development expense in 2008 increased by $16,455,480 to $26,347,189 from $9,891,709 in 2007. The changes relate primarily to the merger of the two companies and to costs associated with the following:

        General and administrative expense increased $7,841,905 to $14,747,392 in 2008 compared to $6,905,487 in 2007 and was primarily attributed to increases in stock-based compensation expense of $1,985,593 for stock option awards, severance expense of $1,373,874, legal and patent expense of $1,963,399, facility-related expenses of $1,075,448, insurance expenses of $590,061 and professional services of $564,935. The Company expects general and administrative expense to increase in 2009 as the Company adds infrastructure to support its therapeutic product pipeline and new product candidates.

        Amortization expense of acquired intangible assets increased $244,074 to $361,006 in 2008 compared to $116,932 in 2007 and the increase was a result of the intangible assets acquired in

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connection with the Merger. The Company expects amortization expense of acquired intangible assets to decrease in 2009 unless additional acquisitions are made.

Investment and Other Income, Net

        Interest and other income increased $819,931 to $1,255,417 in 2008 compared to $435,486 in 2007. The increase was primarily due to higher average cash balances in 2008 compared to 2007 and the recognition of $946,800 in income from Paul Capital relating to the $10 million milestone payment for the Rotarix® U.S. launch, offset in part by interest expense of $155,972 in 2008 compared to none in 2007, lower interest rates in 2008 and the loss on sale of Select Vaccine shares.

Fiscal Year Ended December 31, 2007 compared with Fiscal Year ended December 31, 2006

        Celldex reported a net loss of $15,073,050, or $1.81 per share, for the year ended December 31, 2007, a decrease of $2,762,212, or 15.5%, compared to a net loss of $17,835,262, or $2.15 per share, for the year ended December 31, 2006. The decrease in net loss between periods was due to decreased operating expenses, offset partially by increased revenues, investment and other income. The weighted average common shares outstanding used to calculate the net loss per common share was 8,309,420 in 2007 and 8,278,500 in 2006.

Revenue

        Revenues totaled $1,405,592 and $899,184 for the years ended December 31, 2007 and 2006 respectively, an increase of $506,408, or 56.3%. Because revenues depend to a large extent on the grants and product development efforts of Celldex's collaborators, Celldex's period-to-period revenues can fluctuate significantly and are inherently difficult to predict.

Operating Expense

        Research and development expenses consist primarily of (i) personnel expenses, (ii) facilities and supply expenses relating to Celldex's technology, (iii) development costs associated with Celldex's product candidates and (iv) fees paid to third parties in conjunction with Celldex's clinical and preclinical development programs. Research and development expenses decreased by $121,094, or 1.2%, from $10,012,803 to $9,891,709, during the year ended December 31, 2007, as compared to the year ended December 31, 2006. The changes relate primarily to costs associated with the following:

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        Celldex's general and administrative costs for the year ended December 31, 2007 were $6,905,487, a decrease of $1,490,214, or 17.7%, as compared to the year ended December 31, 2006. The decrease was primarily due to exiting of the U.K. facility and costs of operating the facility. This was partially offset by increased outside accounting and legal fees, stock-based compensation expense and Celldex's ongoing operations. General and administrative expenses, include salaries, benefits, stock based compensation, accounting, legal, business development and corporate administrative expense, including facility, travel, and other related expense.

Investment and Other Income, Net

        Interest and other income decreased $524,200 to $435,486 in 2007 compared to $959,686 in 2006. The decrease was primarily due to lower cash balances in 2007 compared to 2006.

LIQUIDITY AND CAPITAL RESOURCES

        At December 31, 2008, the Company's principal sources of liquidity consisted of cash and cash equivalents of $44,257,286. The Company's cash and cash equivalents are highly liquid investments with a maturity of three months or less at the date of purchase and consist of time deposits and investments in money market mutual funds with commercial banks and financial institutions. Also, the Company maintains cash balances with financial institutions in excess of insured limits. The Company does not anticipate any losses with respect to such cash balances.

        The use of the Company's cash flows for operations has primarily consisted of salaries and wages for its employees, facility and facility-related costs for its offices, laboratories and manufacturing facility, fees paid in connection with preclinical studies, clinical studies, contract manufacturing, laboratory supplies and services, consulting, legal and other professional fees. To date, the primary sources of cash flows from operations have been payments received from the Company's collaborative partners and from government entities. In general, the Company's sources of cash flows from operations for the foreseeable future will be upfront license payments, payments for the achievement of milestones, product royalty payments, payments under government contracts and grants and funded research and development under collaboration agreements that the Company may receive. The timing of any new collaboration agreements, government contracts or grants and any payments under these agreements, contracts or grants cannot be easily predicted and may vary significantly from quarter to quarter.

Cash Provided By or Used in Operating Activities

        Net cash provided by operating activities was $18,280,766 for the year ended December 31, 2008 compared to cash used of $9,125,400 for the year ended December 31, 2007. The increase in net cash provided by operating activities was primarily attributed to Pfizer's one-time upfront payment to the Company of $40 million, PRF's one-time milestone payment of $10 million, a decrease in prepaid and other assets and an increase in accounts payable and accrued expenses, partially offset by increased net losses and an increase in accounts and other receivables. The Company expects that cash used in operations will increase in 2009 as the Company continues to develop its therapeutic product pipeline and bring forward new product candidates into clinical development.

        Celldex has incurred and will continue to incur significant costs in the area of research and development, including preclinical and clinical trials, as its product candidates are developed. Celldex plans to spend significant amounts to progress its current product candidates through the clinical trial and commercialization process as well as to develop additional product candidates. As its product candidates progress through the clinical trial process, Celldex may be obligated to make significant milestone payments. Celldex also expects to incur future facility costs as a result of continued capital expansion, renovations and replacements. Celldex expect its general and administrative costs to increase as it expands its administrative and business development activities. Furthermore, Celldex expects

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investment income to decrease as its funds future operations and capital expenditures from its cash reserves.

Cash Provided By or Used In Investing Activities

        Cash provided by investing activities was $10,155,188 for the year ended December 31, 2008 compared to cash used in investing activities of $413,435 during 2007. The change in amounts between years primarily reflects the impact of the Merger and the result of increased expenditures on capital equipment in 2008, primarily for the conversion of the Company's Fall River facility into a cell culture manufacturing facility. The Company's investment in capital equipment is discretionary and it expects to spend less on capital expenditures in 2009.

Cash Provided by Financing Activities

        Net cash provided by financing activities was $10,925,112 for the year ended December 31, 2008 compared to $264,339 for the year ended December 31, 2007. The increase in net cash provided by financing activities was primarily due to Pfizer's one-time $10 million equity investment in the Company and increases in the related party loan due to Medarex, offset in part by principal payments of long-term liabilities.

Other Liquidity Matters

        On April 16, 2008, the Company and Pfizer entered into an agreement under which Pfizer was granted an exclusive worldwide license to a therapeutic cancer vaccine candidate, CDX-110, in Phase 2 development for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme. The agreement also gives Pfizer exclusive rights to the use of EGFRvIII vaccines in other potential indications. Under the licensing and development agreement, Pfizer made an upfront payment to the Company of $40 million and made a $10 million equity investment in the Company. Pfizer will fund all development costs for these programs. The Company is also eligible to receive potential milestone payments exceeding $390 million for the successful development and commercialization of CDX-110 and additional EGFRvIII vaccine products, as well as royalties on any product sales. The Pfizer Agreement became effective after clearance under the Hart-Scott-Rodino Antitrust Improvements Act of 1976 (as amended) in May 2008.

        On April 3, 2008, Rotarix® received FDA market approval for the prevention of rotavirus gastroenteritis in infants which triggered a $1.5 million milestone payment to the Company from Glaxo, $750,000 of which the Company has retained under its agreement with PRF. Rotarix® is now licensed in over 100 countries worldwide including the U.S. and the European Union. Glaxo's U.S. market launch of Rotarix® during the third quarter of 2008 resulted in a $10 million milestone payment from PRF, which the Company received in October 2008.

        In 2009, the Company may take steps to raise additional capital including, but not limited to, the licensing of technology programs with existing or new collaborative partners, possible business combinations, or the issuance of common stock via private placements or public offerings. We believe that our current cash and cash equivalents are sufficient to fund planned operations for at least the next twelve months. While we may continue to seek capital through a number of means, there can be no assurance that additional financing will be available on acceptable terms, if at all, particularly in light of the recent disruptions in the financial markets and the Company's negotiating position in capital-raising efforts may worsen as existing resources are used. There is also no assurance that the Company will be able to enter into further collaborative relationships. Additional equity financing may be dilutive to the Company's stockholders; debt financing, if available, may involve significant cash payment obligations and covenants that restrict the Company's ability to operate as a business; and licensing or strategic collaborations may result in royalties or other terms which reduce the Company's economic potential from products under development. If the Company is unable to raise the necessary

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funds, it may have to delay or discontinue the development of programs, license out programs earlier than expected, raise funds at significant discount or on other unfavorable terms, if at all, or evaluate a sale of all or part of the Company.

SUBSEQUENT EVENTS

        In January 2009, the Company entered into two transactions involving the sale of its poultry vaccines business and the out-licensing of its cholera and ETEC programs as more fully described below.

        On January 13, 2009, the Company entered into a purchase agreement to sell its poultry vaccines business to LAHI. Since 2002, LAHI has performed all manufacturing, marketing and distribution activities for Celldex's marketed Megan®Vac 1 and Megan®Egg poultry vaccines and has paid Celldex product royalties. Financial terms of the transaction with LAHI included an upfront fee and potential milestone payments.

        On January 20, 2009, the Company entered into an Exclusive License and Development Agreement with VTI. Under the license agreement, Celldex has granted a worldwide fee- and royalty-bearing exclusive license to VTI to development and commercialize Celldex's CholeraGarde® and ETEC vaccine programs. Financial terms of the agreement with VTI include an upfront license fee, milestone payments and royalties on net sales of licensed products during the term of the agreement.

AGGREGATE CONTRACTUAL OBLIGATIONS

        The following table summarizes Celldex's contractual obligations at December 31, 2008 and the effect such obligations and commercial commitments are expected to have on its liquidity and cash flow in future years. These obligations, commitments and supporting arrangements represent payments based on current operating forecasts, which are subject to change:

 
  Total   2009   2010 - 2012   2013 - 2014   Thereafter  

Contractual obligations:

                               

Operating lease obligations

  $ 19,989,900   $ 2,475,600   $ 7,374,200   $ 4,881,300   $ 5,258,800  

Loan Payable*

    1,189,800     130,400     363,700     695,700        

Note Payable*

    401,700     177,200     224,500          

Licensing obligations

    3,630,000     510,000     1,755,000     830,000     535,000  

Severance obligations

    33,800     25,300     8,500          
                       
 

Total contractual obligations

  $ 25,245,200   $ 3,318,500   $ 9,725,900   $ 6,407,000   $ 5,793,800  
                       

Commercial commitments:

                               

Clinical development

  $ 5,502,600   $ 5,472,100   $ 30,500   $   $  

Manufacturing development

    30,000     30,000                    
 

Total commercial commitments

  $ 5,532,600   $ 5,502,100   $ 30,500   $   $  

*
includes interest obligations

        In the future, we may owe royalties and other contingent payments to our licensors based on the achievement of developmental milestones, product sales and specified other objectives. These potential future obligations are not included in the above table.

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RECENT ACCOUNTING PRONOUNCEMENTS

        SFAS 141(R) and SFAS 160:    In December 2007, the Financial Accounting Standards Board ("FASB") issued SFAS No. 141(R), Business Combinations, ("SFAS No. 141(R)"), and SFAS No. 160, Noncontrolling Interests in Consolidated Financial Statements, an amendment of ARB No. 51, ("SFAS No. 160"), which introduce significant changes in the accounting for and reporting of business acquisitions and noncontrolling interests in a subsidiary. SFAS No. 141(R) is to be applied prospectively to business combinations for which the acquisition date is on or after the beginning of the first annual reporting period beginning on or after December 15, 2008. SFAS No. 160 is effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those fiscal years, beginning on or after December 15, 2008. Earlier adoption of both statements is prohibited. The adoption of SFAS No. 141(R) and SFAS No. 160 will only have an impact on the Company's financial statements if it is involved in a business combination that occurs after January 1, 2009.

        EITF 07-1:    In December 2007, the EITF reached a consensus on Issue No. 07-1, Accounting for Collaborative Arrangements ("EITF 07-1"). The EITF concluded on the definition of a collaborative arrangement and that revenues and costs incurred with third parties in connection with collaborative arrangements would be presented gross or net based on the criteria in EITF 99-19, Reporting Revenue Gross as a Principal versus Net as an Agent, and other accounting literature. Based on the nature of the arrangement, payments to or from collaborators would be evaluated and its terms, the nature of the entity's business, and whether those payments are within the scope of other accounting literature would be presented. Companies are also required to disclose the nature and purpose of collaborative arrangements along with the accounting policies and the classification and amounts of significant financial statement amounts related to the arrangements. Activities in the arrangement conducted in a separate legal entity should be accounted for under other accounting literature; however, required disclosure under EITF 07-1 applies to the entire collaborative agreement. EITF 07-1 is effective for financial statements issued for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2008, and interim periods within those fiscal years, and is to be applied retrospectively to all periods presented for all collaborative arrangements existing as of the effective date. The Company is currently evaluating the effect that the adoption of EITF 07-01 will have on its results of operations and financial condition.

        FSP No. FAS 142-3:    In April 2008, the FASB staff issued FASB Staff Position ("FSP") No. FAS 142-3, Determination of the Useful Life of Intangible Assets ("FSP No. FAS 142-3"). FSP No. FAS 142-3 amends the factors that should be considered in developing renewal or extension assumptions used to determine the useful life of a recognized intangible asset under FASB No. 142. The intent of this FSP is to improve the consistency between the useful life of a recognized intangible under Statement 142 and the period of expected cash flows used to measure fair value of the asset under FASB No. 141 and other accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America ("U.S.GAAP"). The FSP is effective for financial statements issued for fiscal years beginning after December 31, 2008, and interim periods within those fiscal years. Early adoption is prohibited. The adoption of FSP No. FAS 142-3 is not expected to have a material impact on Celldex's financial position and results of operations.

        SFAS 162:    In May 2008, FASB issued SFAS No. 162, "The Hierarchy of Generally Accepted Accounting Principles", or SFAS 162. SFAS 162 identifies the sources of accounting principles and the framework for selecting the principles to be used in the preparation of financial statements that are presented in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles in the United States. SFAS 162 is effective 60 days following the SEC's approval of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board amendments to AU Section 411, "The Meaning of Present Fairly in Conformity with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles." The Company does not expect SFAS 162 to have a material impact on its results of operations and financial condition.

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        EITF 03-6-1:    In June 2008, FASB issued FASB Staff Position No. EITF 03-6-1, "Determining Whether Instruments Granted in Share-Based Payment Transactions Are Participating Securities", or FSP EITF 03-6-1. FSP EITF 03-6-1 addresses whether instruments granted in share-based payment transactions are participating securities prior to vesting and, therefore, need to be included in the earnings allocation in computing earnings per share (EPS) under the two-class method described in paragraphs 60 and 61 of FASB Statement No. 128, "Earnings per Share", or SFAS 128. The guidance applies to the calculation of EPS under SFAS 128 for share-based payment awards with rights to dividends or dividend equivalents. FSP EITF 03-6-1 clarifies that unvested share-based payment awards that contain nonforfeitable rights to dividends or dividend equivalents (whether paid or unpaid) are participating securities and shall be included in the computation of EPS pursuant to the two class method. FSP EITF 03-6-1 is effective for financial statements issued for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2008, and interim periods within those years. All prior-period EPS data presented shall be adjusted retrospectively (including interim financial statements, summaries of earnings and selected financial data) to conform with the provisions of this FSP. Early adoption is not permitted. The Company does not expect the adoption of FSP EITF 03-6-1 will have a material impact on its results of operations and financial condition.

OFF-BALANCE SHEET ARRANGEMENTS.

        None.

Item 7A.    QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

        We own financial instruments that are sensitive to market risk as part of our investment portfolio. Our investment portfolio is used to preserve our capital until it is used to fund operations, including our research and development activities. None of these market-risk sensitive instruments are held for trading purposes. We invest our cash primarily in money market mutual funds. These investments are evaluated quarterly to determine the fair value of the portfolio. Our investment portfolio includes only marketable securities with active secondary or resale markets to help insure liquidity. We have implemented investment policies regarding the amount and credit ratings of investments. Because of the short-term nature of these investments, we do not believe we have material exposure due to market risk. The impact to our financial position and results of operations from likely changes in interest rates is not material.

        We do not utilize derivative financial instruments. See Note 1 to the Consolidated Financials Statements for a description of our use of other financial instruments. The carrying amounts reflected in the consolidated balance sheet of cash and cash equivalents, accounts receivables and accounts payable approximates fair value at December 31, 2008 due to the short-term maturities of these instruments.

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Item 8.    FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA

 
  Page

Reports of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firms

  65
 

Consolidated Balance Sheets at December 31, 2008 and December 31, 2007

  68
 

Consolidated Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Loss for the Years Ended December 31, 2008, December 31, 2007 and December 31, 2006

  69
 

Consolidated Statements of Stockholders' Equity (Deficit) for the Years Ended December 31, 2008, December 31, 2007 and December 31, 2006

  70
 

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the Years Ended December 31, 2008, December 31, 2007 and December 31, 2006

  71

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

  72

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REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

To The Board of Directors and Stockholders of
Celldex Therapeutics, Inc.

        In our opinion, the accompanying consolidated balance sheet and the related consolidated statements of operations and comprehensive loss, of stockholders' equity (deficit) and of cash flows, present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of Celldex Therapeutics, Inc. (formerly known as AVANT Immunotherapeutics, Inc.) and its subsidiaries at December 31, 2008, and the results of their operations and their cash flows for the year then ended in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. Also in our opinion, the Company did not maintain, in all material respects, effective internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2008, based on criteria established in Internal Control—Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO) because a material weakness in internal control over financial reporting existed related to the complement of the Company's accounting staff existing as of that date. A material weakness is a deficiency, or a combination of deficiencies, in internal control over financial reporting, such that there is a reasonable possibility that a material misstatement of the annual or interim financial statements will not be prevented or detected on a timely basis. The material weakness referred to above is described in Management's Annual Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting appearing under Item 9A. We considered this material weakness in determining the nature, timing, and extent of audit tests applied in our audit of the December 31, 2008 consolidated financial statements, and our opinion regarding the effectiveness of the Company's internal control over financial reporting does not affect our opinion on those consolidated financial statements. The Company's management is responsible for these financial statements, for maintaining effective internal control over financial reporting and for its assessment of the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting included in management's report referred to above. Our responsibility is to express opinions on these financial statements and on the Company's internal control over financial reporting based on our integrated audit. We conducted our audit in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement and whether effective internal control over financial reporting was maintained in all material respects. Our audit of the financial statements included examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements, assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, and evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. Our audit of internal control over financial reporting included obtaining an understanding of internal control over financial reporting, assessing the risk that a material weakness exists, and testing and evaluating the design and operating effectiveness of internal control based on the assessed risk. Our audit also included performing such other procedures as we considered necessary in the circumstances. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinions.

        A company's internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. A company's internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that (i) pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the company; (ii) provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and that receipts and expenditures of the company are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and directors of the company; and (iii) provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use, or disposition of the company's assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.

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        Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.

/s/ PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP

Boston, Massachusetts
March 2, 2009

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REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

The Board of Directors and Stockholders
Celldex Therapeutics, Inc.

        We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheet of Celldex Research Corp. (formerly known as Celldex Therapeutics, Inc.) and subsidiary as of December 31, 2007, and the related consolidated statements of operations and comprehensive loss, stockholders' equity (deficit) and cash flows for each of the two years in the period ended December 31, 2007. These financial statements are the responsibility of the Company's management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audits.

        We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. We were not engaged to perform an audit of the Company's internal control over financial reporting. Our audit included consideration of internal control over financial reporting as a basis for designing audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purposes of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company's internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements, assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, and evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

        In our opinion, the financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the consolidated financial position of Celldex Research Corp. (formerly known as Celldex Therapeutics, Inc.) at December 31, 2007 and the results of its operations and its cash flows for each of the two years in the period ended December 31, 2007, in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles.

/s/ Ernst & Young LLP              

MetroPark, New Jersey
May 7, 2008

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CELLDEX THERAPEUTICS, INC.

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

 
  December 31, 2008   December 31, 2007  

ASSETS

             

Current Assets:

             
 

Cash and Cash Equivalents

  $ 44,257,286   $ 4,909,530  
 

Accounts and Other Receivables

    1,826,685     132,496  
 

Prepaid and Other Current Assets

    992,473     656,347  
           
   

Total Current Assets

    47,076,444     5,698,373  
           

Property and Equipment, Net

   
13,567,180
   
1,918,036
 

Intangible Assets, Net

    2,472,440     1,032,903  

Other Assets

    6,677,171     725,193  
           
   

Total Assets

  $ 69,793,235   $ 9,374,505  
           

LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS' EQUITY (DEFICIT)

             

Current Liabilities:

             
 

Accounts Payable

  $ 2,153,393   $ 749,867  
 

Accrued Expenses

    3,841,159     2,519,419  
 

Payable Due Medarex

    2,957,248     5,835,552  
 

Current Portion of Deferred Revenue

    4,931,327     974,156  
 

Current Portion of Long-Term Liabilities

    218,459     57,447  
           
   

Total Current Liabilities

    14,101,586     10,136,441  
           

Deferred Revenue

   
36,488,713
   
219,754
 
           

Other Long-Term Liabilities

    1,069,257     150,207  
           

Commitments and Contingent Liabilities (Note 15)

             

Stockholders' Equity (Deficit):

             
 

Convertible Preferred Stock, 3,000,000 Shares Authorized; None Issued and Outstanding at December 31, 2008

           
 

Convertible Preferred Stock, $1.00 Par Value; 1,000,000 Shares Authorized; None Issued and Outstanding at December 31, 2007

           
 

Common Stock, $.001 Par Value; 300,000,000 Shares Authorized; 15,789,756 Issued and Outstanding at December 31, 2008

    15,790        
 

Class A Common Stock, $.01 Par Value; 6,800,000 Shares Authorized, Issued and Outstanding at December 31, 2007 (2,811,147 shares issued and outstanding after adjustments to reflect the Merger and a reverse stock split of 1-for-12 effective March 7, 2008)

          2,811  
 

Common Stock, $.01 Par Value; 50,000,000 Shares Authorized; 13,300,000 Issued and Outstanding at December 31, 2007(5,498,273 shares issued and outstanding after adjustments to reflect the Merger and a reverse stock split of 1-for-12 effective March 7, 2008)

          5,498  
 

Additional Paid-In Capital

    136,661,181     69,889,205  
 

Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income

    2,605,726     2,619,036  
 

Accumulated Deficit

    (121,149,018 )   (73,648,447 )
           
   

Total Stockholders' Equity (Deficit)

    18,133,679     (1,131,897 )
           
   

Total Liabilities and Stockholders' Equity (Deficit)

  $ 69,793,235   $ 9,374,505  
           

The accompanying notes are an integral part of the consolidated financial statements.

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CELLDEX THERAPEUTICS, INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS AND COMPREHENSIVE LOSS

 
  Year Ended
December 31,
2008
  Year Ended
December 31,
2007
  Year Ended
December 31,
2006
 

REVENUE:

                   

Product Development and Licensing Agreements

  $ 3,715,957   $ 466,156   $ 466,156  

Contracts and Grants

    533,182     939,436     433,028  

Product Royalties

    3,206,368          
               
 

Total Revenue

    7,455,507     1,405,592     899,184  
               

OPERATING EXPENSE:

                   

Research and Development

    26,347,189     9,891,709     10,012,803  

General and Administrative

    14,747,392     6,905,487     8,395,701  

Charge for In-Process Research and Development

    14,755,908          

U.K Facility Exit Costs

            1,168,696  

Amortization of Acquired Intangible Assets

    361,006     116,932     116,932  
               
 

Total Operating Expense

    56,211,495     16,914,128     19,694,132  
               

Operating Loss

    (48,755,988 )   (15,508,536 )   (18,794,948 )

Investment and Other Income, Net

   
1,255,417
   
435,486
   
959,686
 
               

Net Loss

 
$

(47,500,571

)

$

(15,073,050

)

$

(17,835,262

)
               

Basic and Diluted Net Loss Per Common Share (See Note 1)

 
$

(3.34

)

$

(1.81

)

$

(2.15

)
               

Shares Used in Calculating Basic and Diluted Net Loss per Share (See Note 1)

    14,217,388     8,309,420     8,278,500  
               

COMPREHENSIVE LOSS:

                   

Net Loss

  $ (47,500,571 ) $ (15,073,050 ) $ (17,835,262 )

Unrealized Gain/(Loss) on Foreign Exchange Translation

    (13,310 )   230,840     2,882,403  
               

Comprehensive Loss

 
$

(47,513,881

)

$

(14,842,210

)

$

(14,952,859

)
               

The accompanying notes are an integral part of the consolidated financial statements.

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CELLDEX THERAPEUTICS, INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF STOCKHOLDERS' EQUITY (DEFICIT)

FOR THE YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2008, 2007 AND 2006

 
  Common
Stock
Shares(1)
  Common
Stock Par
Value(1)
  Class A
Common
Stock
Shares(1)
  Class A
Common
Stock Par
Value(1)
  Additional
Paid-In
Capital
  Accumulated
Other
Comprehensive
Income
  Accumulated
Deficit
  Total
Stockholders'
Equity
(Deficit)
 

Balance at December 31, 2005

    5,456,933   $ 5,457     2,811,147   $ 2,811   $ 69,232,776   $ (494,207 ) $ (40,740,135 ) $ 28,006,702  

Share-Based Compensation

                    1,760,165             1,760,165  

Shares Issued to Duke University in Connection with Licensing Agreement

    41,340     41             329,959             330,000  

Comprehensive Income (Loss):

                                                 
 

Net Loss

                            (17,835,262 )   (17,835,262  
 

Other Comprehensive Income

                        2,882,403         2,882,403  
                                                 

Total Comprehensive Loss

                                              (14,952,859 )
                                   

Balance at December 31, 2006

    5,498,273   $ 5,498     2,811,147   $ 2,811   $ 71,322,900   $ 2,388,196   $ (58,575,397 ) $ 15,144,008  

Share-Based Compensation

                    1,604,922             1,604,922  

Medarex Return of Capital

                    (3,038,617 )           (3,038,617 )

Comprehensive Income (Loss):

                                                 
 

Net Loss

                            (15,073,050 )   (15,073,050  
 

Other Comprehensive Income

                        230,840         230,840  
                                                 

Total Comprehensive Loss

                                              (14,842,210 )
                                   

Balance at December 31, 2007

    5,498,273   $ 5,498     2,811,147   $ 2,811   $ 69,889,205   $ 2,619,036   $ (73,648,447 ) $ (1,131,897 )

Exchange of Class A for Common Stock

    2,811,147     2,811     (2,811,147 )   (2,811 )                

Shares Issued to Medarex in Settlement of a Payable

    351,692     352             3,038,265             3,038,617  

Shares Received in Exchange in the Merger

    6,265,889     6,266             46,869,106             46,875,372  

Cash Paid for Fractional Shares in Connection with the Merger

    (7 )                            

Shares Issued to Pfizer in connection with the CDX-110 Licensing Agreement

    781,250     781                 10,866,407                 10,867,188  

Shares Issued to Duke University in Settlement of a Payable

    81,512     82                 1,182,505                 1,182,587  

Share-Based Compensation

                    4,815,693             4,815,693  

Comprehensive Loss:

                                                 
 

Net Loss

                            (47,500,571 )   (47,500,571 )
 

Other Comprehensive Loss

                        (13,310 )       (13,310 )
                                                 

Total Comprehensive Loss

                                              (47,513,881 )
                                   

Balance at December 31, 2008

    15,789,756   $ 15,790       $   $ 136,661,181   $ 2,605,726   $ (121,149,018 ) $ 18,133,679  
                                   

(1)  Adjusted to reflect the Merger exchange ratio and a reverse stock split of 1-for-12 effective March 7, 2008.

The accompanying notes are an integral part of the consolidated financial statements.

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CELLDEX THERAPEUTICS, INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

 
  Year Ended
December 31,
2008
  Year Ended
December 31,
2007
  Year Ended
December 31,
2006
 

Cash Flows From Operating Activities:

                   
 

Net Loss

  $ (47,500,571 ) $ (15,073,050 ) $ (17,835,816 )
 

Adjustments to Reconcile Net Loss to Cash Provided by (Used in) Operating Activities:

                   
   

Depreciation and Amortization

    2,176,427     710,156     769,520  
   

Amortization of Intangible Assets

    361,006     116,932     116,932  
   

Impairment of Investment in Select Vaccines Limited

    297,146          
   

Loss (Gain) on Impairment and Disposal of Assets

    33,795         (136,161 )
   

U.K. Facilities Exit Costs

            1,101,603  
   

Non-Cash License Fees Paid with Stock

            330,000  
   

In-Process Research and Development

    14,755,908          
   

Stock-Based Compensation Expense

    4,815,693     1,604,924     1,760,165  
 

Changes in Assets and Liabilities

                   
   

Accounts and Other Receivables

    (1,655,600 )   4,167,335     940,000  
   

Prepaid and Other Current Assets

    9,979,807     (587,077 )   794,000  
   

Other Assets—Deferred Costs

    (6,413,770 )        
   

Accounts Payable and Accrued Expenses

    1,221,278     28,116     (1,300,000 )
   

Deferred Revenue

    40,116,130     42,304     (466,157 )
   

Other Long-Term Liabilities—Deferred Rent

    93,517     (78,808 )   286,462  
               

Net Cash Provided by (Used in) Operating Activities

    18,280,766     (9,125,400 )   (13,639,452 )
               

Cash Flows From Investing Activities:

                   
 

Cash Acquired in the Acquisition of AVANT, Net of Transaction Costs

    10,750,255          
 

Other Non Current Assets

        (335,054 )    
 

Restricted Cash Deposits

    (1,737 )   (3,070 )   168,000  
 

Acquisition of Property and Equipment

    (1,304,706 )   (75,311 )   (2,478,719 )
 

Proceeds from Disposal or Sale of Assets

    460,494         144,000  
 

Proceeds from Sale of Shares of Select Vaccines Limited

    250,882          
               

Net Cash Provided by (Used in) Investing Activities

    10,155,188     (413,435 )   (2,166,719 )
               

Cash Flows From Financing Activities:

                   
 

Net Proceeds from Stock Issuance

    10,867,188          
 

Related Party Loan Due to Medarex

    160,313     264,339     2,077,573  
 

Payment of Loans and Note Payable

    (102,389 )        
               

Net Cash Provided by Financing Activities

    10,925,112     264,339     2,077,573  
               

Effect of Exchange Rate Changes on Cash and Cash Equivalents

   
(13,310

)
 
183,840
   
2,516,000
 
               

Net Increase (Decrease) in Cash and Cash Equivalents

    39,347,756     (9,090,656 )   (11,212,598 )

Cash and Cash Equivalents at Beginning of Period

    4,909,530     14,000,186     25,212,784  
               

Cash and Cash Equivalents at End of Period

  $ 44,257,286   $ 4,909,530   $ 14,000,186  
               

Supplemental Disclosure of Non-Cash Flow Information

                   
 

Shares Received in Exchange in the Merger

  $ 46,251,952   $   $  
 

Shares Issued to Medarex in Settlement of a Payable

  $ 3,038,617       $  
 

Shares Issued to Duke University in Settlement of a Payable

  $ 1,182,587   $   $  

Supplemental Disclosure of Cash Flow Information

                   
 

Cash Paid for Interest

  $ 142,210   $   $  

The accompanying notes are an integral part of the consolidated financial statements.

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CELLDEX THERAPEUTICS, INC.

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2008, 2007 and 2006

(1) SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

        Celldex Therapeutics, Inc. (formerly known as AVANT Immunotherapeutics, Inc.) (the "Company" or "Celldex") is engaged in the discovery, development and commercialization of products that harness the human immune system to prevent and treat disease. The Company is developing a portfolio of vaccines and targeted immunotherapeutics addressing a wide range of applications including oncology, infectious and inflammatory diseases. The portfolio includes a pipeline of therapeutic cancer vaccines, monoclonal antibodies, single-dose, oral vaccines aimed at protecting travelers and people in regions where infectious diseases are endemic and a treatment to reduce complement-mediated tissue damage. The Company is advancing a pipeline of clinical and preclinical product candidates, the most advanced of which are for treatment of various cancers. The Company's lead programs are therapeutic cancer vaccines designed to instruct the patient's immune system to recognize and destroy cancer cells. The Company further leverages the value of its technology portfolio through corporate, governmental and non-governmental partnerships. One successful collaboration resulted in our license of a rotavirus strain to GlaxoSmithKline that was used in the development of an oral human rotavirus vaccine. Current collaborations encompass the development of vaccines addressed to cancer therapies, global health, human food safety and animal health. The Company's product candidates address large market opportunities for which the Company believes current therapies are inadequate or non-existent.

        Merger between AVANT and Celldex:    On March 7, 2008, Celldex (formerly known as AVANT Immunotherapeutics, Inc.) completed the merger of Callisto Merger Corporation ("Merger Sub"), a wholly owned subsidiary of Celldex, with and into Celldex Research Corporation (formerly known as Celldex Therapeutics, Inc.) ("Celldex Research"), a privately-held company, (the "Merger"). Effective October 1, 2008, the Company changed its name from AVANT Immunotherapeutics, Inc. to Celldex Therapeutics, Inc.

        At the special meeting of the Company's shareholders held on March 6, 2008 in connection with the Merger, stockholders approved four proposals: (i) the issuance of shares of the Company's common stock pursuant to the Merger Agreement in the amount necessary to result in the former Celldex Research stockholders owning 58% of the Company's common stock on a fully diluted basis, (ii) an amendment to the Company's Third Restated Certificate of Incorporation to increase the number of authorized shares to 300,000,000, (iii) an amendment to the Company's Third Restated Certificate of Incorporation to effect a reverse stock split in a ratio ranging from one-for-twelve to one-for-twenty of all the issued and outstanding shares of the Company's common stock, the final ratio to be determined by the Company's board of directors and (iv) adoption of the 2008 Stock Option and Incentive Plan.

        Also, pursuant to the terms of the Merger Agreement, former Celldex Research shareholders received 4.96 shares of the Company's common stock in exchange for each share of Celldex Research common stock and Class A common stock they owned at the effective time of the Merger, plus cash in lieu of fractional shares. The Company also assumed all of Celldex Research's stock options outstanding at the effective time of the Merger.

        The Company's board of directors approved a 1-for-12 reverse stock split of the Company's common stock, which became effective on March 7, 2008. As a result of the reverse stock split, each twelve shares of common stock were combined and reclassified into one share of common stock and the total number of shares outstanding was reduced from approximately 180 million shares (including

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CELLDEX THERAPEUTICS, INC.

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2008, 2007 and 2006

(1) SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (Continued)


the shares issued to former Celldex Research stockholders in the Merger) to approximately 15 million shares.

        The Merger was accounted for using the purchase method of accounting and was treated as an acquisition by Celldex Research of Celldex (then AVANT), with Celldex Research being considered the accounting acquirer based on the application of criteria specified in Statement of Financial Accounting Standards ("SFAS") No. 141, Business Combination, ("SFAS 141"), even though Celldex (then AVANT) was the issuer of common stock and the surviving legal entity in the transaction. Under the purchase method of accounting, the deemed purchase price was allocated to AVANT's underlying tangible and identifiable intangible assets acquired and liabilities assumed based upon the respective fair value of each with any excess deemed purchase price allocated to goodwill. The valuation analysis conducted by the Company determined that the fair value of assets acquired and the fair value of liabilities assumed by Celldex Research exceeded the purchase price for AVANT, resulting in negative goodwill of approximately $6.0 million. In accordance with SFAS 141, the negative goodwill has been allocated to all of the acquired assets that were non-financial and non-current assets, including property and equipment, identifiable intangible assets, and in-process research and development. See Note 17 to the Company's consolidated financial statements for additional information.

        Because Celldex Research was determined to be the acquirer for accounting purposes, the historical financial statements of Celldex Research became the historical financial statements of the Company as of the closing of the Merger. Accordingly, the financial statements of the Company prior to the Merger reflect the financial position, results of operations and cash flows of Celldex Research, which during the historical periods presented in the accompanying consolidated financial statements, was then majority-owned by Medarex, Inc. ("Medarex"). Following the Merger, the financial statements of the current period reflect the financial position, results of operation and cash flows of the Company. The results of operations of AVANT are included in the results of operations of the Company beginning March 8, 2008. Accordingly, except as otherwise discussed below, this report reflects the financial condition, results of operations and liquidity of the combined companies at December 31, 2008 and historically of Celldex Research on a stand-alone basis for all periods prior to March 8, 2008.

        The Company's cash and cash equivalents at December 31, 2008 were $44,257,286. Its working capital at December 31, 2008 was $32,974,858. The Company incurred a loss of $47,500,571 for the year ended December 31, 2008. Net cash provided by operations for the year ended December 31, 2008 was $18,280,766. The Company believes that cash inflows from existing grants and collaborations, interest income on invested funds and its current cash and cash equivalents will be sufficient to meet estimated working capital requirements and fund operations beyond December 31, 2009. The working capital requirements of the Company are dependent on several factors including, but not limited to, the costs associated with research and development programs, pre-clinical and clinical studies, manufacture of clinical materials and the scope of collaborative arrangements.

        During 2009, Celldex may take steps to raise additional capital including, but not limited to, the licensing of technology programs with existing or new collaborative partners, possible business combinations, or the issuance of common stock via private placements or public offerings. The Company believes that its current cash and cash equivalents are sufficient to fund planned operations for at least the next twelve months. While the Company continues to seek capital through a number of means, there can be no assurance that additional financing will be available on acceptable terms, if at

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CELLDEX THERAPEUTICS, INC.

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2008, 2007 and 2006

(1) SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (Continued)


all, particularly in light of the recent disruptions in the financial markets and the Company's negotiating position in capital-raising efforts may worsen as existing resources are used. There is also no assurance that the Company will be able to enter into further collaborative relationships. Additional equity financing may be dilutive to the Company's stockholders; debt financing, if available, may involve significant cash payment obligations and covenants that restrict the Company's ability to operate as a business; and licensing or strategic collaborations may result in royalties or other terms that reduce the Company's economic potential from products under development. If the Company is unable to raise the necessary funds, it may have to delay or discontinue the development of programs, license out programs earlier than expected, raise funds at significant discount or on other unfavorable terms, if at all, or evaluate a sale of all or a part of the Company.

        On April 16, 2008, the Company and Pfizer Inc. ("Pfizer") entered into a License and Development Agreement (the "Pfizer Agreement") under which Pfizer will be granted an exclusive worldwide license to a therapeutic cancer vaccine candidate, CDX-110, in Phase 2 development for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme ("GBM"). The Pfizer Agreement also gives Pfizer exclusive rights to the use of EGFRvIII vaccines in other potential indications. Under the Pfizer Agreement, Pfizer made an upfront payment to the Company of $40 million and made a $10 million equity investment in the Company. Pfizer will fund all development costs for these programs. The Company is also eligible to receive potential milestone payments exceeding $390 million for the successful development and commercialization of CDX-110 and additional EGFRvIII vaccine products, as well as royalties on any product sales.

        On April 3, 2008, Rotarix® received Food and Drug Administration ("FDA") market approval for the prevention of rotavirus gastroenteritis in infants. FDA approval triggered a $1.5 million milestone payment to the Company from GlaxoSmithKline plc ("Glaxo"), $750,000 of which the Company has retained under the Company's agreement with Paul Royalty Fund ("PRF"). Rotarix® is now licensed in over 100 countries worldwide including the U.S. and the European Union. Glaxo initiated its U.S. launch of Rotarix® during the third quarter of 2008 which resulted in the Company receiving a $10 million milestone payment from PRF in October 2008.

        The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of Celldex Therapeutics, Inc. and its direct and indirect wholly-owned subsidiaries: Celldex Research, Celldex Therapeutics, Ltd. ("Celldex Ltd.") and Megan Health, Inc. ("Megan"). All intercompany transactions have been eliminated.

        Cash and cash equivalents consist of cash and short-term investments with original maturities of three months or less. Cash and cash equivalents are stated at cost, which approximates fair value. At December 31, 2008, investments were primarily in money market mutual funds.

        Celldex may invest its cash in debt instruments of financial institutions, government entities and corporations, and mutual funds. The Company has established guidelines relative to credit ratings, diversification and maturities to mitigate risk and maintain liquidity. Financial instruments, which potentially subject the Company to concentrations of credit risk, consist principally of cash and cash

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CELLDEX THERAPEUTICS, INC.

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2008, 2007 and 2006

(1) SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (Continued)


equivalents and accounts receivable. Cash and cash equivalents consist of cash and money market funds which are all held with three financial institutions in the U.S. and one financial institution in the United Kingdom.

        In August 2008, the Company sold its equity investment in Select Vaccines Limited ("Select Vaccines") shares for net proceeds of $250,882 and recorded a loss of $297,129. The Company had classified its equity investment in Select Vaccines shares as available-for-sale securities under SFAS 115, Accounting for Certain Investments in Debt and Equity Securities, ("FAS 115").

        Restricted cash of $182,130 and $180,139 at December 31, 2008 and December 31, 2007, respectively, represents security deposits for the Company's facilities in Phillipsburg, New Jersey, of which the Company took occupancy in 2006.

        The Company enters into various types of financial instruments in the normal course of business. The carrying amounts of the Company's cash and cash equivalents, accounts receivable, accounts payable and accrued expenses approximate their fair values due to the short-term nature of these financial instruments. Receivables are concentrated in the pharmaceutical industry and from United Kingdom Inland Revenue. Management considers the likelihood of market credit risk to be remote.

        Trade accounts receivable are recorded at the invoiced amount and do not bear interest. The Company has not historically experienced credit losses from its accounts receivable and therefore has not established an allowance for doubtful accounts. The Company does not have any off-balance-sheet credit exposure related to its customers.

        Accounts and other receivables consist of the following:

 
  December 31, 2008   December 31, 2007  

Trade

  $ 1,690,029   $  

Other

    136,656     132,496  
           

  $ 1,826,685   $ 132,496  
           

        At December 31, 2008, trade receivables primarily consist of $1,431,382 due from Pfizer (see Note 10).

        Other receivables primarily consist of money market interest receivable, an employee loan receivable and research and development tax credit receivable from United Kingdom Inland Revenue.

        For the year ended December 31, 2008, revenue from Glaxo and Pfizer represented 50% and 38%, respectively, of total Company revenue. For the years ended December 31, 2007 and 2006, certain

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CELLDEX THERAPEUTICS, INC.

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2008, 2007 and 2006

(1) SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (Continued)


customers represented more than 10% of total Company revenue. This was due to low levels of revenue in such years, and these customers in future years are not expected to represent 10% or more of total Company revenue.

        In the ordinary course of its business, the Company incurs substantial costs to construct property and equipment. The treatment of costs to construct these assets depends on the nature of the costs and the stage of construction. Costs incurred in the project planning and design phase, and in the construction and installation phase, are capitalized as part of the cost of the asset. The Company stops capitalizing costs when the asset is substantially complete and ready for its intended use.

        For manufacturing property and equipment, the Company also capitalizes the cost of validating these assets for the underlying manufacturing process. Celldex completes the capitalization of validation costs when the asset is substantially complete and ready for its intended use. Costs capitalized include incremental labor and fringe benefits, and direct consultancy services.

        Property and equipment is stated at cost and depreciated over the estimated useful lives of the related assets using the straight-line method. Laboratory equipment and office furniture and equipment are depreciated over a five-year period and computer equipment is depreciated over a three-year period. Manufacturing equipment is amortized over a seven- to ten-year period. Leasehold improvements are amortized over the shorter of the estimated useful life or the non-cancelable term of the related lease, including any renewals that are reasonably assured of occurring. Property and equipment under construction is classified as construction in progress and is depreciated or amortized only after the asset is placed in service. Expenditures for maintenance and repairs are charged to expense whereas the costs of significant improvements which extend the life of the underlying asset are capitalized. Upon retirement or sale, the cost of assets disposed of and the related accumulated depreciation are eliminated and the related gains or losses are reflected in net income.

        The Company periodically evaluates its long-lived assets, primarily property and equipment and intangible assets for potential impairment under SFAS No. 144, Accounting for the Impairment of Long-Lived Assets, ("SFAS No. 144"). The Company performs these evaluations whenever events or changes in circumstances suggest that the carrying amount of an asset or group of assets is not recoverable. Indicators of potential impairment include:

        If the Company believes an indicator of potential impairment exists, the carrying values of the assets are evaluated in relation to the operating performance and future undiscounted cash flows of the underlying asset. The net book value of an asset is adjusted to fair value if its expected future

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CELLDEX THERAPEUTICS, INC.

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2008, 2007 and 2006

(1) SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (Continued)

undiscounted cash flows are less than its book value. The Company charges impairments of the long-lived assets to operations if its evaluations indicate that the carrying value of these assets is not recoverable. Management had identified no indicators of impairment at December 31, 2008. When we determine that the carrying value of intangible assets or long-lived assets is not recoverable, we may be required to record impairment charges for these assets that have not been previously recorded.

        Patent costs are expensed as incurred. Certain patent costs are reimbursed by the Company's product development and licensing partners. Any reimbursed patent costs are recorded as product development and licensing agreement revenues in the Company's financial statements.

        The Company capitalizes interest cost as part of the historical cost of acquiring certain assets during the period of time required to get the asset ready for its intended use. The amount of capitalized interest is limited to the amount of interest incurred by the Company and has not been significant to the Company's financial position or results of operations.

        The Company presently has three facilities that are located at Phillipsburg, New Jersey, and Needham and Fall River, Massachusetts, under non-cancellable operating lease agreements for office, laboratory and manufacturing space. The rent payments for the three locations escalate over the lease term. Rent expense is recorded on a straight-line basis over the terms of the leases, including any renewals that are reasonably assured of occurring. The difference between rent expense and amounts paid under the lease agreements is recorded as deferred rent liability in the accompanying consolidated balance sheets. Tenant improvements paid by the landlord are capitalized as leasehold improvements and amortized over the shorter of their estimated useful lives or the remaining lease term.

        The Company has acquired intangible assets, which include core technology, developed technology and a strategic partner agreement, through the Merger and the acquisition of Lorantis Limited ("Lorantis"). These acquired intangible assets are being amortized on a straight-line basis over their estimated lives, which range from 4.5 to 11 years. The determination of the amortization period involves estimates and judgments on management's part. Any significant changes in the Company's estimates or assumptions could impact the carrying value of acquired intangible assets. The Company evaluates the recoverability of these assets when facts and circumstances suggest the asset could be impaired in accordance with SFAS No. 144.

        The Company accounts for revenue arrangements that include multiple deliverables in accordance with Emerging Issues Task Force ("EITF") No. 00-21, Accounting for Revenue Arrangements with Multiple Deliverables ("EITF 00-21"). EITF 00-21 addresses how to determine whether an arrangement involving multiple deliverables contains more than one unit of accounting. In applying the guidance,

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CELLDEX THERAPEUTICS, INC.

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2008, 2007 and 2006

(1) SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (Continued)

revenue arrangements with multiple deliverables can only be considered as separate units of accounting if (i) the delivered item has value to the customer on a standalone basis, (ii) there is objective and reliable evidence of the fair value of the undelivered items and (iii) if the right of return exists, delivery of the undelivered items is considered probable and substantially in the control of the vendor. If these criteria are not met, the revenue elements must be considered a single unit of accounting for purposes of revenue recognition.

        Payments received to fund certain research activities are recognized as revenue in the period in which the research activities are performed. Payments received in advance that are related to future performance are deferred and recognized as revenue when the research projects are performed.

        The Company has entered into various license and development agreements with pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies. The terms of the agreements typically include non-refundable license fees, funding of research and development, payments based upon achievement of certain milestones and royalties on net product sales. Non-refundable license fees are recognized as contract and license fee revenue when the Company has a contractual right to receive such payments, provided that (i) a contractual arrangement exists, (ii) the contract price is fixed or determinable, (iii) the collection of the resulting receivable is reasonably assured and (iv) the Company has no further performance obligations under the license agreement. Upfront non-refundable fees associated with license and development agreements where the Company has continuing performance obligations under the terms of the agreement are recorded as deferred revenue and recognized as revenue over the estimated service period as the Company completes its obligations. Where the Company's level of effort is relatively constant over the performance period or no other pattern is estimable, the revenue is recognized on a straight-line basis. Revenue is limited to the lesser of the cumulative amount of payments received or the cumulative amount of revenue earned, as determined using the straight-line basis, as of the period ending date. If the estimated service period is subsequently modified, the period over which the upfront fee is recognized is modified accordingly on a prospective basis. The determination of the performance period involves judgment on management's part. Funding of research and development is recognized as revenue over the term of the applicable contract as costs are incurred related to that contract.

        Milestone payments are recognized as revenue upon the achievement of mutually agreed milestones, provided that (i) the milestone event is substantive and its achievement is not reasonably assured at the inception of the agreement, and (ii) there is no continuing performance obligations associated with the milestone payment. Revenues from milestone payments related to arrangements under which the Company has continuing performance obligations are recognized as revenue upon achievement of the milestone only if all of the following conditions are met: (i) the milestone payments are non-refundable; (ii) achievement of the milestone was not reasonably assured at the inception of the arrangement; (iii) substantive effort is involved in achieving the milestone; and, (iv) the amount of the milestone is reasonable in relation to the effort expended or the risk associated with achievement of the milestone. If any of these conditions are not met, the milestone payments are deferred and recognized as revenue over the term of the arrangement as Celldex completes its performance obligations.

        The Company has capitalized and deferred costs incurred in connection with the one-time signing and upfront payment (the initial deliverable) received with respect to a multiple deliverable

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CELLDEX THERAPEUTICS, INC.

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2008, 2007 and 2006

(1) SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (Continued)


arrangement. If there is deemed a single unit of accounting for such an arrangement, the capitalized deferred costs are amortized over the expected performance period of the arrangement.

        Revenue from contracts and grants, including U.S. government grants under Small Business Innovation Research ("SBIR"), is recognized as the services are performed and recorded as effort is expended on the contracted work and billed to the government or our contractual partner. Product royalty revenue consists of payments received from licensees for a portion of sales proceeds from products that utilize Celldex's licensed technologies and are recognized when the amount of and basis for such royalty payments are reported to us in accurate and appropriate form and in accordance with the related license agreement. Payments received in advance of activities being performed are recorded as deferred revenue. Any significant changes in the Company's estimates or assumptions could impact its revenue recognition.

        Research and development costs, including internal and contract research costs, are expensed as incurred. Research and development expenses consist mainly of clinical trial costs, manufacturing of clinical material, toxicology and other studies, salaries, depreciation, technology access fees, royalty fees, including the cost of Rotarix® royalty revenues retained by the Company, and funding of outside research. Costs to acquire technologies that are utilized in research and development that have no alternative future use are expensed as incurred.

        Acquired In-Process Research and Development ('IPR&D") represents the fair value assigned to research and development projects that we acquire that have not been completed at the date of acquisition and which have no future alternative use. Accordingly, the fair value of such projects is recorded as in process research and development expense as of the acquisition date.

        The value assigned to acquired IPR&D is determined by estimating the costs to develop the acquired technology into commercially viable products, estimating the resulting net cash flows from the projects, and discounting the net cash flows to present value. The revenue and costs projections used to value IPR&D were, as applicable, reduced based on the probability of developing a new drug. Additionally, the projections considered the relevant market sizes and growth factors, expected trends in technology, and the nature and expected timing of new product introductions by us and our competitors. The resulting net cash flows from such projects are based on management's estimates of revenues, cost of sales, operating expenses, and income taxes from such projects. The rates utilized to discount the net cash flows to their present value were commensurate with the stage of development of the projects and uncertainties in the economic estimates used in the projections described above.

        If these projects are not successfully developed, the operations of the company may be adversely affected in future periods. Additionally, the value of other acquired intangible assets may become impaired. We believe that the assumptions used in the Company's IPR&D analysis were reasonable at the time of the respective acquisition. No assurance can be given, however, that the underlying assumptions used to estimate expected project revenues, development costs or profitability, or the events associated with such projects, will transpire as estimated.

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CELLDEX THERAPEUTICS, INC.

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2008, 2007 and 2006

(1) SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (Continued)

        Most of the Company's clinical trials are performed by third-party contract research organizations ("CROs") and certain clinical supplies are manufactured by contract manufacturing organizations ("CMOs"). Invoicing from these third parties may be monthly based upon services performed or based upon milestones achieved. The Company accrues these expenses based upon its assessment of the status of each study or manufacturing activity and the work completed, and upon information obtained from the CROs and CMOs.

        The financial statements of Celldex Ltd have been translated into U.S. dollars in accordance with SFAS No. 52, Foreign Currency Translation. All asset and liability accounts have been translated using the exchange rates in effect at the balance sheet date. Revenues and expenses have been translated using the average exchange rate for the period. Translated gains and losses resulting from the changes in exchange rates have been reported in other comprehensive income (loss). As of December 31, 2008 and December 31, 2007, the accumulated unrealized foreign exchange translation gains (losses) included in accumulated other comprehensive income were ($2,605,726) and $2,619,036, respectively.

        The Company accounts for income taxes in accordance with the provisions of SFAS No. 109, Accounting For Income Taxes. The Company uses the asset and liability method to account for income taxes, including the recognition of deferred tax assets and deferred tax liabilities for the anticipated future tax consequences attributable to differences between financial statement amounts and their respective tax bases. Quarterly, the Company reviews its deferred tax assets for recovery. A valuation allowance is established when the Company believes that it is more likely than not that its deferred tax assets will not be realized. Changes in valuation allowances from period to period are included in the Company's tax provision in the period of change.

        The Company computes and reports earnings per share in accordance with the provisions of SFAS No. 128, Earnings Per Share. The computations of basic and diluted loss per common share are based upon the weighted average number of common shares outstanding and potentially dilutive securities. Potentially dilutive securities include stock options and warrants. Options to purchase 2,070,993, 787,440 and 1,058,659 shares of common stock were not included in the December 31, 2008, 2007 and 2006 computation of diluted net loss per share, respectively, because inclusion of such shares would have an anti-dilutive effect on net loss per share. Share amounts shown on the consolidated balance sheets and share amounts and basic and diluted net loss per share amounts shown on the consolidated statements of operations and comprehensive loss have been adjusted to reflect the Merger exchange ratio and a reverse stock split of 1-for-12 effective March 7, 2008.

        SFAS No. 130, Reporting Comprehensive Income, ("SFAS No. 130") established the standards for reporting and displaying comprehensive income (loss) in financial statements. Comprehensive income

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CELLDEX THERAPEUTICS, INC.

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2008, 2007 and 2006

(1) SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (Continued)

(loss) is defined to include all changes in stockholders' equity (deficit) during the period other than those changes that result from investments by and distributions to stockholders. During the years ended December 31, 2008, 2007 and 2006, the Company reported other comprehensive income (loss) of ($13,310), $230,840 and $2,882,403, respectively, related to unrealized foreign exchange translation gains.

        The Company accounts for stock-based awards under SFAS No. 123 (revised 2004), Share-Based Payment, ("SFAS No. 123(R)"), which requires the measurement and recognition of compensation expense for all share-based payment awards made to employees and directors including employee stock options and employee stock purchases related to the Employee Stock Purchase Plan ("employee stock purchases") based on estimated grant date fair values.

        Compensation expense for all share-based payment awards to employees are recognized using the straight-line method over the term of vesting or performance. As stock-based compensation expense recognized in the Consolidated Statement of Operations is based on awards ultimately expected to vest, compensation expense has been reduced for estimated forfeitures. SFAS No. 123(R) requires forfeitures to be estimated at the time of grant and revised, if necessary, in subsequent periods if actual forfeitures differ from those estimates.

        The Company estimates the fair value of share-based awards granted using the Black-Scholes option-pricing model ("Black-Scholes model"). The Company's determination of fair value of share-based payment awards on the date of grant using an option-pricing model is affected by the Company's stock price as well as assumptions regarding a number of highly complex and subjective variables. These variables include, but are not limited to, the Company's expected stock price volatility over the term of the awards, and actual and projected employee stock option exercise behaviors.

        SFAS No. 123(R) did not change the accounting guidance for how the Company accounts for options issued to non-employees. The Company accounts for options issued to non-employees in accordance with SFAS No. 123(R) and EITF Issue No. 96-18, Accounting for Equity Instruments That Are Issued to Other Than Employees for Acquiring, or in Conjunction with Selling, Goods or Services. The value of such options is periodically re-measured and income or expense is recognized during the vesting terms.

        See Note 3 for additional information.

        The preparation of the financial statements in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect reported amounts and disclosures. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

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CELLDEX THERAPEUTICS, INC.

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2008, 2007 and 2006

(1) SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (Continued)

        SFAS No. 131, Disclosures about Segments of an Enterprise and Related Information, establishes standards for reporting information on operating segments in interim and annual financial statements. The Company has determined that it is engaged in one industry segment, which is the business of development, manufacturing and commercialization of novel therapeutics for human health care. Management uses consolidated financial information in determining how to allocate resources and assess performance and reviews our operating results on an aggregate basis and manages our operations as a single operating segment.

        SFAS 141(R) and SFAS 160:    In December 2007, the Financial Accounting Standards Board ("FASB") issued SFAS No. 141(R), Business Combinations, ("SFAS No. 141(R)"), and SFAS No. 160, Noncontrolling Interests in Consolidated Financial Statements, an amendment of ARB No. 51, ("SFAS No. 160"), which introduce significant changes in the accounting for and reporting of business acquisitions and noncontrolling interests in a subsidiary. SFAS No. 141(R) is to be applied prospectively to business combinations for which the acquisition date is on or after the beginning of the first annual reporting period beginning on or after December 15, 2008. SFAS No. 160 is effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those fiscal years, beginning on or after December 15, 2008. Earlier adoption of both statements is prohibited. The adoption of SFAS No. 141(R) and SFAS No. 160 will only have an impact on the Company's financial statements if it is involved in a business combination that occurs after January 1, 2009.

        EITF 07-1:    In December 2007, the EITF reached a consensus on Issue No. 07-1, Accounting for Collaborative Arrangements ("EITF 07-1"). The EITF concluded on the definition of a collaborative arrangement and that revenues and costs incurred with third parties in connection with collaborative arrangements would be presented gross or net based on the criteria in EITF 99-19, Reporting Revenue Gross as a Principal versus Net as an Agent, and other accounting literature. Based on the nature of the arrangement, payments to or from collaborators would be evaluated and its terms, the nature of the entity's business, and whether those payments are within the scope of other accounting literature would be presented. Companies are also required to disclose the nature and purpose of collaborative arrangements along with the accounting policies and the classification and amounts of significant financial statement amounts related to the arrangements. Activities in the arrangement conducted in a separate legal entity should be accounted for under other accounting literature; however, required disclosure under EITF 07-1 applies to the entire collaborative agreement. EITF 07-1 is effective for financial statements issued for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2008, and interim periods within those fiscal years, and is to be applied retrospectively to all periods presented for all collaborative arrangements existing as of the effective date. The Company is currently evaluating the effect that the adoption of EITF 07-01 will have on its results of operations and financial condition.

        FSP No. FAS 142-3:    In April 2008, the FASB staff issued FASB Staff Position ("FSP") No. FAS 142-3, Determination of the Useful Life of Intangible Assets ("FSP No. FAS 142-3"). FSP No. FAS 142-3 amends the factors that should be considered in developing renewal or extension assumptions used to determine the useful life of a recognized intangible asset under FASB No. 142.

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CELLDEX THERAPEUTICS, INC.

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2008, 2007 and 2006

(1) SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (Continued)


The intent of this FSP is to improve the consistency between the useful life of a recognized intangible under Statement 142 and the period of expected cash flows used to measure fair value of the asset under FASB No. 141 and other accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America ("U.S.GAAP"). The FSP is effective for financial statements issued for fiscal years beginning after December 31, 2008, and interim periods within those fiscal years. Early adoption is prohibited. The adoption of FSP No. FAS 142-3 is not expected to have a material impact on Celldex's financial position and results of operations.

        SFAS 162:    In May 2008, FASB issued SFAS No. 162, "The Hierarchy of Generally Accepted Accounting Principles", or SFAS 162. SFAS 162 identifies the sources of accounting principles and the framework for selecting the principles to be used in the preparation of financial statements that are presented in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles in the United States. SFAS 162 is effective 60 days following the SEC's approval of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board amendments to AU Section 411, "The Meaning of Present Fairly in Conformity with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles." The Company does not expect SFAS 162 to have a material impact on its results of operations and financial condition.

        EITF 03-6-1:    In June 2008, FASB issued FASB Staff Position No. EITF 03-6-1, "Determining Whether Instruments Granted in Share-Based Payment Transactions Are Participating Securities", or FSP EITF 03-6-1. FSP EITF 03-6-1 addresses whether instruments granted in share-based payment transactions are participating securities prior to vesting and, therefore, need to be included in the earnings allocation in computing earnings per share (EPS) under the two-class method described in paragraphs 60 and 61 of FASB Statement No. 128, "Earnings per Share", or SFAS 128. The guidance applies to the calculation of EPS under SFAS 128 for share-based payment awards with rights to dividends or dividend equivalents. FSP EITF 03-6-1 clarifies that unvested share-based payment awards that contain nonforfeitable rights to dividends or dividend equivalents (whether paid or unpaid) are participating securities and shall be included in the computation of EPS pursuant to the two class method. FSP EITF 03-6-1 is effective for financial statements issued for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2008, and interim periods within those years. All prior-period EPS data presented shall be adjusted retrospectively (including interim financial statements, summaries of earnings and selected financial data) to conform with the provisions of this FSP. Early adoption is not permitted. The Company does not expect the adoption of FSP EITF 03-6-1 will have a material impact on its results of operations and financial condition.

(2) FAIR VALUE MEASUREMENTS

        On January 1, 2008, the Company adopted SFAS No. 157, Fair Value Measurements, ("SFAS No. 157"), and SFAS No. 159, The Fair Value Option for Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities Including an amendment of FASB Statement No. 115, ("SFAS No. 159"), for its financial assets and liabilities. The adoption of SFAS No. 157 did not have a material impact on the Company's financial position or results of operations. As permitted by FASB Staff Position No. FAS 157-2, Effective Date of FASB Statement No. 157, the Company elected to defer the adoption of SFAS No. 157 for all nonfinancial assets and nonfinancial liabilities, except those that are recognized or disclosed at fair value in the financial statements on a recurring basis, until January 1, 2009. SFAS No. 159 permits entities to choose to measure many financial instruments and certain other items at fair value that are

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CELLDEX THERAPEUTICS, INC.

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2008, 2007 and 2006

(2) FAIR VALUE MEASUREMENTS (Continued)


not currently required to be measured at fair value. The Company did not elect to adopt the fair value option for eligible financial instruments under SFAS No. 159.

        SFAS No. 157 provides a framework for measuring fair value under U.S. GAAP and requires expanded disclosures regarding fair value measurements. SFAS No. 157 defines fair value as the exchange price that would be received for an asset or paid to transfer a liability (an exit price) in the principal or most advantageous market for the asset or liability in an orderly transaction between market participants on the measurement date. Market participants are buyers and sellers in the principal market that are (i) independent, (ii) knowledgeable, (iii) able to transact, and (iv) willing to transact.

        SFAS No. 157 requires the use of valuation techniques that are consistent with the market approach, the income approach and/or the cost approach. The market approach uses prices and other relevant information generated by market transactions involving identical or comparable assets and liabilities. The income approach uses valuation techniques to convert future amounts, such as cash flows or earnings, to a single present amount on a discounted basis. The cost approach is based on the amount that currently would be required to replace the service capacity of an asset (replacement cost). Valuation techniques should be consistently applied. SFAS No. 157 also establishes a fair value hierarchy which requires an entity to maximize the use of observable inputs, where available, and minimize the use of unobservable inputs when measuring fair value. The standard describes three levels of inputs that may be used to measure fair value:

Level 1

  Quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities. The Company's Level 1 assets consist of cash equivalents. As of December 31, 2008, the Company held cash equivalents of $43,456,657 held in money market funds.

Level 2

 

Observable inputs other than Level 1 prices, such as quoted prices for similar assets or liabilities; quoted prices in markets that are not active; or other inputs that are observable or can be corroborated by observable market data for substantially the full term of the assets or liabilities. The Company had no Level 2 assets or liabilities at December 31, 2008.

Level 3

 

Unobservable inputs that are supported by little or no market activity and that are significant to the fair value of the assets or liabilities. The Company had no material Level 3 assets or liabilities at December 31, 2008.

        The Company's financial instruments consist mainly of cash and cash equivalents, short-term accounts receivable, accounts payable and debt obligations. Short-term accounts receivable and accounts payable are reflected in the accompanying consolidated financial statements at cost, which approximates fair value due to the short-term nature of these instruments.

(3) STOCK-BASED COMPENSATION

        As of December 31, 2008, the Company had two shareholder approved, share-based compensation plans: the 2004 Employee Stock Purchase Plan (the "2004 ESPP Plan") and the 2008 Stock Option and Incentive Plan (the "2008 Plan").

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CELLDEX THERAPEUTICS, INC.

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2008, 2007 and 2006

(3) STOCK-BASED COMPENSATION (Continued)

Employee Stock Purchase Plan

        The 2004 ESPP Plan was adopted on May 13, 2004 and assumed by the Company in connection with the Merger. All full time employees of the Company are eligible to participate in the 2004 ESPP Plan. A total of 12,500 shares of common stock are reserved for issuance under the 2004 ESPP Plan. Under the 2004 ESPP Plan, each participating employee may contribute up to 15% of his or her compensation to purchase up to 100 shares of common stock per year in any six-month offering period and may withdraw from the offering at any time before stock is purchased. Participation terminates automatically upon termination of employment. The purchase price per share of common stock in an offering is 85% of the lower of its fair market value at either the beginning of the offering period or the applicable exercise date. At December 31, 2008, 9,885 shares were available for issuance under the 2004 ESPP Plan.

        As a consequence of the Merger, no purchase period was offered beginning on January 1, 2008. The last purchase period began on July 1, 2008 and ended on December 31, 2008.

Employee Stock Option and Incentive Plan

Stock Option Plan Description

        On March 6, 2008, the Company's 2008 Plan was adopted at a special meeting of its shareholders. The 2008 Plan replaced the 1999 Stock Option and Incentive Plan (the "1999 Plan") and the Amended and Restated 1991 Stock Compensation Plan, which was an amendment and restatement of the Company's 1985 Incentive Option Plan. The 2008 Plan permits the granting of incentive stock options (intended to qualify as such under Section 422A of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended), non-qualified stock options, stock appreciation rights, performance share units, restricted stock and other awards of restricted stock in lieu of cash bonuses to employees, consultants and outside directors.

        The 2008 Plan allows for a maximum of 1,500,000 shares of common stock to be issued prior to October 19, 2017. The board of directors determines the term of each option, option price, and number of shares for which each option is granted and the rate at which each option vests. Options generally vest over a period not to exceed four years. The term of each option cannot exceed ten years (five years for options granted to holders of more than 10% of the voting stock of the Company) and the exercise price of stock options cannot be less than the fair market value of the common stock at the date of grant (110% of fair market value for incentive stock options granted to holders of more than 10% of the voting stock of the Company). The 2008 Plan also provides for discretionary grants of non-qualified stock options to non-employee directors. Vesting of all employee and non-employee director stock option awards is accelerated upon a change in control as defined in the 2008 Plan.

        In connection with the Merger, the Company assumed the obligations of Celldex Research under Celldex Research's 2005 Equity Incentive Plan (the "Celldex Research 2005 Plan") and each outstanding option to purchase Celldex Research common stock (a "Celldex Research Stock Option") granted under the Celldex Research 2005 Plan. Each Celldex Research Stock Option assumed by the Company is deemed to constitute an option to acquire, on the same terms and conditions as were applicable under the Celldex Research 2005 Plan, shares of the Company's common stock that have been adjusted consistent with the ratio at which the Company's common stock was issued in exchange for Celldex Research's common stock in the Merger. As of March 7, 2008, the Company assumed

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CELLDEX THERAPEUTICS, INC.

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2008, 2007 and 2006

(3) STOCK-BASED COMPENSATION (Continued)


options to acquire 1,446,913 shares of its common stock at a weighted average exercise price of $8.35. The Celldex Research Stock Options generally vest over a two-to four-year period and the term of each option cannot exceed ten years from the date of grant. No additional awards will be issued under the Celldex Research 2005 Plan.

General Option Information

        A summary of stock option activity under the 2008 Plan and the Celldex Research 2005 Plan for the year ended December 31, 2008, adjusted to reflect the Merger exchange ratio and a reverse stock split of 1-for-12 effective March 7, 2008, is as follows:

 
  Shares   Weighted
Average
Exercise
Price
Per Share
  Weighted
Average
Remaining
Contractual
Term (In Years)
 

Options Outstanding at January 1, 2008

    787,440   $ 12.70     5.81  

Granted

    2,738,545     8.36        

Exercised

               

Canceled/forfeited

    (1,450,707 )   10.62        

Expired

    (4,285 )   22.71        
               

Options Outstanding at December 31, 2008

   
2,070,993
 
$

8.39
   
8.69
 
               

Options Vested and Expected to Vest at December 31, 2008

   
1,878,642
 
$

8.40
   
8.68
 

Options Exercisable at December 31, 2008

   
1,154,473
 
$

8.46
   
8.94
 

Options Available for Grant

   
875,506
             

Weighted Average Fair Value of Options Granted during the year

 
$

4.37
             

        The aggregate intrinsic value of options outstanding at December 31, 2008 was $80,478.

Non-Employee Grants

        The Company has historically granted stock options to consultants for services. These options were issued at or above their fair market value on the date of grant and generally have four-year vesting terms from date of grant. Should the Company or the consultant terminate the consulting agreements, any unvested options will be cancelled. Options issued to non-employees are marked-to-market, which means that as the Company's stock price fluctuates, the related expense either increases or decreases. The Company recognized expense of $409,229, $85,515 and $41,638 related to non-employee consultant stock options for the years ended December 31, 2008, 2007 and 2006, respectively.

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CELLDEX THERAPEUTICS, INC.

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2008, 2007 and 2006

(3) STOCK-BASED COMPENSATION (Continued)

Valuation and Expenses Information

        The following table summarizes stock-based compensation expense related to employee and non-employee stock options and employee stock purchases for the years ended December 31, 2008, 2007 and 2006, respectively, which was allocated as follows:

 
  Year Ended
December 31,
2008
  Year Ended
December 31,
2007
  Year Ended
December 31,
2006
 

Research and development

  $ 1,648,997   $ 423,819   $ 671,525  

General and administrative

    3,166,696     1,181,103     1,088,640  
               

Total stock-based compensation expense

  $ 4,815,693   $ 1,604,922   $ 1,760,165  
               

        Based on basic and diluted weighted average common shares outstanding of 14,217,388, 8,309,420 and 8,278,500, the effect of stock-based compensation expense recorded for the years ended December 31, 2008, 2007 and 2006 had a $0.34 per share, $0.19 per share and $0.21 per share negative impact on basic and diluted net loss per common share, respectively.

        During the quarter ended March 31, 2008, the Company entered into an Option Cancellation Agreement concurrent with a Stock Option Grant Agreement with Celldex Research employees. The Option Cancellation Agreement provided for the cancellation of all previously granted options under the Celldex Research 2005 Plan while the Stock Option Grant Agreement provided for the re-grant of stock options pursuant to the Option Cancellation Agreement. In addition, at the consumption of the Merger, all options to purchase former Celldex Research common stock then outstanding under the Celldex Research 2005 Plan were assumed by the Company and converted into options to purchase shares of the Company's common stock. The number of shares subject to the outstanding awards and related exercise price was proportionately adjusted by the same exchange ratio as former Celldex Research shareholders received in accordance with the provisions of the Celldex Research 2005 Plan.

        The Company considered both the re-grant of stock options and exchange of Celldex Research options into options to acquire shares of the Company's common stock as a modification under the provisions of SFAS No. 123(R). The modification affected a total of 15 employees, including members of the Celldex Research board of directors. The total incremental compensation cost resulting from the modifications amounted to approximately $2.6 million, of which $0.9 million was related to vested awards and was recognized immediately as stock based compensation in the quarter ended March 31, 2008.

        In accordance with Dr. Ryan's Severance Agreement (which is discussed further in Note 16), the Company granted Dr. Ryan fully vested stock options for 153,125 shares as of July 16, 2008, the effective date of the Severance Agreement, and recorded $1.3 million of stock-based compensation in general and administrative expense during the quarter ended September 30, 2008.

        As of December 31, 2008, total compensation cost related to non-vested employee and non-employee director stock options not yet recognized was approximately $3.2 million, net of estimated forfeitures, which is expected to be recognized as expense over a weighted average period of 2.01 years. The total fair value of employee and non-employee director stock options vested, including

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CELLDEX THERAPEUTICS, INC.

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2008, 2007 and 2006

(3) STOCK-BASED COMPENSATION (Continued)


the incremental fair value for options vested that were modified, during the twelve months ended December 31, 2008 was $2,785,995.

        The fair values of employee and non-employee director stock options granted during the years ended December 31, 2008, 2007 and 2006 were valued using the Black-Scholes model with the following assumptions:

 
  Year Ended
December 31,
2008
  Year Ended
December 31,
2007(1)
  Year Ended
December 31,
2006(1)
 

Expected stock price volatility (employees)

    55 - 67 %   79.57 %   67.1 %

Expected stock price volatility (non-employee directors)

    57 - 67 %   79.5 %   67.1 %

Expected option term (employees)

    3 - 6.25 Years     5 Years     5.2 Years  

Expected option term (non-employee directors)

    4 - 6 Years     5 Years     5.2 Years  

Risk-free interest rate

    1.75 - 3.27 %   3.85 %   4.52 %

Expected dividend yield

    None     None     None  

(1)
The assumptions for 2007 and 2006 were used by Celldex Research to calculate fair values of stock option grants.

        In 2008, the Company used its daily historical stock price volatility consistent with the expected term of grant as the basis for its expected volatility assumption in accordance with SFAS No. 123(R) and SAB 107 for its employee and non-employee director stock options and employee stock purchases. The Company has concluded that its historical volatility is representative of expected future stock price trends. The expected volatility used by Celldex Research in 2007 and 2006 was based on the average volatility of a group of companies that Celldex Research believed would be considered a peer group had it been a publicly-held company.

        The risk-free interest rate assumption is based upon observed interest rates appropriate for the expected term of the Company's employee and non-employee director stock options and employee stock purchases. The dividend yield assumption is based on the Company's history of zero dividend payouts and expectation that no dividends will be paid in the foreseeable future.

        The expected term of employee and non-employee director stock options represents the weighted-average period the stock options are expected to remain outstanding. SAB 110 provides for a simplified method for estimating expected term for "plain-vanilla" options. The simplified method is based on the vesting period and the contractual term for each grant or for each vesting tranche for awards with graded vesting. The mid-point between the vesting date and the expiration date is used as the expected term under this method. In December 2007, the Securities and Exchange Commission released SAB 110, which extended the use of the simplified method if a company met certain criteria. The Company has concluded that the Merger represents a significant structural change in its business and in the terms of its share option grants such that its historical exercise data may no longer provide a reasonable basis upon which to estimate expected term. The Company has elected to follow the guidance of SAB 110 and has adopted the simplified method in determining expected term for all of its

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CELLDEX THERAPEUTICS, INC.

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2008, 2007 and 2006

(3) STOCK-BASED COMPENSATION (Continued)


stock option awards. There were 205,703 stock options granted to non-employee directors during the year ended December 31, 2008.

        Forfeitures were estimated based on historical experience by applying an eleven and zero percent forfeiture rate to employee and non-employee director stock option awards granted during the years ended December 31, 2008, respectively.

        The Company has not recognized any tax benefits or deductions related to the tax effects of employee stock-based compensation as the Company carries a full deferred tax asset valuation allowance and has significant net operating loss carryforwards available.

(4) RETIREMENT SAVINGS PLAN

        The Company's 401(k) Plan (the "401(k) Plan") is intended to be a tax-qualified plan covering substantially all employees. Under the terms of the 401(k) Plan, employees may elect to contribute up to 15% of their compensation, or the statutory prescribed limits. The Company may make 50% matching contributions on up to 4% of a participant's annual salary. Benefit expense for the 401(k) Plan was approximately $74,269, $39,899 and $21,133 for the years ended December 31, 2008, 2007 and 2006, respectively.

(5) PROPERTY AND EQUIPMENT

        Property and equipment include the following:

 
  December 31,
2008
  December 31,
2007
 

Laboratory Equipment

  $ 2,448,848   $ 1,551,896  

Manufacturing Equipment

    1,507,806      

Office Furniture and Equipment

    1,085,549     405,581  

Leasehold Improvements

    12,564,529     2,046,663  

Construction in Progress

    70,796      
           
 

Total Property and Equipment

    17,677,528     4,004,140  

Less Accumulated Depreciation and Amortization

    (4,110,348 )   (2,086,104 )
           

  $ 13,567,180   $ 1,918,036  
           

        A portion of the purchase price in the Merger totaling $15,170,702 has been allocated and recorded to acquired property and equipment above and was then reduced by approximately $2,606,649 of negative goodwill.

        As a result of the Merger, the Company has converted its Fall River manufacturing facility to provide mammalian cell culture production capabilities and classified certain manufacturing-related equipment having a fair value of $451,100 as long-lived assets to be disposed of by sale. The fair value was established based on quoted market prices by an equipment re-seller less estimated costs to remove and sell the equipment. During the year ended December 31, 2008, the Company sold six of seven and wrote off one of the long-lived assets held-for-sale for $460,494 and recorded a gain of $9,394 on disposal of assets. During the year ended December 31, 2008, the Company disposed, by sale or

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NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2008, 2007 and 2006

(5) PROPERTY AND EQUIPMENT (Continued)


abandonment, assets and assets held-for-sale having a net book value of $646,472 and recorded a net loss of $33,795 to research and development expense.

        Depreciation expense related to equipment and leasehold improvements was $2,176,427, $710,156 and $769,520 for the years ended December 31, 2008, 2007 and 2006, respectively.

        In December 2006, in connection with the assignment of the Company's United Kingdom lease (see Note 16) to a third party, the Company sold certain leasehold improvements, laboratory equipment, and furniture and fixtures for $2,207,854. As a result, the Company recorded a gain on sale of fixed assets in its consolidated statement of operations of $136,161 for the year ended December 31, 2006.

(6) INTANGIBLE AND OTHER ASSETS

        Intangible assets include the following:

 
  December 31, 2008   December 31, 2007  
 
  Estimated
Lives
  Gross
Intangible
Assets
  Accumulated
Amortization
  Net
Intangible
Assets
  Gross
Intangible
Assets
  Accumulated
Amortization
  Net
Intangible
Assets
 

Intangible Assets:

                                         
 

Core Technology

  4.5 - 11 years   $ 2,193,249   $ (530,778 ) $ 1,662,471   $ 1,296,000   $ (263,097 ) $ 1,032,903  
 

Strategic Partner Agreement

  8 years     629,499     (65,038 )   564,461              
 

Asset Held for Sale—Developed Technology

  8 years     273,796     (28,288 )   245,508              
                               

Total Intangible Assets

      $ 3,096,544   $ (624,104 ) $ 2,472,440   $ 1,296,000   $ (263,097 ) $ 1,032,903  
                               

        On March 7, 2008, the Merger was completed. Under the purchase method of accounting, the Company determined the identifiable intangible assets acquired based upon the respective fair values of certain technology and intellectual property acquired and license agreement assumed. The Company has determined that these technologies had alternative future uses and will be incorporated into a number of the Company's vaccine programs. A portion of the purchase price in the transaction totaling $2,174,100 was allocated and recorded to acquired intangible assets above and then was reduced by approximately $373,556 of negative goodwill.

        At December 31, 2008, the Company classified the intangible asset—"developed technology"—as a long-lived asset to be disposed of by sale due to the Company's negotiations with LAHI at year-end and the subsequent sale of the Megan poultry vaccines business related to the developed technology intangible asset to LAHI in January 2009.

        All of the Company's intangible assets are amortized over their estimated useful lives. Total amortization expense for intangible assets was $361,006, $116,932 and $116,932 for the years ended December 31, 2008, 2007 and 2006, respectively.

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CELLDEX THERAPEUTICS, INC.

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2008, 2007 and 2006

(6) INTANGIBLE AND OTHER ASSETS (Continued)

        The estimated future amortization expense of intangible assets as of December 31, 2008 and the five succeeding years and thereafter is as follows:

Year ending December 31,
  Estimated
Amortization
Expense
 

2009

  $ 381,236  

2010

    381,236  

2011

    381,236  

2012

    305,653  

2013

    230,071  

2014 and thereafter

    547,500  

        At December 31, 2008, the balance of other assets includes the net unamortized balance of $6,413,515 of sublicense income royalty fees paid to Duke and TJU in connection with the Pfizer Agreement. As more fully discussed in Note 10, the Company is recognizing the $40 million upfront license fee received from Pfizer on a straight-line basis over the Company's estimated period of performance of 9.5 years. The Company paid these two research universities a total of $6,865,173 in sublicense income royalty fees directly related to the Pfizer Agreement. The sublicense income royalty fees have been deferred and are being amortized to royalty expense over the same 9.5-year performance period at the rate of $180,663 per quarter.

(7) ACCRUED EXPENSES

        Accrued expenses are comprised of amounts owed to employees, vendors, and suppliers for work performed on behalf of us. The Company evaluates the accrued expense balance related to these activities based upon information received from the supplier and estimated progress toward completion of objectives to ensure that the balance is appropriately stated. Such estimates are subject to changes as additional information becomes available. Accrued expenses include the following:

 
  December 31,
2008
  December 31,
2007
 

Accrued License Fees

  $ 672,507   $  

Accrued Payroll and Employee Benefits

    1,953,336     511,038  

Accrued Clinical Trials

    119,523     424,916  

Accrued Manufacturing Expenses

        97,738  

Accrued Professional Fees

    432,010     407,212  

Accrued Restructuring Expenses

        1,011,732  

Other Accrued Expenses

    663,783     66,783  
           

  $ 3,841,159   $ 2,519,419  
           

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CELLDEX THERAPEUTICS, INC.

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2008, 2007 and 2006

(8) INCOME TAXES

        During the first quarter of 2008 the Company underwent a merger in which Celldex Therapeutics, Inc. (then AVANT) and Celldex Research became a combined group for tax reporting purposes. The merger was treated as a purchase under SFAS 141 with Celldex Research being the accounting acquirer. Together they form a combined group and report income taxes as such with Celldex as the parent company and Celldex Research as the subsidiary. As a result of this merger, all of the prior tax attributes of both Celldex and Celldex Research will carry forward for potential future use subject to potential limitations. These tax attributes are included in the Company's income tax provision.

 
  Year Ended December 31,  
 
  2008   2007   2006  

Income tax benefit (provision):

                   
 

Federal

  $ 10,198,100   $ 4,544,800   $ 2,899,100  
 

State

    6,958,100     711,000     512,600  
 

Foreign

    193,000     844,500     2,602,000  
               

    17,349,200     6,100,300     6,013,700  

Deferred tax valuation allowance

    (17,349,200 )   (6,100,300 )   (6,013,700 )
               

  $   $   $  
               

        A reconciliation between the amount of reported income tax and the amount computed using the U.S. Statutory rate of 34% follows:

 
  2008   2007   2006  

Pre-tax book income (loss)

  $ (47,500,572 ) $ (15,073,050 ) $ (17,835,262 )
               

Loss at Statutory Rates

    (16,108,800 )   (4,943,800 )   (5,506,600 )

Research and Development Credits

    (1,325,000 )   (306,000 )   (276,000 )

State Taxes

    (6,958,100 )   (711,100 )   (512,600 )

Other

    85,300     (139,400 )   281,500  

In-Process R&D

    6,957,400          

Expiration of Net Operating Losses and Research & Development Tax Credits

    (7,830,000 )        

Change in Valuation Allowance

    25,179,200     6,100,300     6,013,700  
               

  $   $   $  
               

        Deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized based on temporary differences between the financial reporting and tax basis of assets and liabilities using future expected enacted rates. A valuation allowance is recorded against deferred tax assets if it is more likely than not that some or all of the deferred tax assets will not be realized.

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NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2008, 2007 and 2006

(8) INCOME TAXES (Continued)

        The principal components of the deferred tax assets and liabilities at December 31, 2008 and 2007, respectively, are as follows:

 
  December 31,
2008
  December 31,
2007
 

Gross Deferred Tax Assets

             
 

Net Operating Loss Carryforwards

  $ 94,406,000   $ 20,960,000  
 

Tax Credit Carryforwards

    15,026,000     1,347,000  
 

Deferred Expenses

    16,835,000     2,267,000  
 

Stock-based Compensation

    2,049,000     1,148,000  
 

Fixed Assets

    1,458,000     571,000  
 

Accrued Expenses and Other

    474,000     324,000  
 

Deferred Revenue

    2,094,000     477,000  
           

    132,342,000     27,094,000  

Gross Deferred Tax Liabilities

             
 

Acquired Intangibles

    (101,000 )    
 

Deferred Tax Assets Valuation Allowance

    (132,241,000 )   (27,094,000 )
           

Net Deferred Tax Asset (Liability)

  $   $  
           

        As of December 31, 2008, the Company had federal and state net operating loss ("NOL") carryforwards of approximately $227,164,000 and $82,685,000, respectively, and federal and state research and development ("R&D") credit carryforwards of approximately $10,425,000 and $6,972,000, respectively. The federal and state net operating loss and R&D credit carryforwards relate primarily to the acquisition of AVANT in the first quarter of 2008. The Company also has a wholly owned subsidiary with net operating losses of approximately $34,416,000. These losses and credits, which expire at various dates starting in 2009 and going through 2028, may be available to offset future federal, state and foreign income tax liabilities. Utilization of the NOL and R&D credit carryforwards may be subject to substantial annual limitation due to ownership change limitations that have occurred previously or that could occur in the future provided by Section 382 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as well as similar state provisions. These ownership changes may limit the NOL and R&D credit carryforwards that can be utilized annually to offset future taxable income and tax, respectively. In general, an ownership change, as defined by Section 382, results from transactions increasing the ownership of certain shareholders or public groups in the stock of a corporation by more than 50 percentage points over a three-year period. Since the Company's formation, the Company has raised capital and completed acquisitions through the issuance of capital stock on several occasions which may have resulted in one or more changes of control, as defined by Section 382, or could result in a change of control in the future upon subsequent disposition.

        The Company has not currently completed a study to assess whether an ownership change has occurred, or whether there have been multiple ownership changes since our formation, due to the significant complexity and related costs associated with such study. If the Company has experienced a change of control at any time since its formation, utilization of its NOL or tax credit carryforwards

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NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2008, 2007 and 2006

(8) INCOME TAXES (Continued)


would be subject to an annual limitation under Section 382. Further, until a study is completed and any limitations known, no amounts are being presented as an uncertain tax position under FIN 48.

        In addition to uncertainties surrounding the use of NOL carryforwards in a change of control, the Company has identified orphan drug and research and development credits as material components of its deferred tax asset. The uncertainties in these components arise from judgments in the allocation of costs utilized to calculate these credits. The Company has not conducted studies to analyze these credits to substantiate the amounts due to the significant complexity and cost associated with such study. Any limitation may result in expiration of a portion of the NOL or tax credits carryforwards before utilization. Further, until a study is completed and any limitation known, no amounts are being presented as an uncertain tax position under FIN 48.

        Massachusetts, New Jersey and Missouri are the three states in which the Company primarily operates or has operated and has income tax nexus. Open federal and state return years subject to examination by major tax jurisdictions include the tax years ended December 31, 2005, 2006 and 2007. Carryforward attributes that were generated prior to 2005 may still be adjusted upon examination by the Internal Revenue Service if they either have been or will be used in a future period. The Company is currently not under examination by the Internal Revenue Service or any other jurisdictions for any tax years.

        On January 1, 2007, the Company adopted FASB Interpretation No. 48, Accounting for Uncertainty in Income Taxes—an interpretation of FASB Statement 109 ("FIN 48"). FIN 48 prescribes a comprehensive model for recognizing, measuring, presenting and disclosing in the financial statements tax positions taken or expected to be taken on a tax return, including a decision whether to file or not to file in a particular jurisdiction. As a result of the implementation of FIN 48, Celldex recognized no material adjustment in the liability for unrecognized income tax benefits. As a result of the adoption of FIN 48 there is no material impact of unrecognized income tax benefits.

        The Company's policy is to recognize interest and penalties related to uncertain tax positions in income tax expense. There have been no interest or penalties recognized in the consolidated statement of operations and on the consolidated balance sheet as a result of FIN 48 calculations. The Company has not recorded any interest and penalties on any unrecognized tax benefits since its inception.

        As required by Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 109, management has evaluated the positive and negative evidence bearing upon the realizability of its net deferred tax assets, which are comprised principally of net operating loss carryforwards, capitalized R&D expenditures and R&D tax credit carryforwards. Management has determined that it is more likely than not that Celldex will not recognize the benefits of federal and state deferred tax assets and, as a result, a valuation allowance of approximately $132,241,000 has been established at December 31, 2008. The net increase in the valuation allowance for 2008 is primarily due to the acquisition of AVANT.

(9) STOCKHOLDERS' EQUITY

        The Company has a shelf registration statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission to register for sale any combination of securities described in the filing up to a dollar

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NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2008, 2007 and 2006

(9) STOCKHOLDERS' EQUITY (Continued)

amount of $40 million. At December 31, 2008, no securities had been sold by the Company from this shelf registration.

        At December 31, 2008, the Company had authorized preferred stock comprised of 96,925 shares of convertible Class B and 3,000,000 shares of convertible Class C of which 350,000 shares has been designated as Class C-1 Junior Participating Cumulative, the terms of which are to be determined by our Board of Directors. There was no preferred stock outstanding at December 31, 2008.

        The Company's Board has adopted a Shareholder Rights Plan, as set forth in the Shareholder Rights Agreement between the Company and Computer Investor Services, LLC (formerly EquiServe Trust Company, N.A.), as Rights Agent (the "Rights Agreement"). Pursuant to the terms of the Rights Agreement, the Board declared a dividend distribution of one Preferred Stock Purchase Right for each outstanding share of the Company's common stock. These rights, which expire in November 2014, entitle their holders to purchase from the Company one ten-thousandth of a share (a "Unit") of Series C-1 Junior Participating Cumulative Preferred Stock, par value $0.01 per share, ("C-1 Preferred Stock") at a cash exercise price of $35.00 per Unit, subject to adjustment. The rights will trade separately from the common stock and will become exercisable only when a person or group has acquired 15% or more of the outstanding common stock or upon the commencement by a person or group of a tender offer that would result in such person or group acquiring 15% or more of the outstanding common stock other than as a result of repurchases of stock by the Company or certain inadvertent actions by a shareholder. In the event a person or group acquires 15% or more of the outstanding common stock each holder of a right (except for any such person or group) would be entitled to receive upon exercise sufficient Units of C-1 Preferred Stock to equal a value of two times the exercise price of the purchase right. In the event the Company is acquired in a merger or other business combination transaction or if 50% or more of the Company's assets or earning power is sold, each holder of a right (except for any such person or group described above) would receive upon exercise common stock of the acquiring company with a value equal to two times the exercise price of the right.

        As of December 31, 2008, the Company has authorized the issuance of 350,000 shares of C-1 Preferred Stock for use in connection with the shareholder rights plan.

        At the special meeting of the Company's shareholders held on March 6, 2008 in connection with the Merger (as described in Note 1), stockholders approved four proposals: (i) the issuance of shares of the Company's common stock pursuant to the Merger Agreement in the amount necessary to result in the former Celldex Research stockholders owning 58% of the Company's common stock on a fully diluted basis, (ii) an amendment to the Company's Third Restated Certificate of Incorporation to increase the number of authorized shares to 300,000,000, (iii) an amendment to the Company's Third Restated Certificate of Incorporation to effect a reverse stock split in a ratio ranging from one-for-twelve to one-for-twenty of all the issued and outstanding shares of the Company's common

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NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2008, 2007 and 2006

(9) STOCKHOLDERS' EQUITY (Continued)

stock, the final ratio to be determined within the discretion of the Company's board of directors and (iv) adoption of the 2008 Stock Option and Incentive Plan.

        The Company's board of directors approved a 1-for-12 reverse stock split of its common stock, which became effective on, March 7, 2008. As a result of the reverse stock split, each twelve shares of common stock were combined and reclassified into one share of common stock and the total number of shares outstanding was reduced from approximately 180 million shares (including the shares issued to former Celldex Research stockholders in the merger) to approximately 15 million shares.

        Also, pursuant to the terms of the Merger Agreement, former Celldex Research shareholders received 4.96 shares of common stock in exchange for each share of Celldex common stock and Class A common stock they own. The Company's stockholders retained 42% of, and the former Celldex Research stockholders owned 58% of, the outstanding shares of the Company's common stock on a fully-diluted basis. The Company also assumed all of Celldex Research's stock options outstanding at the time of the Merger.

(10) PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT AND LICENSING AGREEMENTS

        Our revenue from product development and licensing agreements was received pursuant to contracts and arrangements with different organizations. Total revenue recognized by us in connection with these contracts for the years ended December 31, 2008, 2007 and 2006 were $7,455,507, $1,405,592 and $899,184, respectively. A summary of these contracts follows:

        In 1997, the Company entered into an agreement with Glaxo to collaborate on the development and commercialization of the Company's oral rotavirus strain and Glaxo assumed responsibility for all subsequent clinical trials and all other development activities. The Company's licensed-in the rotavirus strain that was used to develop Glaxo's Rotarix® rotavirus vaccine in 1995 and owes a license fee of 30% to Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center ("CCH") on net royalties received from Glaxo. The Company is obligated to maintain a license with CCH with respect to the Glaxo agreement. All licensing fees are included in research and development expense. The term of the Glaxo agreement is through the expiration of the last of the relevant patents covered by the agreement, although Glaxo may terminate the agreement upon 90 days prior written notice.

        In May 2005, the Company entered into an agreement whereby an affiliate of PRF purchased an interest in the net royalties the Company will receive on worldwide sales of Rotarix®. Under the PRF agreement, the Company will retain 50% of future Glaxo milestone payments beginning on the effective date of the agreement with PRF, with 70% of the remaining balance payable to PRF and 30% of the remaining balance payable to CCH, respectively. The Company's retained interests in Rotarix® net royalties which were not sold to PRF are recorded as product royalty revenue and a corresponding amount that is payable to CCH is recorded as royalty expense, which is included in research and development expense. For the year ended December 31, 2008, the Company recognized revenue of $3,259,565, including $225,000 related to the GSK milestone payment discussed below, related to its retained interests in Rotarix®, respectively, which is payable to CCH.

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CELLDEX THERAPEUTICS, INC.

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2008, 2007 and 2006

(10) PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT AND LICENSING AGREEMENTS (Continued)

        On April 3, 2008, Rotarix® received FDA market approval for the prevention of rotavirus gastroenteritis in infants, which triggered a $1.5 million milestone payment to the Company from Glaxo, $750,000 of which the Company has retained under its agreement with PRF. In connection with the Company's purchase accounting for the Merger, the present value of the Company's retained amount, or $742,300, had been recorded as a current asset as of March 31, 2008. During the quarter ended June 30, 2008, the Company also recorded $225,000 in revenue and an offsetting amount in royalty expense for the payable due to CCH for its portion of the Glaxo milestone. The market launch of Rotarix® by Glaxo in the U.S. market during the quarter ended September 30, 2008 resulted in a $10 million milestone payment to the Company from PRF, which the Company received on October 1, 2008. As of March 31, 2008, the Company recorded the expected present value of the $10 million milestone payment due from PRF of $9,053,200, the purchase accounting value assigned to the PRF milestone payment at the time of the Merger. During the quarter ended September 30, 2008, the Company recognized the balance of $946,800 as other income in the consolidated statement of operations. The Company has received $60 million in total milestone payments under the PRF agreement. No additional milestone payments are due from PRF under the agreement.

        Royalty rates on Rotarix® escalate from 7% to 10% based on net product sales in countries that have valid patent protection. These royalty rates are discounted by 30% for "non-patent" countries (primarily international markets). In September 2006, the Company received notice from Glaxo that Glaxo would begin paying royalties on sales of Rotarix® vaccine at the lower of the two royalty rates under their 1997 license agreement. Glaxo's decision to pay the lower royalty rate (which is 70% of the full rate) is based upon Glaxo's assertion that Rotarix® is not covered by the patents Glaxo licensed from the Company in Australia and certain European countries. If Glaxo's position stands, the royalties to which PRF is entitled will no longer be limited by a $27.5 million annual threshold, which the Company projected may have been reached in later years as sales of Rotarix® increased. Irrespective of Glaxo's position, the Company will still retain approximately 65% of the royalties on worldwide sales of Rotarix® once PRF receives 2.45 times the aggregate cash payments of $60 million it made to Celldex, though the potential amount of such residual royalties will be lower if Glaxo's position stands.

        On December 21, 2005, Corixa, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Glaxo, and Celldex Ltd (formerly Lorantis), entered into a termination agreement of their collaboration of CDX-2101, or HepVax, for the development of a therapeutic vaccine for Hepatitis B (the "Termination Agreement"). Under the terms of the Termination Agreement, Glaxo paid the Company the sum of approximately $1,632,000. In addition, and subject to the terms and conditions of the Termination Agreement, Glaxo granted to the Company a worldwide, fully paid up, royalty-free, perpetual, nonexclusive license under the Corixa Patent Rights, Corixa Know-How Rights and Corixa Licensed Technology (each as defined in the Termination Agreement): (a) to use RC-529SE in products being developed and/or commercialized by Celldex Ltd or its Permitted Sublicensees in the Lorantis Field; and (b) to make or have made RC-529SE using RC-529 adjuvant for the limited use permitted by the license granted to reformulate Corixa's proprietary adjuvant.

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CELLDEX THERAPEUTICS, INC.

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2008, 2007 and 2006

(10) PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT AND LICENSING AGREEMENTS (Continued)

        The Company has concluded that because the original collaboration between Corixa and Lorantis contained multiple deliverables, EITF 00-21 applies. For the years ended December 31, 2008, 2007 and 2006, the Company recognized $466,156 of revenue under the Termination Agreement.

        On April 16, 2008, the Company and Pfizer entered into a License and Development Agreement (the "Pfizer Agreement") under which Pfizer was granted an exclusive worldwide license to a therapeutic cancer vaccine candidate, CDX-110, in Phase 2 development for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme. The Pfizer Agreement also gives Pfizer exclusive rights to the use of EGFRvIII vaccines in other potential indications. Under the Pfizer Agreement, Pfizer made an upfront payment to the Company of $40 million and made a $10 million equity investment in the Company. Pfizer will fund all development costs for these programs. The Company is also eligible to receive potential milestone payments exceeding $390 million for the successful development and commercialization of CDX-110 and additional EGFRvIII vaccine products, as well as royalties on any product sales. The Pfizer Agreement became effective after clearance under the Hart-Scott-Rodino Antitrust Improvements Act of 1976 (as amended) on May 19, 2008.

        On May 27, 2008, the Company received $10 million from Pfizer in exchange for 781,250 shares of the Company's common stock having a fair value of $10,867,188, or $13.91 per share, on that date. The $867,188 over the amount received from Pfizer was recorded as a reduction to deferred revenue of the $40 million upfront payment received from Pfizer on June 18, 2008.

        The Company has applied the provisions of Emerging Issues Task Force (EITF) Issue No. 00-21 ("EITF 00-21"), Accounting for Revenue Arrangements with Multiple Deliverables, and determined that its performance obligations under this collaboration should be accounted for as a single unit of accounting. The Company's deliverables under this collaboration primarily include an exclusive license to its CDX-110 product candidate and its EGFRvIII technologies, research and development services as required under the collaboration and participation in the joint clinical development committee. The Company has estimated that its performance period under the collaboration will be 9.5 years based on an assessment of the period over which the Company will have met its performance obligations under the collaboration. Revenue, including research and development reimbursements, is being recognized on a straight-line basis over this period using the Contingency Adjusted Performance Model ("CAPM"). The $40,000,000 up-front payment was recorded as deferred revenue and this amount, less the $867,188 in excess fair value for the Company's common stock discussed above, is being amortized over the 9.5-year performance period at a rate of $1,029,810 per quarter.

        The agreement also provides for reimbursement by Pfizer of all costs incurred by the Company in connection with the collaboration since the effective date. The Company invoices Pfizer monthly for its reimbursable costs and records the invoiced amount as deferred revenue. These deferred revenue amounts are amortized to revenue over the expected 9.5-year performance period on a straight-line basis using the CAPM model. For the year ended December 31, 2008, the Company had incurred and invoiced Pfizer $4,856,735 in reimbursable costs related to the Pfizer collaboration.

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CELLDEX THERAPEUTICS, INC.

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2008, 2007 and 2006

(10) PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT AND LICENSING AGREEMENTS (Continued)

        For the year ended December 31, 2008, the Company recorded revenue under this collaboration of $2,870,359 which is included in Product Development and Licensing Agreements Revenue. Of this amount, $2,551,639 was attributed to the amortization of the $40 million upfront payment and $318,720 was attributed to the $4,856,735 reimbursable costs incurred by the Company for which Pfizer is obligated to reimburse the Company.

        In connection with the initial deliverables under the Pfizer Agreement as discussed further in Note 11, the Company has paid a sublicense fee of $2,365,174 to each of two research universities, Duke University ("Duke") and Thomas Jefferson University ("TJU"), and paid TJU an additional license fee of $500,000. The Company paid an additional sublicense fee to TJU of $1,634,826 in October 2008. The Company has capitalized a total of $6,865,173 of deferred costs in the "Other Assets" line item in the consolidated balance sheet. These deferred costs are being amortized over the 9.5-year performance period at a rate of $180,663 per quarter. The Company has recognized $451,657 of these costs as royalty expense during the year ended December 31, 2008. The unamortized balance of deferred costs at December 31, 2008 was $6,413,516.

        The Company entered into a licensing agreement in December 2000 with Pfizer's Animal Health Division whereby Pfizer has licensed Megan's technology for the development of animal health and food safety vaccines. Under the agreement, the Company may receive additional milestone payments of up to $3 million based upon attainment of specified milestones. The Company may receive royalty payments on eventual product sales. The term of this agreement is through the expiration of the last of the patents covered by the agreement. The Company has no obligation to incur any research and development costs in connection with this agreement.

        As of June 1, 2006, the Company entered into a Collaborative Research and Development Agreement with Pfizer aimed at the discovery and development of vaccines to protect animals. In 2007, further funded work at the Company on the joint research program was terminated by Pfizer after the Company provided two of four deliverables to Pfizer.

        The Company is developing a vaccine, CDX-2401, aimed at providing protection from infection with HIV, the virus known to cause AIDS. This program is in a Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation funded partnership with collaborators at Rockefeller and the Aaron Diamond AIDS Research Center, who have shown in model systems that protective immunity can be induced with such a vaccine. Preclinical studies and manufacturing development are in progress and payments to the Company are made on a time and materials basis. For the years ended December 31, 2008, 2007 and 2006, the Company recognized grant revenue from Rockefeller of $428,569, $829,610 and $252,457, respectively.

(11) RESEARCH COLLABORATION AND LICENSING AGREEMENTS

        Celldex has entered into licensing agreements with several universities and research organizations. Under the terms of these agreements, we have received licenses or options to license technology, specified patents or patent applications. Celldex has expensed nonrefundable license fees of

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NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2008, 2007 and 2006

(11) RESEARCH COLLABORATION AND LICENSING AGREEMENTS (Continued)


approximately $752,642, $220,000 and $325,000 in the years ended December 31, 2008, 2007 and 2006, respectively.

        The Company and Medarex have entered into an Assignment and License Agreement that provides for the assignment of certain patent and other intellectual property rights and a license to certain Medarex technology and a Research and Commercialization Agreement which provides the Company with certain rights to obtain exclusive commercial licenses to proprietary monoclonal antibodies raised against certain antigens. Under these agreements with Medarex, Celldex may be obligated to pay license fees, milestone payments and royalties relating to the development and regulatory approval of certain of its technologies.

        Under the terms of the Research and Commercialization Agreement with Medarex, Celldex will be required to pay Medarex license fees to obtain commercial licenses for antibodies arising from research licenses granted by Medarex. Celldex will also be required to pay Medarex milestone payments with respect to the development of any products containing such licensed antibodies. These fees and milestones may total up to $7 to $10 million per licensed antibody if a product containing such licensed antibody receives approval from the FDA and/or equivalent foreign agencies. None of Celldex's product candidates currently under development trigger such milestone payments. In general, potential milestone payments for Celldex's antibody product candidates may or may not be triggered and may vary in size depending on a number of variables, almost all of which are currently uncertain. Typically, the events that trigger these payments per product candidate include:

        In addition, Celldex will be required to pay royalties on any sales of products containing licensed antibodies. The royalties will be payable on a country-by-country and product-by-product basis until the date which is the later of: (i) the expiration of the last-to-expire of the Medarex patents covering the product in such country or (ii) the tenth anniversary of the first commercial sale of a product in such country. Celldex will also be responsible for the payment of any royalties, license fees and milestone and other payments due to third parties if Celldex licenses any additional technology in order to commercialize such products.

        To date, Celldex has not made any royalty payments on sales of any products and believes it is at least a number of years away from selling any products that would require Celldex to make any such royalty payments. Whether Celldex will be obligated to make milestone or royalty payments in the future is subject to the success of Celldex's product development efforts and, accordingly, is inherently uncertain.

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NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2008, 2007 and 2006

(11) RESEARCH COLLABORATION AND LICENSING AGREEMENTS (Continued)

        On November 1, 2005, the Company and Rockefeller University ("Rockefeller") entered into a license agreement for the exclusive worldwide rights to human DEC-205 receptor, with the right to sublicense the technology. The license grant is exclusive except that Rockefeller may use and permit other nonprofit organizations to use the human DEC-205 receptor patent rights for educational and research purposes. In addition, the Company acknowledges that Rockefeller has granted Howard Hughes Medical Institute ("HHMI") a paid-up, nonexclusive, irrevocable license to use the patent rights, biological materials, and technical information for HHMI's research purposes, but with no right to sublicense. The Company may also be required to pay royalties on any product sales. The royalties will be payable on a country-by-country and licensed product-by-licensed product basis until the date which is the later of (i) the expiration of the last to expire of the patents covering the licensed product in such country or (ii) ten years following the first commercial sale of a licensed product in such country.

        The Company may be required to pay license fees and milestone payments to Rockefeller with respect to development of the human DEC-205 receptor. These fees and milestones may total up to $2 million to $4 million per product candidate that receives approval from the FDA and equivalent foreign agencies.

        On September 1, 2006, the Company and Duke University Brain Tumor Cancer Center of Duke University ("Duke") entered into a license agreement that gave the Company access and reference to the clinical data generated by Duke and its collaborators in order for the Company to generate its own filing with the FDA relating to its CDX-110 product.

        In exchange for referencing all the Duke data, the Company paid Duke a one-time upfront payment of $175,000 and issued to Duke 100,000 shares of the Company's common stock, which the Company recorded in 2006 as a licensing expense in research and development. The estimated aggregate fair value of the common shares issued was $330,000.

        The Company may be required to pay license fees and milestone payments to Duke with respect to development of the CDX-110 product. These fees and milestones may total up to $1.2 million if CDX-110 receives approval from the FDA and equivalent foreign agencies. The Company may also be required to pay royalties upon approval of CDX-110. The royalties will be payable on a country-by-country and licensed product-by-licensed product basis until the date of the expiration of the last to expire of the patents covering the licensed product in such country.

        In connection with the Pfizer Agreement discussed in Note 10, the Company determined that $2,365,174 was payable to Duke as a sublicense fee. As agreed by Duke, at the Company's option, 50% of this amount was paid to Duke in the form of 81,512 shares of the Company's common stock in October 2008.

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NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2008, 2007 and 2006

(11) RESEARCH COLLABORATION AND LICENSING AGREEMENTS (Continued)

        On October 20, 2006, the Company and Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research ("Ludwig") entered into an agreement for the nonexclusive rights to six cancer tumor targets for use in combination with the Company's APC Targeting Technology. The term of the agreement is for ten years. As consideration for the nonexclusive license, the Company agreed to pay an annual license fee of $7,500 and $2,500 for each full-length antigen and partial-length antigen, respectively, until such antigens enter a randomized Phase 1 clinical trial.

        As additional consideration for the nonexclusive license, the Company may be required to pay license fees and milestone payments to Ludwig for the use of the cancer targets in combination with the Company's technology. The fees and milestones may total up to $1.5 million to $2.5 million on a product candidate that receives approval from the FDA and equivalent foreign agencies. The Company may also be required to pay royalties upon approval of any product candidate. The royalties will be payable on a country-by-country and licensed product-by-licensed product basis until the date of the expiration of the last to expire of the patents covering the licensed product in such country.

        In February 2003, the Company entered into three exclusive license agreements with Thomas Jefferson University ("TJU"). Under the license agreements, TJU has granted a worldwide fee-and royalty-bearing exclusive license. Under these licenses, the Company will be obligated to pay TJU milestone payments which may total up to $3 million for the first licensed product developed during the term of the license agreements, an annual license fee of $45,000, patent and other expenses associated with licenses, as well as royalties on net sales of licensed products during the term of the license agreements. The Company also issued 100,000 shares of its common stock to TJU. In the event that TJU provides notice of default and the default is not cured within 60 days of such notice, TJU may terminate the license agreements. In connection with the Pfizer Agreement, the Company amended its licenses with TJU to add additional sublicensing rights and made a $500,000 one-time license payment to TJU in June 2008.

        As discussed in Note 10, the Company paid a sublicense fee of $2,365,174 to TJU during the quarter ended September 30, 2008 and paid an additional sublicense fee of $1,634,826 to TJU in October 2008.

        In February 2007, the Company entered into a research and development partnership with Select Vaccines, a public Australian biotechnology company, focused on the use of Select Vaccines' virus-like particles ("VLPs") as a platform technology for the development of viral vaccines. Under the terms of the agreement, the Company made an upfront equity investment of $735,000 in Select Vaccines and agreed to fund influenza vaccine research and development for two years, as well as provide payments to Select Vaccines for the achievement of specific preclinical and clinical development milestones. On November 1, 2007, the Company notified Select Vaccines that, effective December 31, 2007, the Company was exercising its rights to terminate its Collaboration and License Agreement with Select Vaccines for strategic reasons.

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NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2008, 2007 and 2006

(11) RESEARCH COLLABORATION AND LICENSING AGREEMENTS (Continued)

        In August 2008, the Company sold its equity investment in Select Vaccine shares for net proceeds of $250,882 and recorded a loss of $297,129. The Company had classified its equity investment in Select Vaccine shares as available-for-sale securities under SFAS 115, Accounting for Certain Investments in Debt and Equity Securities, ("FAS 115").

        On June 11, 2008, the Company and 3M Company entered into a license agreement for the exclusive worldwide rights to access 3M Company's proprietary Immune Response Modifier Resiquimod™ (and additional Toll-Like Receptor 7/8 agonists ("TLR")) for clinical study with Celldex's proprietary APC Targeting Technology, for use as vaccine adjuvants, with the right to sublicense the technology.

        The Company paid 3M Company a one-time upfront license fee which was charged to research and development expense in the quarter ended June 30, 2008. The Company may be required to pay annual license fees and milestone payments to 3M Company with respect to development of Resiquimod™. The Company may also be required to pay royalties upon approval of any product candidate. The royalties will be payable on a country-by-country and licensed product-by-licensed product basis until the date of the expiration of the last to expire of the patents covering the licensed product in such country.

        In November 2008, the Company entered into an Exclusive Patent and Know-How License Agreement with the University of Southampton, UK, to develop human antibodies towards CD27, a potentially important target for immunotherapy of various cancers. CD27 is a critical molecule in the activation pathway of lymphocytes, is downstream from CD40, and may provide a novel way to regulate the immune responses. In pre-clinical models, antibodies to CD27 have been shown to mediate anti-tumor effects alone, and may be particularly effective in combination with the Company's other immunotherapies.

        The Company paid Southampton a one-time upfront license fee which was charged to research and development expense in the quarter ended December 31, 2008. The Company may be required to pay annual license fees and milestone payments to Southampton with respect to development of CD27. The Company may also be required to pay royalties upon approval of any product candidate. The royalties will be payable on a country-by-country and licensed product-by-licensed product basis until the date of the expiration of the last to expire of the patents covering the licensed product in such country.

(12) RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS

        Medarex is a major shareholder of Celldex, owning approximately 31.4% of the Company's outstanding common stock at December 31, 2008. The Company and Medarex have entered into the

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NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2008, 2007 and 2006

(12) RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS (Continued)


following agreements, each of which was approved by a majority of its independent directors who did not have an interest in the transaction. These agreements include:

        The Company may be required to pay license fees and milestone payments to Medarex with respect to any antibodies developed using its HuMab-Mouse technology. These fees and milestones may total up to $7 million to $10 million per antibody that receives approval from the FDA and equivalent foreign agencies.

        The Company may also be required to pay royalties on any product sales. The royalties will be payable on a country-by-country and licensed product-by-licensed product basis until the date which is the later of (i) the expiration of the last to expire of the patents covering the licensed product in such country or (ii) ten years following the first commercial sale of a licensed product in such country.

        The Company and Medarex entered into a settlement and mutual release agreement on October 19, 2007, whereby the parties agreed to a settlement with respect to a disputed return of capital related to certain unsuccessful initial public offering costs that were funded by Medarex on behalf of the Company in prior years. The Company agreed to issue to Medarex 351,692 of the Company's shares equal in value to $3,038,617, based on the per share price of $8.64 set on the second trading day prior to the closing date of the Merger. Medarex has agreed to amend certain terms of the existing Research and Commercialization Agreement and Assignment and License Agreement. Both parties have agreed to mutual releases under the settlement and mutual release agreement.

        The Company has recorded a payable due Medarex of $2,957,248 at December 31, 2008.

(13) DEFERRED REVENUE

        At December 31, 2008, deferred revenue associated with the Pfizer Agreement represented $41,119,189 of the total current and long-term deferred revenue of $41,420,040 at that date. As more fully discussed in Note 10, Pfizer made a $40 million upfront license payment, made a $10 million equity investment and agreed to reimburse the Company monthly for all costs incurred in connection with the collaborative effort on CDX-110. Through December 31, 2008, the Company has incurred and

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NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2008, 2007 and 2006

(13) DEFERRED REVENUE (Continued)


invoiced Pfizer for reimbursable costs in the amount of $4,856,735. Under applicable accounting literature, the Company has determined that its performance obligations under the Pfizer Agreement should be accounted for as a single unit of accounting over an estimated 9.5-year period of expected performance by the Company under the Agreement. Accordingly, the $40 million upfront license payment, less $867,188 allocated to the fair value of Pfizer equity investment, and the $4,856,735 for reimbursable costs have been deferred and are being recognized as revenue over the 9.5-year period on a straight-line basis utilizing the Contingency Adjusted Performance Model.

        Expected future recognition of the deferred revenue balance at December 31, 2008 for each of the next five years and thereafter is as follows; 2009—$4,931,327, years 2010 through 2013 per year—$4,630,476, and thereafter—$17,966,809.

(14) OTHER LONG-TERM LIABILITIES

        Other long-term liabilities include the following:

 
  December 31,
2008
  December 31,
2007
 

Deferred Rent

  $ 301,171   $ 207,654  

Loan Payable

    686,254      

Note Payable

    300,291      
           
 

Total

    1,287,716     207,654  
           

Less Current Portion

             

Deferred Rent

    57,451     57,447  

Loan Payable

    49,954      

Note Payable

    111,054      
           

    218,459     57,447  
           

Long-Term Portion

  $ 1,069,257   $ 150,207  
           

        In December 2003, the Company entered into a Lease Agreement (the "Lease Agreement"), a Secured Promissory Note: Equipment Loan (the "Secured Promissory Note") and a Security Agreement with the Massachusetts Development Finance Agency ("MassDevelopment"), an economic development entity for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, for the Company to occupy and build-out a manufacturing facility in Fall River, Massachusetts.

        Under the Lease Agreement, the Company received a Specialized Tenant Improvement Loan of $1,227,800 at an interest rate of 5.5% per annum to finance the build-out of its Fall River facility which was recorded as leasehold improvements. The Company is amortizing the leasehold improvements over the remaining expected lease term. Principal and interest payments on the loan are due monthly using an amortization period of 15 years.

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NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2008, 2007 and 2006

(14) OTHER LONG-TERM LIABILITIES (Continued)

        In connection with the Merger, the Company recorded $722,683 as the fair value of the loan payable based on current market interest rates available to the Company for long-term liabilities with similar terms and maturities. At December 31, 2008, the Company has recorded a loan payable of $686,254 to MassDevelopment, of which $49,954 was classified as current and $636,300 as long-term. Based on current market interest rates available to Celldex for long-term liabilities with similar terms and maturities, the fair value of the loan payable is approximately $685,900 at December 31, 2008.

        Under the Secured Promissory Note, the Company received $903,657 from MassDevelopment at an interest rate of 5.5% per annum to finance the purchases of manufacturing and laboratory equipment to be placed in its Fall River facility (the "Loan"). The Loan has a term of 84 months. The Loan is collateralized by all of the equipment purchased with the principal amount. The net book value of these collateralized assets at December 31, 2008 was $359,635.

        In connection with the Merger, the Company recorded $366,251 as the fair value of the note payable based on current market interest rates available to the Company for long-term liabilities with similar terms and maturities. At December 31, 2008, the balance of the note payable to MassDevelopment was $300,291, of which $111,054 was classified as current and $189,237 as long-term. Based on current market interest rates available to Celldex for long-term liabilities with similar terms and maturities, the fair value of the note payable is approximately $358,400 at December 31, 2008.

        The following table summarizes the Company's approximate contractual obligations to MassDevelopment with respect to the loan and note payable:

 
  Loan Payable   Note Payable  
 
  Principal   Interest   Total   Principal   Interest   Total  

2009

  $ 50,000   $ 80,400   $ 130,400   $ 111,100   $ 66,100   $ 177,200  

2010

    51,500     74,300     125,800     144,000     33,200     177,200  

2011

    53,300     67,900     121,200     45,200     2,100     47,300  

2012

    55,200     61,500     116,700              

2013

    57,600     54,500     112,100              

Thereafter

    418,700     164,900     583,600              
                           

Total Obligation

  $ 686,300   $ 503,500   $ 1,189,800   $ 300,300   $ 101,400   $ 401,700  

Less: Current Portion

   
50,000
               
111,100
             

Total Long-Term Portion

 
$

636,300
             
$

189,200
             

(15) COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES

        In November 2005, the Company entered into a lease amendment that extended its lease of laboratory and office space in Needham, Massachusetts through April, 2017 and reduced the Company's leased space to approximately 35,200 square feet. Under this lease amendment, the Company is obligated to pay an escalating base annual rent ranging from $879,700 to $1,161,200 during

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NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2008, 2007 and 2006

(15) COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES (Continued)

the remaining lease term. Aggregate rental payments including common area maintenance costs for the year ended December 31, 2008 for this facility was $1,437,040.

        In December 2003, the Company entered into a lease with MassDevelopment to occupy and build-out an 11,800 square foot manufacturing facility in Fall River, Massachusetts. The lease has an initial seven-year term that expires in December 2010 and two renewal options of five years each. Management has determined that it is reasonably assured that the Company will exercise one five-year renewal option. Therefore, the Company is amortizing leasehold improvements made to the Fall River facility over the remaining original lease term plus one five-year renewal term. In November 2005, December 2006 and October 2008, the Company amended the MassDevelopment lease to increase the rentable space to approximately 14,300, 16,200 and 21,000 square feet, respectively, at the Fall River facility. Aggregate rental payments including common area maintenance costs for the year ended December 31, 2008 for this facility was $390,664.

        The Company leases approximately 20,000 square feet of office and laboratory space in Phillipsburg, New Jersey. The lease has an initial five-year term which expires in August 2011. Under the lease agreement, the Company is obligated to pay an annual rent of approximately $347,700 plus certain common area maintenance costs. Aggregate rental payments including common area maintenance costs for the years ended December 31, 2008 and 2007 for this facility were $370,652 and $347,652, respectively.

        As an incentive to enter into a lease agreement with the Phillipsburg landlord, the Company received four months of rent-free occupancy of the facility, and the Company is amortizing this over the original five-year term of the lease. In addition, the landlord provided the Company with an allowance on future rent payments towards tenant improvements that the Company made to the facility and that credit is included in deferred rent and is being amortized over the lease term. Construction of the tenant improvements was completed in August 2006.

        The Company entered into a letter of credit facility with a national U.S. financial institution for $177,000, which is collateralized by a security deposit for the leased facility in Phillipsburg, New Jersey. The total amount of the security deposit is recorded in Other Assets on the Company's consolidated balance sheets.

        The Company has certain obligations to pay licensors based on payments received by the Company from its licensees. The Company believes that it has in the past, and is continuing to satisfy its payment obligations to its licensors based on the Company's interpretation of its license agreements with those licensors. If a licensor was to disagree with the calculation of payments made by the Company pursuant to the license agreements, then the Company may be required to make additional license payments to one or more licensors. There can be no assurances that a licensor will not dispute the Company's interpretation of those license agreements or the Company's calculation of payments due. Accordingly,

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NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2008, 2007 and 2006

(15) COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES (Continued)

the Company may have a contingent liability, in an amount which it cannot determine with precision, based on the risk that such additional payments may have to be made. There can be no assurances that a license payment, once made, will not be the subject of a later dispute by either the licensor or the Company.

        Obligations for base rent and common area maintenance costs (CAM) under facility and other non-cancelable operating leases as of December 31, 2008 are approximately as follows:

Year ending December 31,
   
 

2009

  $ 2,475,600  

2010

    2,542,800  

2011

    2,506,200  

2012

    2,325,200  

2013 and thereafter

    10,140,100  
       

Total minimum lease payments

  $ 19,989,900  
       

        The Company's total rent and CAM expense for all facility leases was $2,198,356 and $347,652 for the years ended December 31, 2008 and 2007, respectively.

(16) SEVERANCE ARRANGEMENTS

        Dr. Una S. Ryan:    In May 2008, Dr. Una S. Ryan, who had been the President and Chief Executive Officer of the Company, informed the Company's Board of her intention to depart from the Company pending negotiation of the terms of her separation. The Company and Dr. Ryan executed a separation agreement effective July 16, 2008 (the "Separation Agreement") setting forth such terms regarding Dr. Ryan's separation from the Company. The Separation Agreement provided, among other things, for: (i) a lump sum cash payment of $1,323,203, plus interest in the amount of $10,784, which was paid on November 8, 2008; (ii) a mutual general release; (iii) payment of insurance premiums under COBRA for 18 months; (iv) reimbursement of attorneys' fees up to $30,000 and (v) vesting of options to purchase 153,125 shares of Company common stock (of the options to purchase 612,500 shares of Company common stock which had been granted to Dr. Ryan on March 7, 2008). The remainder of Dr. Ryan's options terminated as of July 16, 2008. The Separation Agreement also provided for Dr. Ryan's resignation, effective July 16, 2008, from her position as a director of the Company and each of its subsidiaries. At December 31, 2008, the Company has accrued the present value of the expected remaining COBRA benefits due Dr. Ryan totaling $24,542. During the year ended December 31, 2008, the Company paid the lump sum cash payment of $1,323,203, plus interest in the amount of $10,784, reimbursable attorney fees of $30,000 and insurance premiums under COBRA of $6,786.

        With respect to Dr. Ryan's options, the Company recorded stock-based compensation expense of $1.3 million, charged to general and administrative expense, for the fully vested options granted to Dr. Ryan in connection with the Separation Agreement was appropriately recorded in July 2008 when the criteria for establishing a grant date under SFAS 123(R) were met.

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NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2008, 2007 and 2006

(16) SEVERANCE ARRANGEMENTS (Continued)

        Dr. Robert F. Burns:    The Company and Dr. Robert F. Burns, formerly the President and Chief Executive Officer of Celldex Research, entered into a separation and mutual release agreement dated as of October 19, 2007, under which Dr. Burns' employment was terminated, effective as of February 15, 2008. Until such date, Dr. Burns had no obligation to render services to the Company, although he was to hold himself available to consult with the Company by telephone at reasonable times. As severance, the Company was obligated to pay to Dr. Burns the monthly sum of £33,333 for nine consecutive months, commencing with the first payment on March 15, 2008, and a payment of £100,000 on December 15, 2008, in each case less applicable withholdings and other customary payroll deductions. Dr. Burns is also entitled to the continuation of benefits until February 15, 2010. All of Dr. Burns' stock options became fully vested and exercisable on February 15, 2008, and he may exercise them for up to three years following that date. Dr. Burns and the Company provided one another with mutual releases under such separation and mutual release agreement.

        As Dr. Burns has not provided substantive service to the Company since October 19, 2007, these severance benefits, which in the aggregate equal $1,014,017, were accrued in the consolidated financial statements as of December 31, 2007. In addition, stock-based compensation was adjusted for the modification of Dr. Burns' stock option awards in accordance with SFAS No. 123(R).

        The following table sets forth an analysis of the severance costs, which are included in accrued liabilities in the consolidated balance sheet as of December 31, 2008 and 2007:

 
  Balance at
December 31,
2007
  Charges   Paid Cash   Balance at
December 31,
2008
 

Severance and benefits

  $ 1,014,017   $ 1,384,658   $ (2,364,827 ) $ 33,848  
                   

        Exit Activities in the U.K.:    In December 2006, the Company adopted a plan to reduce operating expenses, following its decision to assign its leased facility in Cambridge, United Kingdom, to a third party. The plan included a reduction of 18 full-time employees in both research and development and general and administrative areas of the Company. As a result of staffing reductions, the Company recorded severance benefits expense of $477,508 as of December 31, 2006.

        In December 2006, the Company entered into an agreement with a third party to assign the lease entered into by Celldex Ltd. (formerly Lorantis) in June 2003. Under the assignment, the assignee assumed all costs and expenses associated with the leased facility. As part of the agreement of assignment, the Company agreed to a six-month free rent period to the assignee as an incentive to enter into the lease assignment, whereby the Company paid the rent for the period this period of $691,187. This amount is reflected in the 2006 consolidated statement of operations (see Note 5 for additional information).

(17) MERGER OF CELLDEX AND CELLDEX RESEARCH

        On March 7, 2008, Celldex (formerly AVANT Immunotherapeutics, Inc.) completed the Merger with Celldex Research (formerly Celldex Therapeutics Inc.) with Celldex Research considered the accounting acquirer, even though Celldex (then AVANT) issued common stock and was the surviving legal entity in the transaction. The Company issued 8,309,420 shares of its common stock in exchange

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CELLDEX THERAPEUTICS, INC.

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2008, 2007 and 2006

(17) MERGER OF CELLDEX AND CELLDEX RESEARCH (Continued)


for all of the outstanding capital stock of Celldex Research, on the basis of 4.65 shares of Celldex (then AVANT) common stock for each share of Celldex Research common stock such that Celldex Research shareholders owned 58% of the Company's common stock on a fully diluted basis and Celldex shareholders retained 42%. The Company also issued 351,692 shares having a value of $3,038,617 in settlement of a payable due Medarex. The purchase price of $47,570,867 represents the shares attributable to former AVANT shareholders and consisted of (i) the 6,265,889 shares outstanding of Celldex (then AVANT) common stock on the effective date of the Merger valued at $46,875,372 and (ii) estimated transaction costs totaling $695,495.

        The acquisition has been accounted for as a purchase with Celldex Research the accounting acquirer. Consequently, the operating results of Celldex (then AVANT) since March 8, 2008 have been included in the consolidated results of operations. The purchase price was allocated to the acquired tangible and identifiable intangible assets and assumed liabilities, based upon their fair value at the date of acquisition, as follows:

Tangible assets acquired

  $ 34,959,482  
 

Less: Liabilities assumed

    (3,945,067 )
       

Net tangible assets acquired

    31,014,415  

Intangible assets acquired:

       
 

Core Technology

    897,249  
 

Developed Technology

    273,796  
 

Strategic Partner Agreement

    629,499  
 

In-Process Research and Development ("IPR&D")

    14,755,908  
       
 

Total

  $ 47,570,867  
       

        The values assigned to the intangible assets acquired, including the IPR&D, were determined based on fair market value using a risk adjusted discounted cash flow approach. Fair values for long-term tangible and intangible assets and for IPR&D were then reduced by $6,041,597 of negative goodwill. The Company is a biotechnology enterprise and its resources are substantially devoted to research and development at the date of the Merger. Management is responsible for determining the fair value of the acquired IPR&D.

        The values assigned to IPR&D relate to the development of a typhoid-ETEC-cholera combination travelers vaccine, a cholesterol management vaccine, and the CDX-1135 (formerly TP10) complement inhibitor in the amounts of $7.8 million, $0.9 million and $6 million, respectively. Each of these three significant research and development projects in-process were valued through detailed analysis of product development data concerning the stage of development, time and resources needed to complete the project, expected income-generating ability and associated risks. The value of IPR&D was determined by estimating the costs to develop the purchased in-process technology into commercially viable products, estimating the net cash flows from such projects and discounting the net cash flows back to their present values. The probability of success and discount rates used for each project take into account the uncertainty surrounding the successful development and commercialization of the purchased in-process technology. We expect to incur approximately $16.2 million to move these projects to the point of out-licensing them to third parties. The estimated revenues from the

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CELLDEX THERAPEUTICS, INC.

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2008, 2007 and 2006

(17) MERGER OF CELLDEX AND CELLDEX RESEARCH (Continued)


typhoid-ETEC-cholera vaccine, the cholesterol management vaccine, and CDX-1135 are expected to be generated beginning in 2014, 2015 and 2014, respectively. A discount rate of 29% was used to value these projects, which we believe to be commensurate with the stage of development and the uncertainties in the economic estimates described above. The resulting net cash flows for these projects were based on management's best estimates of revenue, cost of sales, research and development costs, selling, general and administrative costs, and income taxes for each project and the net cash flows reflect assumptions that would be used by market participants.

        The significant assumptions underlying the valuations included potential revenues, costs of completion, the timing of product approvals and the selection of appropriate probability of success and discount rates. None of the Company's IPR&D projects have reached technological feasibility nor do they have any alternative future use. Consequently, in accordance with current U.S. GAAP, the fair value allocated to IPR&D was charged as an expense in the Company's consolidated financial statements as of the date of acquisition. The remaining acquired intangible assets arising from the acquisition are being amortized on a straight line basis over their estimated lives, which range from 4.5 to 8 years.

        As of December 31, 2008, the technological feasibility of the projects had not yet been reached and no significant departures from the assumptions included in the valuation analysis had occurred. Substantial additional research and development will be required prior to reaching technological feasibility. In addition, each product needs to successfully complete a series of clinical trials and to receive FDA or other regulatory approval prior to commercialization. The Company is also dependent upon the activities of its collaborators in developing, manufacturing and marketing its products. There can be no assurance that these projects will ever reach feasibility or develop into products that can be marketed profitably, nor can there be assurance that the Company and its collaborators will be able to develop, manufacture and commercialize these products before the Company's competitors. If these products are not successfully developed and do not become commercially viable, the Company's financial condition and results of operations could be materially affected.

        The following unaudited pro forma financial summary is presented as if the operations of Celldex and Celldex Research were combined as of January 1, 2006. The unaudited pro forma combined results are not necessarily indicative of the actual results that would have occurred had the acquisition been consummated at that date or of the future operations of the combined entities. The following pro forma financial summary includes charges for in-process research and development of $14,755,908 and $14,440,009 for the years ended December 31, 2008 and 2007, respectively, which are material non-recurring charges.

Years Ended December 31,
  2008   2007  

Revenue

  $ 9,016,365   $ 4,174,140  

Net loss

    (52,512,300 )   (52,298,522 )

Basic and diluted net loss per share

    (3.51 )   (3.52 )

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CELLDEX THERAPEUTICS, INC.

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2008, 2007 and 2006

(18) SELECTED QUARTERLY FINANCIAL DATA (Unaudited)

2008
  Q1 2008   Q2 2008   Q3 2008   Q4 2008  

Total revenue

  $ 147,398   $ 1,961,611   $ 2,358,136   $ 2,988,362  

Net loss

    (22,130,682 )   (10,260,510 )   (7,656,158 )   (7,453,221 )

Basic and diluted net loss per common share

    (2.19 )   (0.67 )   (0.49 )   (0.47 )

 

2007
  Q1 2007   Q2 2007   Q3 2007   Q4 2007  

Total revenue

  $ 144,040   $ 609,184   $ 268,974   $ 383,394  

Net loss

    (4,032,403 )   (2,755,137 )   (4,057,018 )   (4,228,492 )

Basic and diluted net loss per common share(1)

    (0.49 )   (0.33 )   (0.49 )   (0.51 )

(1)
Basic and diluted net loss per common share has been adjusted to reflect the Merger exchange ratio and a reverse stock split of 1-for-12 effective March 7, 2008. Per share results for the aggregate of the four quarters may differ from full-year results, as separate computations of the weighted average number of shares outstanding are made for each quarter and for the full year.

(19) SUBSEQUENT EVENTS

        In January 2009, the Company entered into two transactions involving the sale of its poultry vaccines business and the out-licensing of its cholera and ETEC programs as more fully described below.

        On January 13, 2009, the Company entered into a purchase agreement to sell its poultry vaccines business to LAHI. Since 2002, LAHI has performed all manufacturing, marketing and distribution activities for Celldex's marketed Megan®Vac 1 and Megan®Egg poultry vaccines and has paid Celldex product royalties. Financial terms of the transaction with LAHI included an upfront fee and potential milestone payments.

        On January 20, 2009, the Company entered into an Exclusive License and Development Agreement with VTI. Under the license agreement, Celldex has granted a worldwide fee- and royalty-bearing exclusive license to VTI to development and commercialize Celldex's CholeraGarde® and ETEC vaccine programs. Financial terms of the agreement with VTI include an upfront license fee, milestone payments and royalties on net sales of licensed products during the term of the agreement.

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Item 9.    CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE

        None.

Item 9A.    CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures.

        The Company, the registrant, maintains disclosure controls and procedures that are designed to provide reasonable assurance that information required to be disclosed by the Company in its reports that it files and submits under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the "Exchange Act"), is recorded, processed, summarized, and reported within time periods specified by the SEC's rules and forms, and that such information is accumulated and communicated to its management, including its Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, as appropriate to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure.

        As required by Rule 13a 15 under the Exchange Act, as of December 31, 2008, we carried out an evaluation under the supervision and with the participation of our management, including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, of the effectiveness of the design and operation of our disclosure controls and procedures as of the year ended December 31, 2008.

        Based upon that evaluation, our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer have concluded that as of December 31 2008, as a result of the material weakness discussed below, our disclosure controls and procedures were not effective as of December 31, 2008. Notwithstanding the material weakness discussed below, our management has concluded that the consolidated financial statements included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K fairly present in all material respects our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows for the periods presented in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles.

Management's Annual Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting.

        Management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting as defined in Rules 13a-15(f) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. Internal control over financial reporting is designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles of the United States of America ("GAAP"). We recognize that because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies and procedures may deteriorate.

        The Company has conducted its evaluation of the effectiveness of its internal control over financial reporting based upon the framework in Internal Control-Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission.

        A material weakness is a deficiency, or a combination of deficiencies, in internal control over financial reporting, such that there is a reasonable possibility that a material misstatement of the Company's annual or interim financial statements will not be prevented or detected on a timely basis. The following material weakness existed in the Company's internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2008

        The Company did not maintain a sufficient complement of personnel with the appropriate skills, training and experience as of December 31, 2008. Specifically, the quantity and level of experience of the Company's accounting staff did not adequately evolve with the increased roles, responsibilities and

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complexity of the Company's operations as a result of the Merger. Additionally, this material weakness could result in misstatements of financial statement accounts and disclosures that would results in a material misstatement of the consolidated financial statements that would not be prevented or detected.

        Because of this material weakness, management has concluded that our internal control over financial reporting was not effective at December 31, 2008.

        The effectiveness of the Company's internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2008 has been audited by PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, an independent registered public accounting firm, as stated in their attestation report included in Item 8 of this Form 10-K.

Changes in Internal Control Over Financial Reporting.

        There have been no changes in our internal control over financial reporting during the fourth quarter of 2008 that materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

Remediation of Material Weakness

        In the fourth quarter of 2008, management supplemented the Company's accounting staff with a dedicated, part-time senior consultant. Although, improvement was made to the operating effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2008, the material weakness will not be considered remediated until the existing or new additional resources and additional improvement to the operating of our internal control over financial reporting are in place for a sufficient period of time and are tested.

Item 9B.    OTHER INFORMATION.

        None.

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